Flying Log Books

All aircrew were required to keep a log of their time in the air, which had to be countersigned by their commanding officer at the end of each month.

Information recorded included:

  • Date
  • Hour (ie Take-Off Time)
  • Aircraft Type and Serial No.
  • Pilot
  • Duty (eg Navigator, Air Bomber, Wireless Operator etc)
  • Remarks (ie Purpose of the Flight [eg Cross Country, Circuits and Landings etc])
  • Flying Times [Day / Night]

Extract from JF Myers’ Flying Log Book [Courtesy of Rod Myers]

Aircraft “Snag Book”

Description

The aircraft “snag book” was used to record the damage to each aircraft after operations

Example

The following extract shows the damage to No. 35 aircraft after operations on 12th September 1944:

Snag Book from B Flight [Courtesy of Sean Feast]

Source / Availability:

The extract on this page comes from the B Flight Snag Book (July to December 1944), held at the Pathfinder Museum.

This is the only No. 35 Squadron “Snag Book” that I have found during my research, although others may exist

Battle Orders

Description

Battle Orders were produced and put on display as and when a squadron had established which aircraft and crew were going to be utilised for a particular operation.

Example

The following example is from 23rd June 1944:

Source / Availability:

This is the only No. 35 Squadron Battle Order that I have found during my research, although others may exist

Target Photos

Description

Bomber pilots were required to fly their aircraft “straight and level” after the bombs had been dropped to enable the onboard camera to take a sequence of pictures which could be analysed to establish the accuracy of the bombing.

Example

The following example is from September 1944:

[Courtesy of Graham Briggs]

Source / Availability

No. 35 Squadron’s target photos do not appear to be held in an official central repository; those that I have obtained have been kindly provided by individuals.