Halifax W1231 (08/04/1943)

Halifax W1231 was one of eight No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Duisburg on the night of 8th / 9th April 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Harold Cass Pexton (Pilot)
  • Francis Fenton (Navigator)
  • Cyril Duggan Hughes (Air Bomber)
  • Colin John Weldon (Wireless Operator)
  • James Walter Warren (Air Gunner)
  • William David Ronald Walters (Air Gunner)
  • Ernest Frederick John Willis (Flight Engineer)

The Squadron’s Record Book shows “Returned early from Rotterdam (approximately) 23.38 hours, 13,000 feet owing to icing which prevented aircraft climbing even after jettisoning 4 x 1000lb GP; also DR Compass showed error of 120 degrees and Gee went U/S. Cloud up to 12,000 feet all the way to Dutch Coast with icing. 2 x 1000lb GP safe in sea 23.05hrs 9000ft, 5 x 1000lb GP live in sea off Dutch Coast 23.50hrs 12000ft. I x 2000lb HC hung up and fell off on runway on landing”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Graveley Flight Log

In the early hours of the 9th April 1943, a Halifax, U-Uncle was the last to land from operations. This was fortunate because as soon as it touched down, sparks were observed streaming out below the tail. After the aircraft had run a few hundred yards they ceased. An investigation disclosed a 2,000 lb. bomb on the centre of the main runway, near Flying Control. It had been hung up by its tail and when the aircraft touched down its nose was dragged along the runway until the bumps caused it to fall off. At dawn an airman was seen to be sitting on it smoking a cigarette, his job being to keep the inquisitive away.

AM Form 78

Halifax W7779 (20/04/1943)

Halifax W7779 was one of thirteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Stettin on the night of the 20th / 21st April 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • John Rushbrooke Petrie-Andrews (Pilot)
  • John Wright Armitage (Navigator)
  • Horace John Backhouse (Air Bomber)
  • Rhubean Burns Berwick (Wireless Operator)
  • George Dale (Air Gunner)
  • Norman Wilken Barnett (Air Gunner)
  • John Henry Morgan (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows: Shell exploded in nose of aircraft at 5459N 1053E at 23.57 hours whilst at 1000ft. Bomb Sight, air speed indicator, DR Compass and inter-com all made unserviceable. Wireless Operator and Navigator were wounded


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 21st April 1943; it was sent for repair and returned to the squadron on 24th May 1943

AM Form 1180

There is no AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) available; as such, there are no further details

Armitage and Berwick

Both airmen returned to operational service with the squadron shortly after the incident

Halifax W7873 (16/04/1943)

Halifax W7873 was one of ten No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Pilsen on the night of the 16th / 17th April 1943.

It was equipped with Nav Aid Y (H2S) and was carrying 4 x 250lb and 24 Flares

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Wyndham Rhydian Owen (Pilot)
  • John Reid Martyn (Navigator)
  • George Cruickshank (Air Bomber)
  • David Ronald Bradley (Wireless Operator)
  • Cyril Bourne (Air Gunner)
  • Joseph William Young (Air Gunner)
  • William George Allen (Flight Engineer)

The route was Cayeux, 4937N 0205E, 4920N 0700E, 4855N 1230E, Pilsen, 4950N 0550E, 4937N 0205E, 5010N 0130E

W7873 failed to return and the squadron’s Operations Record Book shows ” This aircraft is missing. No messages received.”

Wartime activities relating to the loss

On 17th April 1943 the squadron informed Bomber Command, the Air Ministry and the RAF Records Office that the aircraft and crew were missing.

A telegram, along with a follow up letter from the Commanding Officer, was sent to the next of kin of each crew member advising them that he was “missing as the result of air operations on 16th / 17th April 1943”.

The crew’s kit and personal belongings were removed from their lockers and catalogued; kit was returned to stores and personal belongings sent to the RAF Central Depository at RAF Colnbrook.

The Air Ministry Casualty Branch, which was responsible for investigating, monitoring and reporting on the status of missing aircraft and airmen, subsequently published the following information regarding the crew:

  • Air Ministry Casualty Communique No. 243 (Flight 17/06/1943) reported G Cruickshank,
    JR Martyn and C Bourne as “missing”
  • Air Ministry Casualty Communique No. 324 (Flight 23/12/1943) reported JW Young “previously reported missing believed killed in action” as “now presumed killed in action”; also G Cruickshank and C Bourne “previously reported missing” as “now presumed killed in action”
  • Air Ministry Casualty Communique No. 328 (Flight 06/01/1944) reported JR Martyn “previously reported missing” as “now presumed killed in action”

Note: Presumption of death enabled a death certificate to be issued; personal belongings could then be sent to next of kin, along with any monies due.

No. 35 Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows the following information was received relating to the crew:

  • 01/06/1943: Information received from Air Ministry that F/L Owen, missing on 16th / 17th April 1943 is a prisoner of war; also that Sgt Young was killed
  • 22/06/1943: F/S Bradley and F/S Allen, missing on 16th / 17th April 1943, returned to the UK
  • 23/07/1943: Information received from Air Ministry that P/O Cruickshank, Sgt Martyn and F/S Bourne, missing on 16th / 17th April 1943 were killed

Crew members who survived the crash and evaded capture

DR Bradley and WG Allen survived the crash and evaded captured.

Their Evasion Reports, which were completed on their return to the UK, show the following details:

  • DR Bradley
    • Baled Out / Landed: Nr Villiers Le Thour
    • Evasion Route: France / Spain / Gibraltar
    • Repatriated: Hendon 22/06/1943
  • WG Allen
    • Baled Out / Landed: Nr Villiers Le Thour (Sprained Ankle)
    • Evasion Route: France / Spain / Gibraltar
    • Repatriated: Hendon 22/06/1943

Crew members who survived the crash and were captured / imprisoned

WR Owen survived the crash and was captured, interrogated and imprisoned for the remainder of the war.

His POW Liberation Questionnaire, which was completed as part of the repatriation process at 106 Personnel Reception Centre (RAF Cosford) in 1945, shows the following details:

  • WR Owen (POW Liberation Questionnaire yet to be obtained, so information is unconfirmed)
    • Captured:
    • Imprisoned: Stalag Luft III
    • Repatriated:

Post War search for the missing crew members

After the war, an investigation officer from the Royal Air Force Missing Research and Enquiry Service (MRES) was tasked with locating the remains of the missing crew member(s).

Original German documents, burial records and eye witness accounts were utilised to establish the location of the crash site, the cause of the loss and the initial fate of the crew; information was recorded in a MRES Investigation Report.

As part of the process, any remains that were located were exhumed, identified (wherever possible) and concentrated (reinterred) at one of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s (CWGC) Cemeteries in the country that they fell, in accordance with Government policy at the time.

Graves were marked with a simple wooden cross, which was replaced by the familiar CWGC headstone during the 1950’s.

Missing airmen who could not be found, or formally identified, had their names commemorated on the Air Forces Memorial at Runnymede, which was unveiled in 1953.

CWGC records do not show where the remains of G Cruickshank, JR Martyn, C Bourne and JW Young were located but show that they were concentrated (reinterred) at LIESSE COMMUNAL CEMETERY as follows:

  • BOURNE, CYRIL Flight Sergeant ‘933423’  Mil. Plot. Row A. Coll. grave 3-6.
  • CRUICKSHANK, GEORGE Pilot Officer ‘136732’ Mil. Plot. Row A. Coll. grave 3-6.
  • MARTYN, JOHN REID Flight Sergeant ‘R/133280’ Mil. Plot. Row A. Coll. grave 3-6.
  • YOUNG, JOSEPH WILLIAM Sergeant ‘1216336’ Mil. Plot. Row A. Coll. grave 3-6

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Theo Boiten (Nachtjagd Combat Archive)

Nightfighter Claim: Lt. Helmut Bergmann, Stab III./NJG4, Nr Sevigny 15km NW Rethel (France) (Krebs), 5800m, 23.03

Bomber Command Loss Card

  • Outward bound whilst flying straight and level at 16000ft in Champagne area, burst of flak under aircraft at 22.56. More text which needs deciphering

DR Bradley / WG Allen Evasion Report

About 22.55hrs, on our way to the target, we were hit by flak about 30km west of Reims. The aircraft was set on fire and went out of control. The captain gave the order to stand by to bale out, but we heard no further word from him afterwards. We baled out after G Cruickshank.

Evasion Report Numbers (National Archives)

  • WO228/3313/1252 DR Bradley
  • WO228/3313/1251 WG Allen

Halifax JB785 (20/04/1943)

Halifax JB785 was one of thirteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Stettin on the night of the 20th / 21st April 1943.

It was carrying 2 x 1000lb GP and 5 target indicators. Its designated Path Finder role was Visual Marker

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Walter Scott Sherk (Pilot)
  • Roy Gordon Morrison (Navigator)
  • Mathias Stanley Keon (Air Bomber)
  • George Glover McGladrey (Wireless Operator)
  • George Francis Denis Murray (Air Gunner)
  • Henry Thomas Woonton (Air Gunner)
  • Douglas Glenn Bebensee (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “At 01.08 aircraft was hit by incendiaries dropped by aircraft coned above. Incendiaries fell through pilot’s escape hatch, setting pilot’s seat on fire and exploding in engineer’s compartment. Aircraft was out of control and pilot gave order to abandon aircraft and crew proceeded to do this. Pilot then managed to bring aircraft under partial control and cancelled order to bale out but found that rear gunner and bomb aimer had already abandoned aircraft”

The aircraft landed back at Graveley at 06.33

Wartime activities relating to the loss

On 21st April 1943 the squadron informed Bomber Command, the Air Ministry and the RAF Records Office that two of the crew (MS Keon and HT Woonton) were missing.

A telegram, along with a follow up letter from the Commanding Officer, was sent to the next of kin of MS Keon and HT Woonton advising them that he was “missing as the result of air operations on 20th / 21st April 1943”.

Their kit and personal belongings were removed from their lockers and catalogued; kit was returned to stores and personal belongings sent to the RAF Central Depository at RAF Colnbrook.

The Air Ministry Casualty Branch, which was responsible for investigating, monitoring and reporting on the status of missing aircraft and airmen, subsequently provided No. 35 Squadron with the following information regarding the crew:

  • 01/06/1943: Information received from Air Ministry that F/S Keon, missing on 20th / 21st April 1943 is a prisoner of war
  • 08/06/1943: Information received from Air Ministry that F/S Woonton, missing on 20th / 21st April 1943 is a prisoner of war

Crew members who were captured / imprisoned

MS Keon and HT Woonton were captured, interrogated and imprisoned for the remainder of the war.

Their POW Liberation Questionnaires, which were completed as part of the repatriation process at 106 Personnel Reception Centre (RAF Cosford) in 1945, show the following details:

  • MS Keon (POW Liberation Questionnaire yet to be obtained, so information is unconfirmed)
    • Captured:
    • Imprisoned: Stalag Luft I, Stalag Luft VI, Stalag 357
    • Repatriated:
  • HT Woonton (POW Liberation Questionnaire yet to be obtained, so information is unconfirmed)
    • Captured:
    • Imprisoned: Stalag Luft I, Stalag Luft VI, Stalag 357
    • Repatriated:

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as Cat FB/AC; it was repaired on site and returned to the squadron on 16th May 1943

AM Form 1180

The AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows “Aircraft struck by incendiary bomb, jamming the controls – two of the crew baled out”

Award Citations

WS Sherk was awarded the Bar to the Distinguished Flying Cross and RG Morrison, GG McGladrey and DG Bebensee the Distinguished Flying Medal for their actions during the incident.

The citation reads:

One night in April, 1943, P/O. Sherk, F/O’s McGladrey and Morrison, and Sgt. Bebensee were pilot, wireless operator, navigator and flight engineer respectively in an aircraft which attacked Stettin. Whilst over the target area the bomber was struck by falling incendiary bombs. One of them, which lodged behind the pilot’s seat, jammed the aileron and rudder controls. Flames and smoke rapidly filled the cockpit, and P/O Sherk’s clothing caught alight. The aircraft began to lose height, diving steeply. P/O Sherk endeavoured to regain control, whilst F/O McGladrey attempted to subdue the flames. Meanwhile Sgt. Bebensee struggled to free the locked controls. Just as the situation appeared hopeless the pilot regained control, and a course was set for home as F/O McGladrey extinguished the fire. Much of the navigational equipment had been lost, but F/O Morrison, displaying great skill, was able to plot accurate courses. Sgt. Bebensee, who worked untiringly for three-quarters of an hour, succeeded in freeing the controls. Eventually P/O Sherk flew the badly damaged bomber back to this country.

Halifax HR678 (14/04/1943)

Halifax HR678 was one of seventeen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Stuttgart on the night of the 14th / 15th April 1943.

It was equipped with Nav Aid Y (H2S) and carrying 2 x 1000lb, 4 250lb (incl. TI) and 24 flares. Its designated Path Finder role was Backer Up

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Ronald Edward Wilkes (Pilot)
  • Terence Gordon O’Shaughnessy (Navigator)
  • Ronald Wheatley (Air Bomber)
  • Frederick Hay (Wireless Operator)
  • Frank Walter Vincent (Air Gunner)
  • Michael Albert Edward Bradford (Air Gunner)
  • Thomas Laurie Brown (Flight Engineer)

The route was 5000N 0115E, 4909N 0920E, Target, 4840N 0908E, 4858N 0420E, 5000N 0115E

HR678 failed to return and the squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “This aircraft failed to return; no messages received”

Wartime activities relating to the loss

On 15th April 1943 the squadron informed Bomber Command, the Air Ministry and the RAF Records Office that the aircraft and crew were missing.

A telegram, along with a follow up letter from the Commanding Officer, was sent to the next of kin of each crew member advising them that he was “missing as the result of air operations on 14th / 15th April 1943”.

The crew’s kit and personal belongings were removed from their lockers and catalogued; kit was returned to stores and personal belongings sent to the RAF Central Depository at RAF Colnbrook.

The Air Ministry Casualty Branch, which was responsible for investigating, monitoring and reporting on the status of missing aircraft and airmen, subsequently published the following information regarding the crew:

  • Air Ministry Casualty Communique No. 245 (Flight 24/06/1943) reported RE Wilkes and F Hay as “missing, believed killed in action”; also R Wheatley and  MAE Bradford as “missing”
  • Air Ministry Casualty Communique No. 562 (Flight 24/01/1946) reported MAE Bradford “previously reported missing” as “now presumed killed in action”

No. 35 Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows the following information was received relating to the crew:

  • 09/06/1943: Information received from the Air Ministry that F/S O’Shaughnessy, F/S Vincent and Sgt Brown are prisoners of war

Crew members who survived the crash and were captured / imprisoned

TG O’Shaughnessy, FW Vincent and TL Brown survived the crash and were captured, interrogated and imprisoned for the remainder of the war.

Their POW Liberation Questionnaires, which were completed as part of the repatriation process at 106 Personnel Reception Centre (RAF Cosford) in 1945, show the following details:

  • TG O’Shaughnessy (POW Liberation Questionnaire yet to be obtained, so information is unconfirmed)
    • Captured:
    • Imprisoned: Stalag Luft III, Stalag Luft VI, Stalag 357
    • Repatriated:
  • FW Vincent (POW Liberation Questionnaire yet to be obtained, so information is unconfirmed)
    • Captured:
    • Imprisoned: Stalag Luft III, Stalag Luft VI, Stalag 357
    • Repatriated:
  • TL Brown (POW Liberation Questionnaire yet to be obtained, so information is unconfirmed)
    • Captured:
    • Imprisoned: Stalag Luft I, Stalag Luft VI, Stalag 357
    • Repatriated:

Post War search for the missing crew members

After the war, an investigation officer from the Royal Air Force Missing Research and Enquiry Service (MRES) was tasked with locating the remains of the missing crew member(s).

Original German documents, burial records and eye witness accounts were utilised to establish the location of the crash site, the cause of the loss and the initial fate of the crew; information was recorded in a MRES Investigation Report.

As part of the process, any remains that were located were exhumed, identified (wherever possible) and concentrated (reinterred) at one of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s (CWGC) Cemeteries in the country that they fell, in accordance with Government policy at the time.

Graves were marked with a simple wooden cross, which was replaced by the familiar CWGC headstone during the 1950’s.

Missing airmen who could not be found, or formally identified, had their names commemorated on the Air Forces Memorial at Runnymede, which was unveiled in 1953.

CWGC records show that the remains of RE Wilkes, R Wheatley, F Hay and MAE Bradford were located at Niederlustadt Cemetery, Germersheim District, Königreich Bayern

hr678-concentration-report

Their remains were exhumed, identified and concentrated (reinterred) at RHEINBERG WAR CEMETERY on 14th May 1948 as follows:

  • BRADFORD, MICHAEL ALBERT EDWARD, Flight Sergeant ‘411478’  Coll. grave 8. C. 12-15.
  • WHEATLEY, RONALD, Flying Officer ‘412053’ Coll. grave 8. C. 12-15.
  • HAY, FREDERICK, Flight Sergeant ‘1002505’ Coll. grave 8. C. 12-15.
  • WILKES, RONALD EDWARD, Pilot Officer ‘141103’ Coll. grave 8. C. 12-15.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Theo Boiten (Nachtjagd Combat Archive)

Nightfighter Claim: Hptm. Heinrich Wohlers, Stab IV./NJG4, Niederlustadt (Bergziege), 5000m, 00.23

Map showing locations

Map showing loss area and original burial location

Halifax DT806 (10/04/1943)

Halifax DT806 was one of nineteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Frankfurt on the night of the 10th / 11th April 1943.

It was equipped with H2S and was carrying 1 x 1000lb HE, 4 x TI (Red) and various flares. Its designated Path Finder role was Ground Marker

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • George Frank Lambert (Pilot)
  • John Richard Jones (Navigator)
  • Vernon Reginald Matthews (Air Bomber)
  • Ronald Arnold Kempsell (Wireless Operator)
  • Reginald Albert Nason (Air Gunner)
  • Samuel James Knight (Air Gunner)
  • Anthony Claude Beddoe (Flight Engineer)

The route was 5000N 0132E, Oppenheim, Frankfurt, 5015N 0840E, 5000N 0132E.

DT806 failed to return and the squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “This aircraft failed to return and was not heard of after leaving base”

Wartime activities relating to the loss

On 11th April 1943 the squadron informed Bomber Command, the Air Ministry and the RAF Records Office that the aircraft and crew were missing.

A telegram, along with a follow up letter from the Commanding Officer, was sent to the next of kin of each crew member advising them that he was “missing as the result of air operations on 10th / 11th April 1943”.

The crew’s kit and personal belongings were removed from their lockers and catalogued; kit was returned to stores and personal belongings sent to the RAF Central Depository at RAF Colnbrook.

The Air Ministry Casualty Branch, which was responsible for investigating, monitoring and reporting on the status of missing aircraft and airmen, subsequently published the following information regarding the crew:

  • Air Ministry Casualty Communique No. 241 (Flight 17/06/1943) reported VR Matthews and AC Beddoe as “missing, believed killed in action”; also SJ Knight and RA Nason as “missing”
  • Air Ministry Casualty Communique No. 348 (Flight 24/02/1944) reported VR Matthews and AC Beddoe “previously reported missing, believed killed in action” as “now presumed killed in action”; also SJ Knight and RA Nason “previously reported missing” as “now presumed killed in action”

Note: Presumption of death enabled a death certificate to be issued; personal belongings could then be sent to next of kin, along with any monies due.

No. 35 Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows the following information was received relating to the crew:

  • 03/06/1943: Information received from Air Ministry that Sgt Jones, missing on 10th / 11th April 1943, is a prisoner of war; also that Sgt Nason and Sgt Knight of the same crew were killed
  • 16/12/1943: Information received from Air Ministry that F/O Lambert, missing on 10th / 11th April 1943, is safe in a neutral country

Crew members who survived the crash and evaded capture

GF Lambert survived the crash and evaded capture as follows:

  • Evasion Route: France / Switzerland / France / Spain / Gibraltar
  • Repatriated: Whitchurch (24/02/1944)

Crew members who survived the crash and were captured / imprisoned

JR Jones and RA Kempsell survived the crash and were captured, interrogated and imprisoned for the remainder of the war.

Their POW Liberation Questionnaires, which were completed as part of the repatriation process at 106 Personnel Reception Centre (RAF Cosford) in 1945, show the following details:

  • JR Jones
    • Captured: Heziers, France (12/04/1943)
    • Interrogated: Dulag Luft Oberursel, Frankfurt Apr-43
    • Imprisoned: Stalag Luft I, Barth Apr-43 to Nov-43
    • Imprisoned: Stalag Luft VI, Heydekrug Nov-43 to Jun-44
    • Imprisoned: Stalag Luft IV, Gross Tychow Jun-44 to Feb-45
    • Imprisoned: Stalag IIB, Fallingbostel Mar-45 to Apr-45
    • Repatriated: May-45
  • RA Kempsell (POW Liberation Questionnaire yet to be obtained, so information is unconfirmed)
    • Captured:
    • Imprisoned: Stalag Luft I, Stalag Luft VI, Stalag Luft IV
    • Repatriated:

Post War search for the missing crew members

After the war, an investigation officer from the Royal Air Force Missing Research and Enquiry Service (MRES) was tasked with locating the remains of the missing crew member(s).

Original German documents, burial records and eye witness accounts were utilised to establish the location of the crash site, the cause of the loss and the initial fate of the crew; information was recorded in a MRES Investigation Report.

As part of the process, any remains that were located were exhumed, identified (wherever possible) and concentrated (reinterred) at one of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s (CWGC) Cemeteries in the country that they fell, in accordance with Government policy at the time.

Graves were marked with a simple wooden cross, which was replaced by the familiar CWGC headstone during the 1950’s.

Missing airmen who could not be found, or formally identified, had their names commemorated on the Air Forces Memorial at Runnymede, which was unveiled in 1953.

CWGC records do not show where the remains of VR Matthews, SJ Knight, RA Nason and AC Beddoe were located but show that they were concentrated (reinterred) at FLEIGNEUX COMMUNAL CEMETERY as follows:

  •  BEDDOE, ANTHONY CLAUDE (TONY) Sergeant ‘904734’  Coll. grave.
  • KNIGHT, SAMUEL JAMES Sergeant ‘1311941’ Coll. grave.
  • MATTHEWS, VERNON REGINALD Flying Officer ‘122220’ Coll. grave.
  • NASON, REGINALD ALBERT Sergeant ‘1397903’ Coll. grave.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Theo Boiten (Nachtjagd Combat Archive)

Nightfighter Claim: Lt. Helmut Bergmann, Stab III./NJG4, Near Fleigneux 5 km N Sedan (France) (8A), 3600m, 01.40

WR Chorley (Bomber Command Losses of the Second World War)

Outbound at 16,000ft, shot down by a nightfighter and crashed at Fleigneux

Evasion Report Numbers (National Archives)

  • WO228/3318/1785 GF Lambert

Halifax DT804 (16/04/1943)

Halifax DT804 was one of ten No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Pilsen on the night of 16th / 17th April 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Peter Johnston (Pilot)
  • Peter Geoffrey Powell (Navigator)
  • Roy Wood (Air Bomber)
  • Benjamin Thomas Royall (Wireless Operator)
  • Harold John Rogers (WOP / AG)
  • Andrew Walt Cowan (Air Gunner)
  • Frederick James Jarvis (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “At 00.30, 14,000 feet, 8 miles SSE of Crailshan, engaged by twin engined enemy fighter, believed to be JU88. Results of combat unobserved but Halifax sustained a burst tyre and some bullet holes.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as Cat FB AC; it was repaired on site and returned to the squadron on 16th May 1943