1962 (Squadron Reformed)

No 35 Squadron reformed as the sixth Vulcan Mk2 Squadron in No 1 Group, Bomber Command and as the third and final “V” Squadron at RAF Coningsby on 1st November 1962. The Air Ministry subsequently changed the official reformation date to 1st December 1962

Stationed at:

  • RAF Coningsby (Lincolnshire)

Role:

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing

Command

  • Coningsby Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander AA Smailes AFC

Strength

35 Squadron Research Image

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that on 1st November 1962 “Wing Commander AA Smailes (Squadron Commander) and his crew, Flight Lieutenant GG Ness and his crew, Squadron Leader GC Goodyer (A Flight Commander), Squadron Leader DA Thomas (B Flight Commander) and Squadron Leader D Craig (C Flight Commander), together with 25 senior NCOs and airmen, were present for a Squadron photograph. A welcoming message was then given by the Station Commander”
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Activities

  • Logistics
    • A small number of personnel were employed in setting up barracks, offices, dispersal offices, aircraft stands and rigs and preparing training material.
  •  Air Crew Training
    • There was a limited amount of flying training carried out at RAF Scampton
  • Target Study
    • In December, all aircrew started their Target Study
  • QRA
    • AA Smailes and his crew carried out the squadron’s first QRA in December 1962

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (which were initially loaned from other squadrons):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The squadron had none of its establishment number of six on charge in 1962; all flying was carried out using loaned aircraft from RAF Scampton

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on loan to, or on charge of, the squadron, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1963

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron, with QRA capability, throughout 1963

 Stationed at:

  • RAF Coningsby (Lincolnshire)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing

Command

  • Coningsby Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Wing Commander AA Smailes AFC
    • 16/04/1963: Handed over to Wing Commander DB Craig

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • War Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Training Programme included: Overshoots, Practice Diversion, Instrument Landing (ILS), Ground Control Approach (GCA), Precision Approach Radar (PAR), Navigation and Bombing System (NBS) / Radar Bomb Score (RBS) Attacks, Live Bombing, Navigation (Limited / Secondary / Primary), Visual Bombing, Formation Flying, Fighter Affiliation, Maximum All Up Weight Take Off, 1500 mile / Maximum Length Profile and ECM Runs
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Fairway (February / March 1963)
    • Mayflight (May 1963)
    • Mystic (July 1963)
    • Mick (August 1963)
    • Kinsman (September 1963)
    • Lion Vert (September 1963)
    • Mickey Finn (November 1963)
    • Lime Jug (December 1963)
  • Rangers
    • Western
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Freedom of Boston Flypast (May 1963)
    • RAF Honington (June 1963)
    • Demonstration Scramble [Andover] (October 1963)
    • Demonstration Scramble [Coningsby] (October 1963)
  • Bombing Competitions

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Events

Leader R Dick (No. 9 Squadron), No. 2 Position GG Ness (No. 35 Squadron) and No. 3 Position N Steel (No. 12 Squadron) in Freedom of Boston Flypast 16th May 1963
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (which were initially loaned and then from own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The squadron took delivery of its first “establishment” Avro Vulcan B2 (XJ823) in January 1963, although this was then passed to a Modification Team for “Rapid Start” modifications. As a result, it continued to use aircraft from other squadrons for flying training, initially using aircraft from Scampton and then aircraft from No. 9 and No. 12 Squadron (also based at Coningsby), whilst it built up its own establishment of six aircraft.

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on loan to, or on charge of, the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1964

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron, with QRA capability, throughout 1964

 Stationed at:

  • RAF Coningsby (Lincolnshire)
  • 02/11/1964: Moved to RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (changed to low level in February)

Command

  • Coningsby Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command
  • 02/11/1964: Transferred to Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • DB Craig

Strength

(#) In March 1964, all technical and engineering work (including daily servicing of squadron aircraft) was transferred to the station Technical Wing (Centralised Servicing), leaving only Administration Personnel on strength of the squadron


Activities

Air Crew

  • War Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Training Programme included: 1500 mile / Maximum Length Profile, Navigation and Bombing System (NBS) / Radar Bomb Score (RBS) Attacks, Live Bombing, Practice Diversion, Navigation (Limited / Secondary / Primary), Formation Flying, Fighter Affiliation and ECM Runs. Low level attack was introduced in February 1964 and in-flight refuelling (in readiness for Far East commitments) was introduced in May 1964
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Kinsman (Regular)
    • Mick (January 1964)
    • Phoenix (January 1964)
    • Teamwork [NATO Exercise] (September 1964)
    • Mickey Finn (October 1964)
    • Statex (November 1964)
  • Rangers
    • Wildenrath
    • Akrotiri
    • Luqa
    • Western
    • Goose Bay
    • Butterworth (Malaysia)
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Demonstration Scramble [Wittering] (February 1964)
    • RCAF National Air Force Day [Rockcliffe, Ottawa] (May / June 1964)
    • RAF Marham (June 1964)
    • RAF Honington (July 1964)
    • Battle of Britain [RAF Finningley] (September 1964)
    • Independence Celebrations [Malta] (September 1964)
    • Farewell to Boston Parade (October 1964)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Squadron Bombing Competition

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations (up until March 1964)
  • Administrative Duties

Events

XM607 at RAF Luqa 1964

[With kind permission of Jim Simpson]


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is xm645-at-coningsby-1965-courtesy-of-doug-charnley-on-fb-but-not-the-owner.jpg

In March, centralised servicing was introduced and aircraft from the three Coningsby squadrons (No. 9, 12 and 35 Squadron) were incorporated into a common “station pool” and then allocated to crews to meet each squadron’s daily flying programme. This resulted in the loss of squadron markings on the tailplane, although the Coningsby / Cottesmore Wing and Squadron badges were included on the entrance door.

XM645 at Coningsby (showing the Wing and Squadron Badges on the entrance door)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from own establishment and then from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


With advancements in surface to air missiles, it was necessary to change the method of attack to “low level”. As a result, navigational equipment was adapted, the aircraft camouflage was changed and squadron crews started to train in the new procedures in February 1964.

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, or available from a station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1965

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron, with QRA capability, throughout 1965

Stationed at:

  • RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing

Command

  • Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander DB Craig
    • 01/06/1965: Handed over to Wing Commander DA Arnott DFC

Wing Commander DA Arnott DFC


Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Training Programme included: Low Level, Hi-Lo-Hi, 1500 Mile / Maximum Length Training Profile, Visual Bombing, Navigation and Bombing System (NBS) / Radar Bomb Score (RBS) Attacks, Live Bombing, Navigation (Limited / Secondary / Primary), Practice Diversion, Fighter Affiliation and ECM Runs.
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kinsman (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Billion (Regular)
    • Spherical (Muharraq, Gan, Tengah, Butterworth) (April / May 1965)
    • Kingpin (June 1965)
    • Mickey Finn (July 1965)
    • Tiger Cub (July 1965)
    • Alpine (August 1965)
    • Unison (August / September 1965)
    • Donovan (October 1965)
    • Statex (December 1965)
  • Rangers
    • Wildenrath
    • Gardermoen
    • Idris
    • Luqa
    • El Adem
    • Western
    • Goose
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Battle of Britain Day Demonstration Scramble [Cottesmore] (September 1965)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • No 1 Group Medium Bomber Competition

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Events

IMG_0764.JPG

Aircraft from the squadron at Butterworth during Operation Spherical (April / May 1965)
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


1965 Training Exercise © IWM (RAF-T 5756)

Avro Vulcan B2 XM599 of No 35 Squadron based at RAF Cottesmore releases a full bomb load of twenty-one 1000lb bombs, during an exercise in 1965.
[© IWM RAF-T 5756]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from Cottesmore Pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available from the station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1961 (Squadron Disbanded)

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron until 11th September 1961 when it was disbanded

Stationed at:

  • RAF Upwood (Cambridgeshire)
  • Detached Idris (Spring “Sunspot” 20/02/1961 to 21/03/1961)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit) (*)

(*) Assigned to NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander in Europe for operational and targeting purposes)


Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander H Neubroch OBE

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Marshmallow (Regular)
    • Statex (Regular)
    • Mantis (Regular)
    • Polar Bear (Regular)
    • Thorn (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Regex 61 (March 1961)
    • May Flight IV / Matador (May 1961)
    • Co-Op (June 1961)
    • Fairwind (June 1961)
  • Rangers (*)
    • Eastleigh
    • El Adem
    • Gibraltar
    • Jever
    • Laarbruch
    • Salisbury (Southern Rhodesia)
    • Thornhill
    • Wildenrath / Laarbruch
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Bagington / Hullavington (July 1961)
    • Photographic Sorties for BBC and Flight Magazine (August 1961)
    • Farnborough (September 1961)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • NEAF Bombing and Navigation Competition (RAF Akrotiri)

(*) Note: From July, all Lone Rangers crossing the Mediterranean were cancelled due to the situation in Kuwait.

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Events

AOC Inspection (June 1961)
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Squadron Commanders’ Remarks (September 1961)

“All tasks arising before disbandment – flying, administrative, ceremonial and social were completed in full. It merely remains for me to wish our successors on No. 35 Squadron, joy and success – may all their runs be straight and true”


Message from the Air Officer Commanding (13th September 1961)

My grateful thanks to you and all those officers and airmen who have served in No. 35 Squadron whilst it has been in my Group. The squadron has performed splendid service and it has never failed to achieve what has been asked of it. My best wishes to you all in the future”


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

CANBERRA B.2 and T.4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

In January, the squadron started the process of replacing all frangible hatches, with metal hatches. In February, all squadron aircraft with frangible hatches (WK130, WJ635, WJ732, WJ751, WH918 and WH920) were grounded until replacement hatches were fitted.

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on losses and incidents:


1960

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1960

Stationed at:

  • RAF Upwood
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (Spring “Sunspot” 29/03/1960 to 10/05/1960)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander G Newberry
    • 18/07/1960: Handed over to Wing Commander H Neubroch OBE

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness and Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Marshmallow (Regular)
    • Cadmin (Regular)
    • Bombex (Regular)
    • Statex (Regular)
    • Argus (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Thorn (Regular)
    • Polar Bear (Regular)
    • Baccy (February 1960)
    • Arkex (April 1960)
    • Fawley (April 1960)
    • Regex (May 1960)
    • Yeoman (May 1960)
    • Fair Wind (June 1960)
    • Co-Op (August 1960)
    • Flashback (September 1960)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Bahrain
    • Cyprus
    • Eastleigh
    • Gibraltar
    • Gutersloh
    • Idris
    • Luqa
    • Thornhill
    • Salisbury
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • RAF Cottesmore (May 1960 [Static])
    • RAF Colitishall (August 1960 [Static])
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September 1960)
    • RAF Leconfield (September 1960)
  • Bombing Competitions

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Events

IMG_0730 1960 [MAHC]

Squadron personnel and aircraft on parade 1960
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Canberra WH913 over Malta (Sunspot 1960)
[Air Pictorial]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

CANBERRA B2 and T4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

On 15th February 1960, all Canberra aircraft were grounded pending the incorporation of a modification to the elevator spring tab operating rod. This modification and inspection also included the dropping of the tip tanks and Mod 2107. All aircraft were modified and air tested by 22nd February 1960

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on losses and incidents:


1959

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1959

Stationed at:

  • RAF Upwood (Cambridgeshire)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (Spring “Sunspot” 27/01/1959 to 24/02/1959)
  • Detached to St Mawgan (16/03/1959 to 24/03/1959)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (Autumn “Sunspot” 19/10/1959 to 24/11/1959)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander G Newberry

G Newberry 1959 [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Marshmallow (Regular)
    • Cadmin (Regular)
    • Bombex (Regular)
    • Statex (Regular)
    • Argus (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Dawn Breeze (March 1959)
    • Buckboard (April 1959)
    • Topweight (April 1959)
    • Thorn (April 1959)
    • Fair Wind (June 1959)
    • Mandate (July 1959)
    • Sledge (October 1959)
    • Sambar / Longhaul (October 1959)
    • Druggett (December 1959)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Akrotiri
    • Eastleigh, Kenya
    • Gibraltar
    • Gütersloh, Germany
    • Idris, Libya
    • Khormaskar, Aden
    • Thornhill, Rhodesia
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Presentation of Standard Flypast (June 1959)
    • ITV programme “Swansong” [12 seconds of footage incl. in the programme]
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September 1959)
  • Bombing Competitions

October Flying Log Book Extract (Courtesy of Richard MacNeil)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

Practice for the ITV Programme Swansong August 1959 [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre].jpg

Practice for the ITV Programme “Swansong” August 1959
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


On 16th June 1959, the Squadron Standard was presented by Princess Alexandra of Kent at a drumhead ceremony

– more details –


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

CANBERRA B2 and T4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

In August 1959, all Canberra were subject to a radiographic examination of their undercarriage, following failures of the grub screw which locked the outer piston to the sliding tube of the oleo leg assembly (defect signal 899/Eng 2/3 dated 28th August 1959). This resulted in the grounding of some of the squadron aircraft until modification had been carried out

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on losses and incidents:


1958

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1958

Stationed at:

  • RAF Upwood (*)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (04/03/1958 to 10/04/1958)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (09/09/1958 to 08/10/1958 )

    (*) Detached to RAF Coningsby whilst main runway at Upwood was resurfaced (October 1958)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RG Price DFC
    • 03/02/1958: Handed over to Wing Commander G Newberry

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Marshmallow (Regular)
    • Cadmus (Regular)
    • Bombex (Regular)
    • Brief (February 1958)
    • Green Cobra (March 1958)
    • Starshot (May 1958)
    • Fullplay (June 1958)
    • Wearaway (July 1958)
    • Crescent Hinge (October 1958)
    • Sunbeam (October 1958)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Ahlhorn
    • Gibraltar
    • Habbaniya
    • Idris
    • Luqa
    • Nicosia
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • International Air Show, Basel (September 1958)
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September 1958)
  • Bombing Competitions

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

The squadron also carried out ferry flights, delivering aircraft to Australia (August 1958)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

CANBERRA B2 and T4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available to the squadron from a station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:


1957

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1957

Stationed at:

  • RAF Upwood (Cambridgeshire)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (11/03/1957 to 08/04/1957)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (09/09/1957 to 04/10/1957)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RG Price DFC

Strength

Notes: In February 1957, the squadron amalgamated with No 18 Squadron and it sub divided into 3 Flights (A, B and C)


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness and Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Port Wine (August 1957)
    • Counterpunch (September 1957)
    • Deepwater (September 1957)
    • Phoenix (November 1957)
    • Orpen (December 1957)
    • Goldflake
    • Marshmallow
    • Vigilant
  • Lone Rangers
    • El Adem
    • Gibraltar
    • Idris
    • Luqa, Malta
    • Habbaniya
    • Wunstorf
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Farnborough (September 1957)
  • Bombing Competitions

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Events

Life on the squadron

An article by John Kirk regarding his time with the squadron
– Life on the Squadron –


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

CANBERRA B2 and T4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available to the squadron from a station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1956

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1956

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)
  • 24/07/1956: Moved to RAF Upwood (Huntingdonshire)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Marham Wing, Main Force, Bomber Command
  • 24/07/1956: Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader TA McCulloch
    • 05/03/1956: Handed over to Squadron Leader RG Price DFC

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

The Canberra aircraft were grounded from March to July, resulting in reduced flying activities.

In July, President Nasser of Egypt seized control of the Suez Canal and the UK, along with other countries, prepared to bring the Canal back under international control, utilising force, if necessary. During late July and August, the Canberra squadrons were utilised to ferry bombs for storage in Luqa, Malta (Operation Accumulate); there is no reference to this operation in No. 35 Squadron’s Operations Record Book

In October, a task force was deployed to Malta and Cyprus (Operation Musketeer) and the squadron was put on “standby”.  The offensive against President Nasser commenced on 30th October 1956, concluding on 5th November 1956. Whilst four of the squadron’s aircraft deployed to Cyprus, the squadron does not figure in the UK Battle Order for Operation Musketeer.


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Fusillade (March 1956)
    • Marshmallow (March 1956)
    • Stronghold (September 1956)
    • Whipsaw (September 1956)
    • Ratchet (October 1956)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Abu Sueir
    • Aden
    • Bahrain
    • Eastleigh
    • Gibraltar
    • Habbaniya
    • Idris
    • Khormaksar
    • Luqa
    • Nicosia
    • Wunstorf
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • None Recorded
  • Bombing Competitions
    • None Recorded

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations (up until October 1956)
  • Administrative Duties

Queen at Marham 1956 ([Movietone News).jpg

Queen Elizabeth II at Marham 23rd July 1956 [Source: Movietone News]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment until October 1956 and then from a station pool):

Canberra Profile

CANBERRA B.2 and T.4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that the introduction of centralised servicing in October 1956 resulted in the squadron using aircraft from the station pool and, as a result, the squadron badge no longer appeared on the tail fin.

On 5th March 1956, all aircraft were grounded until the electrical wiring to the tail plane actuators had been checked and modified. They were grounded again on 29th March 1956 awaiting further modifications to the tail plane actuators; the squadron started to receive the modified versions in July 1956.

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available to the squadron, firstly from its own establishment and then from a station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:


1955

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1955

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RS Sanders DFC AFC
    • 06/06/1955:  Handed over to Squadron Leader JR Musgrave DSO
    • 04/11/1955: Handed over to Squadron Leader TA McCulloch

Strength


Events affecting 35 Squadron

In January, the squadron became the first fully operational squadron at Marham, when the last crew achieved its combat classification; this was nine months after starting its conversion to the Canberra


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Sky High (April 1955)
    • Carte Blanche (June 1955)
    • Beware / Foxpaw (September 1955)
    • Phoenix
  • Lone Rangers
    • Gibraltar
    • Idris
    • Malta
    • Nairobi
    • Shaibah
    • Wunstorf
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Marham (Various Dates)
    • Cranwell (March 1955)
    • Biggin Hill (June 1955)
    • Geneva (June 1955)
    • Upwood (July 1955)
    • Farnborough (July 1955)
    • Baginton (August 1955)
    • Benson (October 1955)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Bomber Command Competition (March 1955)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Events

No. 35 Squadron display in Geneva 1955
[Source FlightGlobal 1st July 1955]


Carte Blanche
In the last week of June 1955, around 3000 NATO aircraft from Canada, Denmark, Greece, France, Norway, the UK and USA took part in the largest allied exercise held since the Second World War. The exercise, which was held in West Germany, included the simulated use of tactical nuclear weapons against airfields and troop concentrations.


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Canberra Profile

CANBERRA B2 and T4

Canberra Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1954

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron and then as a light bomber squadron during 1954

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)

Role

  • Medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron
  • 28/04/1954: Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • No. 3 Group, Bomber Command
  • 28/04/1954: Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RS Sanders DFC AFC

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

Throughout the year, squadron personnel continued conversion training on jet aircraft (at Weston Zoyland) in readiness for the move away from piston engine aircraft and at Bassingbourn / Lindholme for Canberra conversion.

In September, the first four crews (Stirrup, Millett, Rushforth and Crawford) achieved “Combat” status on the Canberra


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Dividend (July 1954)
    • Battle Royal (September 1954)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Gibraltar
    • Idris
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September 1954)
  • Bombing Competitions

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

The squadron continued ferry flights, returning the Washington aircraft back to the USA (Operation “Home Run”) until the end of March 1954


Events

BOMB EXPLOSION

On 20th September 1954, two 1,000lb bombs exploded on the perimeter track at Marham, killing an NCO
– more details –


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

BOEING B-29 [WASHINGTON]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


CANBERRA B.2 and T.4

On 28th April 1954, the squadron started to re-equip with the Canberra B2 (plus the T4 for dual-purpose training) [Establishment: 10 Aircraft]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following links provide more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:


1953

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron throughout 1953

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)

Role

  • Medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron

Command

  • No 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader FR Flynn AFC
    • 01/09/1953: Squadron Leader RS Sanders DFC AFC

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Jungle King (March 1953)
    • Momentum (August 1953)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Idris and Habbaniya
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Royal Review (Odiham July 1953)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Visual Bombing Contest (May 1953)
    • Lawrence Minot Visual Bombing Competition (September 1943)
    • Blind Bombing Competition (November 1953)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Events

odiham-1953-source-washington-times

One of the squadron’s Washington (WF572) on display at Odiham
[Source: Washington Times by Chris Howlett]

In July, the squadron commenced ferry flights, returning the Washington aircraft back to the USA (Operation “Home Run”)

During September / October, the squadron carried servicing personnel, spares and equipment to various bases along the route of the London to Christchurch air race.

In December, squadron personnel started conversion training on jet aircraft (at Weston Zoyland) in readiness for the move away from piston engined aircraft.


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Washington Profile

BOEING B-29 [WASHINGTON]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1952

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron throughout 1952

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)

Role

  • Training replacement crews for the Washington Squadrons (A Flight)
  • Medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron (B Flight)

Note: On 16th June 1952, with the squadron up to operational strength, A Flight was renamed the Washington Conversion Unit and B Flight was split into A and B Flights


Command

  • No. 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader FR Flynn AFC

Strength


Activities

A Flight (renamed Washington Conversion Unit on 16/06/1952)

  • Training replacement crews for the Washington Squadrons

B Flight (split into A and B Flight on 16/06/1952)

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Bait (Regular)
    • Bullseye (June 1952)
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Jigsaw (August 1952)
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue
    • Aid to Meteor Pilot 20 miles north of Yarmouth 24/07/1952
    • Search for Balliol aircraft from West Bay 14/08/1952
    • Search for two meteors off Flamborough Head 11/12/1952
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Battle of Britain Flypast
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Blind Bombing Competition (December 1952)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Extract from G Beattie’s Log Book [Courtesy of Robert Beattie]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Washington Profile

BOEING B-29 [WASHINGTON]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1951 (Squadron Reformed)

No. 35 Squadron (as part of the Washington Training Unit) was responsible for training crews to fly the Boeing B-29a [Washington]. The Unit completed its task of converting seven squadrons to Washington aircraft on 21st July 1951 and on 1st September 1951, the identity of No. 35 Squadron was assumed (having previously been placed into number plate status)

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)

Role

  • From September 1951
    • Ongoing training of replacement crews for the Washington Squadrons (A Flight)
    • Medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron (B Flight)

Note: Up until September 1951, personnel were training crews to fly the Boeing B-29a [Washington] (as part of the Washington Training Unit)


Command

  • No 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader FR Flynn AFC

Strength (from September 1951)

Unknown 35 Squadron crew
[Source: Washington Times]


Activities (from 1st September 1951)

A Flight

  • Training replacement crews for the Washington Squadrons

B Flight

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Exercise Bait (December)
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September 1951)

(#) All information prior to this date would have been recorded in the Washington Training Unit Record Book

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Washington Profile

BOEING B-29 [WASHINGTON]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on the known losses and incidents:

1950 (Squadron Disbanded)

On 23rd February 1950, No. 35 Squadron personnel were transferred to RAF Marham to form the nucleus of the B-29 [Washington] Training Unit (as part of the reorganisation of No. 3 Group). At this point in time the squadron took on “number plate” status

Stationed at:

  • RAF Mildenhall (Suffolk)
  • January 1950: Detached to Shallufa (Egypt)
  • 23/02/1950: Moved to RAF Marham [to form Washington Training Unit]

Role

  • Main Force Bomber Squadron

Command

  • No 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Squadron Leader BHD Foster DSO DFC

Strength

Officers at Mildenhall1 [The Tatler 22-03-1950].JPG

35 Squadron Officers and Aircrew at Mildenhall [The Tatler]


Activities (up to 23/02/1950)

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Cross Country, Practice Bombing (High Level, Live and Blind on H2S), Fighter Affiliation, Air to Ground / Air to Air Firing)
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Astro cross country and live bombing detail (January)
    • Exercise Lookout, to test defences in the Canal Zone (January)
    • Exercise Pinpoint (Astro Navigation and bombing at Habbaniya Bombing Range) (January)
    • Bullseye, Night Fighter Affiliation and Bombing Exercise (bombing Heligoland) in conjunction with 11 Group, 12 Group and RNAS (February)
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

lincoln-profile

AVRO LINCOLN

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


BOEING B-29 [WASHINGTON]

On 23rd February 1950, the Mildenhall Squadrons were re-equipped with the Boeing B-29 [Washington]. The squadron’s Lincoln aircraft were transferred to No 148 Squadron at RAF Upwood

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following links provide more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron:

1949

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron throughout 1949

Stationed at:

  • RAF Stradishall (Suffolk)
  • 10/02/1949: Moved to RAF Mildenhall (Suffolk)

Role

  • Heavy Bomber Squadron

Command

  • No. 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader BHD Foster DSO DFC

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Cross County (using Bomber Command Standard of Navigation), Practice Bombing, GCA, BABS / Rebecca Training, Three-Engine Flying, Circuits and Landings, Air / Sea Firing, Instrument Rating Practice, Ding-Don, Fighter Affiliation, Formation Flying
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Fighter Affiliation exercise at Thorney Island (February)
    • Attacks on the Firth of Forth and Clyde areas to exercise the Auxiliary Squadrons, ground defences and early warning systems (March)
    • Day fighter affiliation exercises with fighters from Duxford (March)
    • Exercise with the American fleets off Lands End (April)
    • Station Bullseye on Heligoland with live bombs being dropped on Heligoland and simulated bombing (April)
    • Exercise Foil which was aimed at testing the fighter defences of Great Britain. Mock attacks were made on London, Leeds, Sheffield and many other industrial areas in the country (June)
    • Phase II, Day III of Exercise Foil (July)
    • Exercise Verity, the main feature of which was an attack on the combined units of the American and Royal Navy (July)
    • Command Exercise the purpose of which was to test the Norwegian defences (September)
    • Exercise in affiliation with Anti-Aircraft Command, during which calibration of ground defences was checked (September)
    • Exercise ‘Bulldog’, a Bomber Command exercise in which attacks were made on various towns in England (September)
    • Command Bullseye attack on Heligoland (September)
    • Exercise with the Royal Observer Corps (October)
    • Group Night Fighter Affiliation exercises (October)
    • Exercise Porcupine (a RAF combined attack on units of the Home Fleet) (November)
    • Night Fighter Affiliation exercises (November)
    • Command Bullseye attack of Heligoland (November)
    • RAF Manston for Photographic Instruction (November)
    • Group Night Fighter Affiliation Exercises (December)
    • Day Fighter Affiliation Exercises (December)
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO LANCASTER B1 (FE)
Profile (© Malcolm Barrass)


AVRO LINCOLN

On 12th August 1949, the squadron started to re-equip with Avro Lincoln and the squadron aircrew started their Conversion Training

Avro Lincoln Profile (© Malcolm Barrass)

The following links provide more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron:


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

1949 Reunion

Photo from the June 1949 edition of the Marker showing 35 Squadron reunion

1948

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron throughout 1948

Stationed at:

  • RAF Stradishall (Suffolk)
  • January 1948: Detached to Shallufa
  • June / July 1948: Detached to Shallufa

Role

  • Heavy Bomber Squadron

Command

  • No. 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RJ Boulding
    • 18/10/1948: Handed over to Squadron Leader BHD Foster DSO DFC

Strength

50

No 35 (and No 115 Squadron) Shallufa January 1948


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Cross County (using Bomber Command Standard of Navigation), H2S Practice, Practice Bombing, BABS / Rebecca Training, Three-engine flying, Circuits and Landings, Air / Sea Firing, Instrument Flying, Fighter Affiliation, Formation Flying
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Bullseye to Heligoland (February)
    • Fighter Affiliation (April)
    • Simulation Bombing (on new flashlight target at Bristol) (April)
    • Group Bullseye Exercise (April)
    • Night Fighter Affiliation (May)
    • RCC Exercise (May)
    • Exercise Dawn (May)
    • Exercise Sunray (June / July)
    • Group Fighter Affiliation Exercise (July)
    • Operation Dagger (September)
    • Operation Chester (September)
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue
  • Displays and Flypasts
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Extract from RC Weeden’s Flying Log Book [Courtesy of Scott Weeden]


Events

Madras Presidency Presentation

At a ceremony at RAF Stradishall in March 1948, a writing table set that had been gifted by the Madras Presidency War Committee was presented to the squadron.


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Lancaster B.I(FE)

lancaster-b1-fe-profile

Avro Lancaster B1 (FE) Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron:


1947

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron throughout 1947

Stationed at:

  • RAF Stradishall (Suffolk)
  • Detachmed to Luqa / Italy (28/04/1947 to 10/05/1947)

RAF Stradishall


Role

  • Heavy Bomber Squadron
  • Stand-by Air Sea Rescue Squadron

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Wing Commander JND Chapple
    • 01/05/1947: Handed over to Squadron Leader RJ Boulding

Strength (Headquarters and A Flight (A and B Flights from 23/07/1947))


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Cross County (using Bomber Command Standard of Navigation), H2S Practice, Practice Bombing, VHF Homing, BABS / Rebecca Training, Searchlight Co-Operation, Flashlight Bombing, Three engine flying, circuits and landings, Air / Sea Firing, Photography, Instrument Flying, Fighter Affiliation
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Goodwood Bullseye (Regular)
    • Frontline (Regular)
    • Attack on HMS Implacable (March)
    • Sunbronze (April / May)
    • Boomer (June)
    • Home Fleet (June)
    • Group Night Fighter Affiliation Exercise(s) (September and December)
    • Group Bombing Exercise(s) (October and November)
  • Ceremonial Duties (including flypasts and displays)
  • Stand-by Air Sea Rescue

In the latter part of 1947, Bomber Command introduced a Categorisation Scheme with all aircrew trades (excluding Air Gunners) being categorised as A, B or C. Pilots were also assessed on their Instrument Flying and awarded “tickets”

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Other squadron related Technical and Administrative Duties

Extract from RC Weeden’s Log Book (January 1947) [Courtesy of Scott Weeden]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

lancaster-b1-fe-profile

AVRO LANCASTER B1 (FE)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:


1946

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron throughout 1946, representing the RAF at various events, including the Goodwill Tour of America

Stationed at:

  • RAF Graveley (Huntingdonshire)
  • 08/07/1946: Commenced Operation Lancaster (Goodwill Tour of USA)
  • 29/08/1946: Returned to RAF Graveley
  • 18/09/1946: Moved to RAF Stradishall (Suffolk)

Role

  • Heavy Bomber Squadron

Command

  • No 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Wing Commander AJL Craig DSO DFC
    • 24/10/1946: Handed over to Wing Commander JND Chapple

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

In January, the squadron was advised that it would be posted to Egypt during February, but this was cancelled for political reasons just before the squadron was due to leave.

In October 1946, the squadron was designated as one of the Air Sea Rescue (ASR) squadrons. The role required the squadron to have one aircraft on immediate readiness and one on stand-by for one week each month.


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Operational Duties and Exercises
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue (from October 1946)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Other squadron related Technical and Administrative Duties

Extract from RC Weeden’s Log Book March 1946 [Courtesy of Scott Weeden]


Events

BoB Flypast Web Photo

Twelve No. 35 Squadron aircraft in the Battle of Britain flypast on 14th September 1946


35 Squadron aircraft over London, returning to RAF Graveley after the Goodwill Tour (August 1946)



Delft Pottery Plaque

On 30th April 1946, No. 35 Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “A delft pottery plaque, which has been prepared in commemoration of the liberation of Holland, has been presented by the Dutch to the Squadron. It depicts in colour, a Dutch field being showered with foodstuffs from Lancaster aircraft, the latter being welcomed by two waving members of the population. The inscription at the bottom reads “Food, Peace, Freedom 29th April to 5th May 1945”


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO LANCASTER B.I and B.III

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


AVRO LANCASTER B.I (FE)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following links provide more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:


1966

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron, with QRA capability, throughout 1966.
It also provided detachment(s) to Tengah, in support of Operation Matterhorn (January to August 1966)

Stationed at:

  • RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)
  • Rotational Tengah Detachments (Operation Matterhorn) (January to August 1966)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing

Command:

  • Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command
  • Far East Air Force (Tengah Detachments)

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander DA Arnott DFC

Strength


World Events impacting the squadron

Indonesian Confrontation (Operation Matterhorn)

In 1966, the squadron sent detachments to Tengah, Singapore to provide support during the Indonesian Confrontation (which took place between 1963 and 1966).

The record book shows “Operation Matterhorn requires a number of Vulcan aircraft and crews to be detached to the Far East. No 35 Squadron carries one-third of this commitment and crews are detached to the theatre for periods of approximately three and a half months”

On Sunday 14th August, orders were received covering the withdrawal of the medium bombers to the United Kingdom. This followed the signing of the Bangkok Agreement by Malaysia and Indonesia, ending the confrontation between these two countries.


Activities

Air Crew

  • War Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kinsman (Regular)
    • Billion (Regular)
    • Mick (January and December 1966)
    • Co-Op (April and October 1966)
    • Micky Finn (May 1966)
    • Statex (November 1966)
  • Operation Matterhorn (Tengah Detachments) including exercises:
    • Long Horn (February 1966)
    • Anvil (February 1966)
    • Short Spica (March 1966)
    • Gannex (April and May 1966)
    • Anvil 2 (May 1966)
    • Angle Iron (June 1966)
    • Long Hop (June 1966)
    • High Castor (August 1966)
  • Rangers
    • Western
    • Pacific
    • Akrotiri
    • Goose
    • Luqa
    • El Adem
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • “Round the World Trip” for the Auckland Air Display (January / February 1966)
    • Firepower Demonstration at China Rock Bombing Range (July 1966)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • “Big Flight” – 1966 Strategic Air Command Bombing Competition (September / October 1966)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Events

Aircraft from No 12 and No 35 Squadron on display at the opening of Auckland Airport (January 1966). It is worth noting that whilst on this “Round the World Trip”, the aircraft covered the 2,100 nautical mile leg between Hawaii and California in a record time of 3hrs and 40 minutes


35 Squadron aircraft, which had returned from Darwin to Tengah on 17th August, prepare to return to the UK on 23rd. .

Flt. Lt JM Morgan and crew, Flt. Lt B Dorrington and crew and Flt. Lt PG Franklin and crew formed up after take off and did a flypast over Tengah for the benefit of the news cameramen covering the withdrawal.


Tengah2 [Marham Aviation Heritage Centre FB]

A low pass by Flt Lt J M Morgan at Tengah to mark the squadron’s departure from the Far East on 23rd August 1966.

[Source: Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from Cottesmore Pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available from the station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1967

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron, with QRA capability, throughout 1967

Stationed at:

  • RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)
  • Sunspot Detachment (June 1967)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing

Command

  • Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command

Note: The Cottesmore Wing was reduced to two squadrons (No. 9 and No. 35 Squadron) on 31st December 1967 when No. 12 Squadron was disbanded.


Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander DA Arnott DFC
    • 19/07/1967: Handed over to Wing Commander HS Carver MVO

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • War Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kinsman (Regular)
    • Billion (Regular)
    • Springtime (NATO Air Defence) (April 1967)
    • Sunspot Detachment (June 1967)
    • Kingpin (July 1967)
    • Micky Finn (July 1967)
    • Unison (October 1967)
    • Co-Op (Danish Air Defence) (October 1967)
    • Mick (November 1967)
    • Emlyn (November 1967)
  • Rangers
    • Wildenrath
    • Laarbruch
    • Western
    • Goose
    • Offutt
    • Pacific
    • Luqa
    • El Adem
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • RAF Oakington (January 1967)
    • Upper Heyford / Mildenhall (US Armed Forces Day) (May 1967)
    • Demonstration Scrambles (March, July and October 1967)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Station inter-squadron Bombing, Navigation and Communications Competition (February 1967)
    • Bomber Command Bombing, Navigation and Communications Competition (March 1967)
    • Giant Voice

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Events

Station Bombing Competition February 1967 [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre].jpg

Station Bombing Trophy
Wg. Cdr. Arnott collects the Trophy (February 1967)


 Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available from the station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents


1968

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1968, with QRA capability (up until 30th June)

Stationed at:

  • RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)
  • Detached to RAF Luqa (Sunspot) February / March 1968)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing

Command

  • Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command
  • 04/1968: Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Personnel

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander HS Carver MVO

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • War Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times) (ceased on 30th June 1968)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kinsman (Regular)
    • Billion (Regular)
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Groupex (January 1968)
    • Mick (January 1968)
    • Black Eagle (February 1968)
    • Sunspot (February / March 1968)
    • Sky Blue (June 1968)
    • Ravneklo (September 1968)
    • Co-Op (October 1968)
    • Micky Finn (November 1968)
  • Rangers
    • Western
    • Goose
    • Pacific
    • Akrotiri
    • El Adem
    • Luqa
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Queen’s Review (Abingdon)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Station Navigation, Communication and Bombing Competition (April 1968)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Extract from a Flying Log Book [Courtesy of the “Cyprus Years 69-71 Group”


Events

Battle of Britain Parade (York Minster)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available from the station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents

1969

On 1st January 1969, the squadron was posted to RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus as part of the UK’s commitment to CENTO.
It operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1969

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander HS Carver MVO
    • 02/09/1969: Handed over to Wing Commander RK Hepburn

Strength

Note: When the Squadron moved to Akrotiri from Cottesmore, crews were given staggered tourex dates at Akrotiri varying from eighteen months to three and a half years to keep a level of experience on the squadron while replacement crews came in. This staggered approach continued until all crews could do the standard 3 year tour.

No 35 Squadron October 1969 [Courtesy of Cyprus Years 69-71 Group]


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Calabria (Regular)
    • Early Affair (March 1969)
    • Springclip (April 1969)
    • Pedigree (April 1969)
    • Dawn Patrol (April 1969)
    • Malta ADEX (May 1969)
    • May Generation (May 1969)
    • Shahin 7 (September 1969)
    • Deep Furrow (October 1969)
    • Ranular (October 1969)
  • Rangers:
    • Tengah
    • UK
    • Island
    • Malta
    • Tehran
    • Ankara
    • Nairobi
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Firepower Demonstration (October 1969)
    • Scramble Demonstration (October 1969)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Note: A Vulcan Flight Simulator, Air Electronics Trainer and a Bombing Navigation Systems Trainer were installed at RAF Akrotiri during 1969


Events

Dispersal at RAF Akrotiri

The first five crews (Bayliss, Dorrington, Carver, Tench and Wood) departed for RAF Akrotiri (from RAF Cottesmore) on 15th January 1969.


[Courtesy of "Cyprus Years 69-71 Group"]

Newspaper article on squadron open day


The Cheshire Children’s Home in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia was adopted by the squadron in April 1969. Fund raising activities were organised and an annual donation was made to the home


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

Entrance Door

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following link provides more detail on the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:


1970

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1970

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal
  • Detachment to Masirah (March 1970)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander RK Hepburn

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Generation Exercise (February 1970)
    • ADEX (February and May 1970)
    • Pedigree (March 1970)
    • Epic Battle (April 1970)
    • Dawn Patrol (June 1970)
    • Shabaz 16 (July 1970)
    • Pedigree Five (October 1970)
    • Deep Express (October 1970)
    • Lime Jug (November 1970)
    • Hettie 2 (December 1970)
  • Rangers
    • Tengah
    • UK
    • Malta
    • Tehran
    • Ankara
    • Nairobi
  • Trainers
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Firepower Demonstration (September 1970)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Strike Command Bombing and Navigation Competition (representing NEAF) (April / May 1970)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Events

Visit of HRH Duchess of Gloucester October 1970.jpg

Visit of HRH Duchess of Gloucester October 1970


Vulcan XL445, flying as part of a 3 Ship to Masirah in December 1970

[Photograph courtesy of Dick Yates]


Presentation of the Detachment Board to Wg Cdr Christie, before the departure of the No. 35 Squadron and No. 9 Squadron to represent NEAF at the Strike Command Bombing and Navigation Competition (April / May 1970)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1971

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1971

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander RK Hepburn
    • 16/08/1971: Handed over to Wing Commander JB Fitzpatrick

RK Hepburn hands over command to JB Fitzpatrick

[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Taceval
    • Dawn Patrol
    • Deep Furrow
    • Exit Door
    • Hettie
    • Pedigree
    • Shahbaz
    • Sundial
  • Rangers
    • UK
    • Island
    • Nairobi
    • Malta
    • Ankara
    • Tehran
    • Tengah

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

[Courtesy of Cyprus Years 69 – 71 Group]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents:


1972

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1972

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal
  • Detachment to Masirah

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander JB Fitzpatrick
    • 12/1972: Handed over to Wing Commander KI Watson
Flamingo7crop [Peter Pressland]

KI Watson (left) and JB Fitzpatrick (right)

[Source: Flamingo Magazine]


Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Taceval
    • Dawn Patrol
    • Deep Furrow
    • Easy Life
    • Hettie
    • Pedigree / Midlink
    • Shahbaz
    • Umber
  • Rangers
    • Malta
    • Island
  • Trainers
    • UK
    • Gulf

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

1972 Log Book Extract [Courtesy of Roy Brocklebank)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1973

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1973

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal
  • Detachment to Masirah (05/03/1973 to 12/03/1973)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander KI Watson

Strength

No. 35 Squadron December 1973 [Courtesy of Ken Watson]


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Umber (Teheran) (Regular)
    • Pedigree (March, September and November 1973)
    • Special Flight to New Zealand (March 1973)
    • Dawn Patrol (June 1973)
    • Air Defence Exercise (Malta) (August 1973)
    • Deep Furrow (September 1973)
    • Selwyn (October 1973)
    • Taceval (October 1973)
    • Midlink (November 1973)
    • Air Defence Exercise (Cyprus) (December 1973)
    • Trainers (UK / Gulf)
  • Rangers
    • Malta
    • Masirah
    • Ankara
    • Gan
    • Nairobi
    • Tengah
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Venice (September 1973)
    • Nicosia (September 1973)
    • Firepower Demonstration (Episkopi Bay) (September 1973)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • Strike Command Bombing and Navigation Competition (May 1973)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties
Log Cropped.jpg

Extract from Log Book (Courtesy of W. MacGillivray)


Events

Mount Etna from 9000ft taken from Air Bomber position 31st January 1973


[Courtesy of Roy Brocklebank]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1974

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1974

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal
  • Detached to Shiraz [Iran] (31/05/1974 to 05/06/1974)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander KI Watson

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

It is worth noting that the Cyprus Emergency during the year resulted in flight restrictions, standby alert states and redeployments to Malta and the UK


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercise
    • Pedigree (Masirah) (Regular)
    • Umber (Iran) (Regular)
    • Shahbaz 1974 (May / June 1974)
    • Baker (June 1974)
    • Malta Adex (July 1974)
    • Sundial (October 1974)
  • Rangers
    • Malta
    • Ankara
    • Island
    • Italian / Gulf / UK Trainers
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • CENTO Bombing Demonstration (July 1974)
  • Marine Radar Reconnaissance (during Cyprus Emergency)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents:


1975

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron at RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus until 16th January 1975, when it was posted back to the UK as a result of the Cyprus Emergency. It operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron in the UK from 1st March 1975

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri
  • 16/01/1975: Moved to RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal
  • Detachment to Cyprus (April / May 1975)

Role

  • Up to 16/01/1975
    • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])
  • From 16/01/1975:
    • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
    • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Personnel

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander KI Watson
    • 06/1975: Handed over to Wing Commander AT Atkinson

Wing Commander KI Watson hands over command of the squadron to Wing Commander AT Atkinson

[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

Scampton Redeployment (Extract from the squadron’s Record Book)

“The squadron was informed in December that it was to redeploy to RAF Scampton by 1st February 1975.

To this end, an advance party comprising Sqn Ldr A Ward, Flt Lt JB Ince and Flt Lt. JE Steenson travelled to Scampton on 11th January 1975. The first wave of four aircraft led by Wg Cdr KI Watson and with Sqn Ldr WD MacGillivray, Flt Lt GR Agnew and Flt Lt IGF Lord as captains of the other three aircraft flew to Scampton on 16th January 1975. The aircraft were greeted by the Station Commander Gp Capt JB Fitzpatrick and a reception party representing the station and its resident squadrons. Sqn Ldr ACR Ingoldby, Sqn Ldr Rogers, Flt Lt D Walby, Flt Lt CR Allkins and crews flew the second wave of four aircraft without incident on 23rd January 1975. Fg Off KM O’Sullivan escorted the Squadron Standard and restricted Squadron material to Scampton by 46 Group aircraft on 24th January 1975. The remaining members of the squadron travelled to Scampton by normal service means”

The move from Akrotiri to Scampton has entailed a complete change in the Squadron administrative organisation. Whereas in Cyprus, all ground crew administration was handled by a separate unit, at Scampton, the Squadron has become semi-autonomous with its own ground crew and partial administration for them, as well as responsibility for its own aircraft


Activities

The squadron prepared for its return to the UK (which commenced on the 16th January 1975) and, on arrival, personnel were given 21 days disembarkation leave. It then had to re-qualify all its crews for UK operations (high and low and day and night) before becoming operational on 1st March 1975

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime and Fighter Affiliation Exercise
    • Mick / Sumbal (Regular)
    • Scorer (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Brown Falcon (Regular)
    • Shahbaz / Forearm (Cyprus) (April / May 1975)
    • Crackforce (June 1975)
    • Coldfire (September 1975)
    • Highwood (September 1975)
    • Datex (October 1975)
    • Ocean Safari (November 1975)
  • Rangers / Trainers
    • Goose Bay
    • Malta
    • Italian
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Prestwick (June 1975)
    • Binbrook (July 1975)
    • St Mawgan (August 1975)
    • Yeovilton (September 1975)
    • Ottawa (September 1975)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Ground Personnel (from 16/01/1975)

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

IMG_4213 John Fitzpatrick (CO Scampton) greeting K Watson 16-01-75).JPG

John Fitzpatrick (CO Scampton) greets KI Watson on arrival at Scampton 16th January 1975

[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]



The first aircraft to carry the conjoined 35 (Skyhook) was XL446, when it was flown from Akrotiri to Scampton by KI Watson on 16th January 1975


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from station pool [up to 16/01/1975] and then from its own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1976

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron throughout 1976

XJ824 [1976].jpg

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal
  • Detached to Luqa (December 1976)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander AT Atkinson

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Index (Regular)
    • Mick / Sumbul (Regular)
    • Taceval (Regular)
    • Scorer (Regular)
    • Blue Moon (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Datex (May 1976)
    • Crackforce (June 1976)
    • Joint Maritime Course (July 1976)
    • Active Edge (August 1976)
    • Teamwork (September 1976)
    • Solar Flare (Luqa) (December 1976)
  • Rangers
    • Goose Bay / Offutt
    • Luqa / Akrotiri
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Fairchild Air Display (May 1976)
    • Leicester Air Day (August 1976)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • Double Top (March and April 1976)
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

XH561 at Fairchild Air Display May 1976 [Source: Sal Aguirre]


Wg Cdr Tony Atkinson (CO 35 Squadron) cuts a birthday cake during a buffet dance at Scampton’s Flying Bowman Club, to celebrate the 60 year anniversary of the founding of the squadron


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1977

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron throughout 1977

XL446 at St Mawgan [Copyright John M Boulder With kind permission of Andrew Molland]

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal
  • Detached to RAF St Mawgan (11/071977 to 15/07/1977)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander AT Atkinson
    • 10/06/1977: Handed over to Wing Commander R Sweatman

Wing Commander AT Atkinson handing over to Wing Commander R Sweatman
[Courtesy of Tony Atkinson]


Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Taceval (Regular)
    • Index (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Cavalcade (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Blue Moon (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Datex (Regular)
    • Joint Maritime Course (Regular)
    • Watcon (May 1977)
    • Mandioc (May 1977)
    • Highfield (May 1977)
    • Highwood (July 1977)
    • Ocean Safari (October 1977)
  • Rangers
    • Goose
    • Pacific
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Coningsby Open Day (June 1977)
    • St Truiden, Belgium (June 1977)
    • St Mawgan (July 1977)
    • Royal Review Finningley (July 1977)
    • Chicago (August 1977)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • Double Top (February, March and May 1977)
    • Red Flag (Nellis Air Force Base, USA) (August 1977)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

Royal Review Finningley [Source: airportdata]


During the week 11 – 15 July, 35 Squadron was detached to RAF St Mawgan in support of the Royal College of Defence Studies Visit (13 Jul). and RAF St Mawgan International Air Day (14 Jul). Six crews and six aircraft took part. On both days the squadron launched a four aircraft scramble, one display, flown by Sqn Ldr Jarron and crew and one aircraft was statically displayed.


Presentation of Bristol Siddeley Bombing Trophy, won by Flt Lt Bennett and his Crew


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1978

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron throughout 1978

Squadron aircraft at Luqa (1978) [Aircraft Illustrated]

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Personnel

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander R Sweatman

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime Exercise and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Index (Regular)
    • Mineval (Regular)
    • Taceval (Regular)
    • Cavalcade (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Brown Falcon (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Natinads (Regular)
    • Blue Moon (Regular)
    • Datex (Regular)
    • Joint Maritime Course (Regular)
    • Solar Flare (RAF Luqa) (August 1978)
    • Northern Wedding (September 1978)
    • Active Edge (November 1978)
  • Rangers:
    • Goose
    • Pacific
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Deelen (Holland) (June 1978)
    • Church Fenton (June 1978)
    • Edwards Air Force Base and Hong Kong (November 1978)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • Double Top (May, June and July 1978)
    • Giant Voice (August / September 1978)
    • Red Flag (November / December 1978)
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Extract from a Flying Log Book (November 1978)


Events

Photo taken on August 8th 1978 at Akrotiri, en route to RAF Luqa for MRR Flight

Lieutenants Purchase, Collier, Lindo, Morgan and Squadron Leader Singleton

[Courtesy of Aviation Heritage Research Centre and Bob Lindo]


1978 Red Flag Crew
Bowey (Chief Tech), Keating, Butterworth, Hewitt, Lidbetter, Breeze, Doe (Chief Tech)

[Courtesy of MAHC]


Sqn Ldr Ed Jarron and crew at their Command Crew presentation (March 1978)

[Courtesy of MAHC]


DEELEN AIR SHOW

XM570 Vulcan B.2 at Deelen airbase in the Netherlands on 17th June 1978, during the annual air show

[Photograph with kind permission of Peter Terlouw]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

XL446 at Scampton 1978 [With kind permission of Russ Smith 30.10.2017]

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1979

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron throughout 1979

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander R Sweatman
    • May 1979: Handed over to Wing Commander IO Junor

Strength

May 1979 [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre].jpg

May 1979 [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime Exercises and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Index (Regular)
    • Cavalcade (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Natinads (Regular)
    • Brown Falcon (Regular)
    • Joint Maritime Course (Regular)
    • Spring Train (March 1979)
    • Highwood (July 1979)
    • Coffee Charlie (July 1979)
    • Coldfire (September 1979)
    • Blue Moon (September 1979)
    • Ocean Safari (October 1979)
  • Rangers
    • Goose Bay
    • Pacific
    • Akrotiri
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Queen’s Birthday Flypast (June 1979)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • Double Top (February, May and June 1979)
    • Giant Voice (October / November 1979)
    • Red Flag (December 1979)
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Extract from a Flying Log Book (March 1979)


Events

Wing Commander Junor and his crew flew to Trondheim, Norway on 22nd June 1979 to represent No. 35 Squadron at the unveiling ceremony of a memorial, erected in the Trondheim Fjord, to RAF War heroes involved in the Tirpitz raid of 28th April 1942. The ceremony took place on Sunday 24th June and the crew returned to Scampton on 25th


WG CDR Sweatman presents a painting of a Halifax to the Squadron, watched by John Larder (the artist).

The painting was auctioned off in May 1979


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Vulcan Profile (Low)

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1980

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron throughout 1980

XL443 on Foxtrot Dispersal [Courtesy of Mike O’Gorman]

 Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander IO Junor

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Tacevel (Regular)
    • Index (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Cavalcade (Regular)
    • Blue Moon (Regular)
    • Brown Falcon (Regular)
    • Natinads (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Joint Maritime Course (Regular)
    • No 6 Squadron Air Defence Exercise (March 1980)
    • Teamwork 80 (September 1980)
  • Rangers
    • Goose Bay / Offutt
    • Akrotiri
    • Wildenrath
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Queen’s Birthday Flypast (June 1980)
    • Offutt Air Show
  • Navigation and Bombing Competitions
    • Double Top (May and July 1980)
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

WG CDR Junor receives the Squadron Efficiency Trophy (April 1980)
[Courtesy of MAHC}


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Vulcan Profile (Low)

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

XH561 at Scampton 25th April 1980 [Courtesy of Barny Helen Summerfield]

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1981

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1981 and as a maritime radar reconnaissance squadron until June 1981

XM570 [Courtesy of Richard Pidduck]

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance (until June 1981)

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Personnel

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander IO Junor
    • 15/06/1981: Handed over to Wing Commander NI Hamilton.

Strength


Events effecting the squadron

Throughout the year, the combined effect of the defence cuts and the gradual ageing of the Vulcan resulted in the loss of aircraft that were on charge of the squadron.


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Mineval (Regular)
    • Index (Regular)
    • Datex (Regular)
    • Blue Moon (Regular)
    • Brown Falcon (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Cavalcade / Priory (Regular)
    • Dialect (February 1981)
    • Haricot Vert (December 1981)
  • Rangers
    • Goose Bay / Offutt
    • Istrana
    • Treviso
    • Aviano
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Queen’s Birthday Flypast (June 1981)
    • Vulcan Silver Jubilee (July 1981)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • STC Bombing Competition (May 1981)
    • Double Top (July 1981)
    • No. 35 Squadron vs No. 617 Squadron (August 1981)
    • No. 35 Squadron vs No. 9 Squadron (November 1981)
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance (ceased June 1981)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

IMG_0095

IMPROMPTU FAREWELL TO VULCAN XM570
[Courtesy of Richard Pidduck]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Vulcan Profile (Low)

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1982 (Squadron Disbanded)

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron until 28th February 1982 when it was disbanded

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander NI Hamilton

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

The beginning of the end (Extract from the squadron’s Record Book)

“At the start of 1982, the Vulcan only has 6 months of its 26 years life left. 35 Squadron has only 2 months to go and the station is already feeling the effects of the rundown of the V-Force. At present plans for Scampton are for it to go into care and maintenance, perhaps to reopen as a home for Central Flying School and the Red Arrows. The squadron has eight aircraft at the moment in varying states of repair, although there is no longer much flying expected other than for rangers and Red Flag”


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Rangers
    • Goose Bay / Offutt
  • Navigation and Bombing Competitions
    • Red Flag 82-2 (January / February 1982)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

EXERCISE RED FLAG

Crew 58 represented 35 Squadron as one of the 5 Vulcan crews participating in Exercise Red Flag at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.

Crew: GA Willoughby Crisp (Captain), JA Barden (Co-Pilot), SG Mander (Nav-Radar), GC Daffarn (Nav-Plotter), RW Thompson (AEO)

[With kind permission of Elfed Higgins]


DISBANDMENT PARADE (26th February 1982)

On 26th February 1982, the squadron standard was paraded for the last time before being taken to RAF Cranwell for safe keeping. The final entry in the squadron’s Record Book reads “The Squadron Standard will be taken to RAF Cranwell for safekeeping on Monday 1st March. Sadly, there are no plans for this famous and honourable Squadron to reform”

[Photograph courtesy of Les Ainsley]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Avro Vulcan Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents: