Halifax DT489 (05/10/1942)

Halifax DT489 was one of twelve No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Aachen on the night of the 5th / 6th October 1942.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Harry Burns MacDonald (Pilot)
  • Ronald Edward Wilkes (2nd Pilot)
  • John Baker (Navigator)
  • Edward Whitter (Wireless Operator)
  • Jack Reginald Ely (Air Gunner)
  • George Carpenter (Air Gunner)
  • James Ellis Jones (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Aircraft returned early from 20 miles south of Cambridge after being struck by lightning at 20.00hrs, the trailing aerial breaking off and the Flight Engineer, Sergeant Jones being temporarily blinded by lightning flash. A landing was made with flares still on at Wyton.


Halifax DT488 (20/12/1942)

Halifax DT488 was one of nine No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Duisburg on the night of the 20th / 21st December 1942.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Ronald Edward Wilkes (Pilot)
  • Terence Gordon O’Shaughnessy (Navigator)
  • Ronald Wheatley (Air Bomber)
  • Frederick Hay (Wireless Operator)
  • Frank Walter Vincent (Air Gunner)
  • Michael Albert Edward Bradford (Air Gunner)
  • Thomas Laurie Brown (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Before the aircraft could carry out an attack, it was hit by heavy ‘flak’ in the port inner and starboard outer engines; the D.R. Compass and various electrical leads were severed and the aircraft, flying on only two engines, began to lose height. This occurred when the aircraft was flying at 18,000 feet. The bombload of 8 x 1,000lb and 2 x 500lb G.P. bombs were immediately jettisoned and despite the adverse circumstances, a photograph was at the same time successfully attempted. After further jettisoning of flares and ammunition etc, it was found possible to maintain height at 6,300 feet. At 20.31 hours, the aircraft was sighted and chased by a Ju88, which made three attacks but fired only one burst. Our aircraft was then flying at a reduced speed of only 90 knots, but during the engagement, which lasted four minutes, the Rear Gunner managed to get three bursts and saw strikes in the nose of the enemy aircraft, which finally dived steeply away and was not seen again During both incidents, the entire crew remained very calm and were extremely efficient in jettisoning equipment and combating adversity, the Flight Engineer being outstanding. The Captain finally landed his damaged aircraft skilfully at Martlesham Heath”

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) does not show any information regarding the incident, although the aircraft was not used operationally again until February 1943

AM Form 1180

There is no AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) for this incident; as such, there are no further details available

Canberra WH913 (07/10/1960)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Wing Commander Neubroch, captain of Canberra WH913, whilst landing at Gutersloh after completion of a combined Marshmallow / Lone Ranger exercise on 7th October, ran off the end of the runway and engaged the safety barrier. The aircraft suffered Cat 1 damage. Conditions at the time were continuous rain, low cloud, nil wind and the runway was waterlogged”

Canberra XXXXX (08/04/1958)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “On 8th April, FO Whitelaw and crew were taxying out of for take-off at Luqa when SAC Nevison who was working on a squadron aircraft noticed that FO Whitelaw’s aircraft had a leak in the port tip tank. Air Traffic Control were informed in time to prevent the aircraft from taking off. SAC Nevison is to be commended on his powers of observation and prompt action in stopping take-off “

Wiltshire (TB) (04/04/1918)

TB Wiltshire was killed in action on 4th April 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • 87118 WILTSHIRE, THOMAS BERNARD, Air Mechanic 2nd Class, GENTELLES COMMUNAL CEMETERY Grave 10

Note: No details regarding cause have been found

Uren (CA) (21/03/1918)

CA Uren was killed in action on 21st March 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • 43563 UREN, COURTNEY ARTHUR, Air Mechanic 2nd Class, ARRAS FLYING SERVICES MEMORIAL

Note: No details regarding cause have been found

Summers (JW) (13/11/1918)

JW Summers died of bronchial pneumonia on 13th November 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • 405128 SUMMERS, JW, Air Mechanic 3rd Class, ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN Grave S. III. AA. 5.

Stewart (RMH) (07/11/1918)

RMH Stewart died of influenza on 7th November 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • 2146 STEWART, RMH, Chief Mechanician, ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN Grave S. III. M. 5.

Peacock (R) (21/03/1918)

R Peacock died of wounds received on 21st March 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • PEACOCK, ROBERT, Air Mechanic 1st Class, ARRAS FLYING SERVICES MEMORIAL

Note: No details have been found regarding cause

Hooper (AJ) (05/12/1918)

AJ Hooper died of influenza on 5th December 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • HOOPER, ALFRED JAMES, Private 2nd Class, ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN, Grave S. III. BB. 15.

Claydon (AG) (10/11/1918)

AG Claydon died of illness (at home) on 10th November 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • CLAYDON, ALBERT GLADSTONE A, Air Mechanic 1st Class, HAVERHILL CEMETERY, Grave L. 78.

Caddick (WG) (04/11/1918)

WG Caddick died of broncho-pneumonia on 4th November 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • CADDICK WG, Air Mechanic 2nd Class, ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN S. Grave III. H. 20.

Anthony (HF) (26/04/1918)

HF Anthony died of wounds on 26th April 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • ANTHONY, HUBERT FRANK, Air Mechanic 2nd Class, ST. PIERRE CEMETERY, AMIENS, Grave XIII. B. 2.

Note: No details regarding the circumstances have been found and there is nothing to confirm that he was on strength of No 35 Squadron at the time of his death

Colligan (R) (23/10/1918)

R Colligan died of wounds (to back, buttocks and abdomen) on 23rd October 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • COLLIGAN R, Air Mechanic 2nd Class, QUIETISTE MILITARY CEMETERY, LE CATEAU Grave C. 12.

Note: No details regarding the circumstances have been found and there is nothing to confirm that he was on strength of No 35 Squadron at the time of his death

Halifax W1231 (08/04/1943)

Halifax W1231 was one of eight No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Duisburg on the night of 8th / 9th April 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Harold Cass Pexton (Pilot)
  • Francis Fenton (Navigator)
  • Cyril Duggan Hughes (Air Bomber)
  • Colin John Weldon (Wireless Operator)
  • James Walter Warren (Air Gunner)
  • William David Ronald Walters (Air Gunner)
  • Ernest Frederick John Willis (Flight Engineer)

The Squadron’s Record Book shows “Returned early from Rotterdam (approximately) 23.38 hours, 13,000 feet owing to icing which prevented aircraft climbing even after jettisoning 4 x 1000lb GP; also DR Compass showed error of 120 degrees and Gee went U/S. Cloud up to 12,000 feet all the way to Dutch Coast with icing. 2 x 1000lb GP safe in sea 23.05hrs 9000ft, 5 x 1000lb GP live in sea off Dutch Coast 23.50hrs 12000ft. I x 2000lb HC hung up and fell off on runway on landing”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Graveley Flight Log

In the early hours of the 9th April 1943, a Halifax, U-Uncle was the last to land from operations. This was fortunate because as soon as it touched down, sparks were observed streaming out below the tail. After the aircraft had run a few hundred yards they ceased. An investigation disclosed a 2,000 lb. bomb on the centre of the main runway, near Flying Control. It had been hung up by its tail and when the aircraft touched down its nose was dragged along the runway until the bumps caused it to fall off. At dawn an airman was seen to be sitting on it smoking a cigarette, his job being to keep the inquisitive away.

AM Form 78

Halifax W7885 (03/01/1943)

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 3rd January 1943.

There were no operational sorties recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book for that day, so it is assumed that any damage was sustained during exercises. The aircraft was operational again by 4th February 1943


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) is confusing, as it suggests that it was on charge of No 105 Squadron, but they were flying Mosquito at the time

AM Form 1180

There is no AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) for the incident, so no further information is available

Halifax W7878 (29/03/1943)

Halifax W7878 was one of seventeen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Berlin on the night of 29th / 30th March 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Oscar William Rees (Pilot)
  • Ronald George Hands (Navigator)
  • Vernon Reginald Matthews (Air Bomber)
  • Arthur Denby Barker (Wireless Operator)
  • Ivor Corfield (Air Gunner)
  • Thomas Henry Navin Emerson (Air Gunner)
  • George Henry Cross (Flight Engineer)

The Squadron’s Record Book shows “Berlin at 19500ft, hit repeatedly by HFF; starboard outer and port hit. On run up, aircraft subjected to considerable amount of heavy flak. After dropping TIs, coned in a heavy flak which put starboard inner engine out of action and riddled aircraft from nose to tail, hitting petrol tanks. Also starboard and port outer hit, fortunately not putting these out of action. Landed Coltishall”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 30th March 1943 and it was sent for repair; it was returned to the squadron on 27th May 1943

AM Form 1180

There is no AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) for this incident, so no further details are available

Halifax W7878 (30/01/1943)

Halifax W7878 was one of three No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Hamburg on the night of the 30th / 31st January 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Oscar William Rees (Pilot)
  • Herbert Brian Felix  Lymna (Observer / Navigator)
  • Vernon Reginald Matthews (Air Bomber)
  • Arthur Denby Barker (Wireless Operator / [WOP/AG])
  • Ivor Corfield (Air Gunner)
  • Leonard Jesse North (Air Gunner)
  • John Maurice Mitchell (Flight Engineer)

There are no details of any damage recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book but the AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows: “Aircraft landing, strong cross wind xxxxx swung off runway; unable to check aircraft to avoid hitting unmarked defence post”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 31st January 1943; it was sent for repair and returned to the squadron on 11th February 1943

Halifax W7872 (31/01/1943)

The AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows “Sgt. Fitter (H Wasley) taxying aircraft to dispersal in the dark without assistance collided with tail of W7875 standing on perimeter track”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The Movement Card (AM Form 78) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 31st January 1943. It was sent for repair and returned to the squadron on 13th February 1943

Halifax W7866 (20/12/1942)

Halifax W7866 was one of nine No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Duisburg on the night of the 20th / 21st December 1942.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Geoffrey Norman Reeve (Pilot)
  • Elmer Harold Anthony (Navigator)
  • Stanley Alfred Miller (Air Bomber)
  • Harry James Leonard Peto (Wireless Operator)
  • Lloyd George Lawson (Air Gunner)
  • William Scott Minto Edmondston (Air Gunner)
  • George Richard Bradley (Flight Engineer)

There are no details of any damage recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book, but the AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows “After landing, undercarriage collapsed; no defect (It cannot be assumed that the pilot did not lock undercarriage but in view of doubt and pilots clean record, no further action”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 21st December 1942; it adds that the aircraft was sent for repair and was not returned to the squadron

Halifax W7779 (20/04/1943)

Halifax W7779 was one of thirteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Stettin on the night of the 20th / 21st April 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • John Rushbrooke Petrie-Andrews (Pilot)
  • John Wright Armitage (Navigator)
  • Horace John Backhouse (Air Bomber)
  • Rhubean Burns Berwick (Wireless Operator)
  • George Dale (Air Gunner)
  • Norman Wilken Barnett (Air Gunner)
  • John Henry Morgan (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows: Shell exploded in nose of aircraft at 5459N 1053E at 23.57 hours whilst at 1000ft. Bomb Sight, air speed indicator, DR Compass and inter-com all made unserviceable. Wireless Operator and Navigator were wounded


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 21st April 1943; it was sent for repair and returned to the squadron on 24th May 1943

AM Form 1180

There is no AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) available; as such, there are no further details

Armitage and Berwick

Both airmen returned to operational service with the squadron shortly after the incident

Halifax W7778 (08/03/1943)

Halifax W7778 was one of eleven No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Nurnburg on 8th / 9th March 1943

Its six man crew consisted of:

  • George Frank Lambert (Pilot)
  • Gordon Davidson Hogg (Navigator)
  • James Errol Philip Doll (Air Bomber)
  • Ronald Arnold Kempsell (Wireless Operator)
  • Samuel James Knight (Air Gunner)
  • Anthony Claude Beddoe (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows: At Longuyon, 21.38 hours, 13500ft, attacked by JU88, port inner oil tank holed. Port flap approx. 2ft shot away, rear turret U/S due to oil leak. Port inner bomb door shot off and port inner propeller damaged. Sortie abandoned as still over 200 miles from target


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 8th March 1943; the aircraft was sent for repair and was returned to the squadron on 22nd March 1943

(Note: The AM Form 78 suggests that it was not returned to the squadron until 22nd April 1943; however the squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that it was operational again from 22nd March)

AM Form 1180

There is no AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) for this incident; as such, there are no further details available

Halifax W7778 (29/05/1943)

Halifax W7778 was one of twenty-one No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Wuppertal on 29th / 30th May 1943

Its seven man crew consisted of:

  • Nelson Alexander Cobb (Pilot)
  • David Archibald Codd (Navigator)
  • Walter Palfrey Trask (Air Bomber)
  • Charles Henry Bulloch (Wireless Operator)
  • Norman Francis Williams (Air Gunner)
  • Thomas Richard Desmond Smith (Air Gunner)
  • Roland Hurlston Baldwin (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows: Aircraft hit by flak. Port tyre burst and aircraft crashed, belly landing at base


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 29th May 1943. The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and sent to Handley Page for repair. It was not returned to the squadron on completion of repairs

AM Form 1180

There is no AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) for this incident; as such, there are no further details available

Extract from “Blue Job – Brown Job” by David Codd DFC

“Over the target area we had felt a considerable bump when our aircraft was hit. The elevator had suffered some damage but not enough to make the aircraft unflyable. We got back to base without too much trouble but when we made our final approach to touch down we had a nasty shock. Unbeknown to us, the port undercarriage and tyre had been damaged. As we hit the runway, the aircraft slewed off to the left and both legs of the undercarriage sheared off as it went into a ground loop, finishing with a belly landing on the grass. Fortunately, none of the crew were injured and the aircraft was sufficiently clear of the runway to allow other returning aircraft to land safely”.

Halifax W7711 (12/05/1943)

Halifax W7711 was one of twenty No. 35 Squadron aircraft that were detailed to attack Duisburg on 12th / 13th May 1943

Its seven man crew comprised:

  • Peter Johnston (Pilot)
  • Reginald Gordon Houston (Navigator)
  • Roy Wood (Air Bomber)
  • Benjamin Thomas Royall (Wireless Operator)
  • Harold John Rogers (Air Gunner)
  • Charles Fullerton Stewart (Air Gunner)
  • Frederick James Jarvis (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows: Gee and Navigational Aid U/S. Duisburg 02.03 hours, 15500ft heavy flak shell near miss. Utrecht 10 miles WNW 02.45, 8000ft – tracer from enemy aircraft


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The Movement Card (AM Form 78) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 13th May 1943; the aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and sent to Handley Page for repair. It was not returned to the squadron on completion of repairs

AM Form 1180

There is no AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) for this incident; as such, there is no further information available

Halifax HR987 (01/09/1943)

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 1st September 1943.

The squadron’s Operations Record Book has no information regarding any damage sustained


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 1st September 1943 (possibly whilst being utilised by 158 Squadron?) ; it is unclear when it was returned to the squadron, but it was operational on 8th September 1943

AM Form 1180

There is no AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) for this incident; as such, there is no further information available

Halifax HR987 (27/09/1943)

Halifax HR987 was one of twenty-one aircraft No. 35 Squadron detailed to attack Hanover on the night of 27th / 28th September 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Brian Guinness Glover (Pilot)
  • Edmund Howard Williams (Navigator)
  • John Brett (Air Bomber)
  • Arthur William Griffiths (Wireless Operator)
  • Philip Charles Potter (Air Gunner)
  • William Carroll Connelly (Air Gunner)
  • Thomas Smith Redpath (Flight Engineer)

The squadron Operations Record Book does not contain any information about damage but the AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows “Damaged by incendiaries over the target”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC. It was allocated to Handley Page (for repair) and was not returned to the squadron.

Murray (JDH) (02/01/1945)

John Douglas Haig Murray died on active service on 2nd January 1945 (see Casualty Communique No. 501 Flight 10th May 1945)

There are no details recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book and it is unclear whether he died as a result of illness or an accident.

 

The CWGC’s records show the following burial details:

  • MURRAY, JOHN DOUGLAS HAIG ‘949532’ NEW MONKLAND CEMETERY Sec. F. Grave 74.

Wild (RH) (29/03/1945)

Robert Henry Wild died on active service on 29th March 1945.

There are no details recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book and it is unclear whether he died as a result of illness or an accident.

The CWGC’s records show the following burial details:

  • WILD, ROBERT HENRY ‘1145716’ BRAMLEY (ST. PETER) CHURCHYARD Screen Wall. 2nd new Sec. Row 2. Grave 3.

Halifax L9569 (09/12/1941 [Non Op])

Halifax L9569 was being flown by RA Norman and crew (Night Exercise) on 9th December 1941.

The AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows “Tail wheel collapsed on landing causing swing; suspected severe tail wheel …………. . Isolated case in this squadron although experienced in 765 Squadron and Conversion Flight; failure to be watched in future.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was sent for repair; it was returned to the squadron on 31 January 1942

AM Form 1180

Lancaster ND929 (08/05/1944)

Lancaster ND929 was one of fourteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Haine-St-Pierre on the night of the 8th / 9th May 1944.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • John Forde (Pilot)
  • John Henry Rollins (Navigator)
  • Herbert William Warner (Air Bomber)
  • Donald Carruthers (Wireless Operator)
  • Victor Arthur Roe (Air Gunner)
  • William Thomas Quirke (Air Gunner)
  • Douglas Aubrey Cole (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows: “Aircraft attacked by JU88 and had to corkscrew; this made aircraft late and had to do a dummy run”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 shows that the aircraft was classified as Cat AC ROS on 9th May 1944. It was repaired and returned to the squadron on 27th May 1944

AM Form 1180

There isn’t an AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) held at the RAF Museum and, as such, it has not been possible to establish any more details

Lancaster ND929 (24/07/1944)

Lancaster ND929 was one of sixteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Stuttgart on 24th / 25th July 1944.

The crew comprised:

  • Douglas Lawrence Knobloch (Pilot)
  • John Maule (Navigator)
  • Francis Herbert Thomas McNally (Air Bomber)
  • Ronald George Pain (Wireless Operator)
  • James Arthur Bowen (Air Gunner)
  • Reginald Noah Collins (Air Gunner)
  • James William Street (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “On return, H2S failed completely – bomb door could not be closed, despite use of emergency air lock. Cruised at 147 knots. At approximately … found fuel getting short, estimated three hours fuel left. Consumption on starboard side appeared abnormal. After further fuel shortage, two starboard engines feathered over beach-head. Landed at Thorney Island with 20 gallons left”.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 shows that the aircraft was classified at Cat. AC ROS and was repaired and returned to the squadron on 5th August 1944

AM Form 1180

Unreadable text – further work required to decipher


Lancaster ND936 (22/07/1944)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Eight aircraft were detailed to attack constructional works at L’Hey but one, captained by E Hislop, swung on take off and crashed”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 1180

The AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows “swung on take-off and undercarriage collapsed”

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 shows that the aircraft was classified as Cat AC; it was repaired on site and returned to the squadron on 25th August 1944

1962 (Squadron Reformed)

No 35 Squadron reformed as the sixth Vulcan Mk2 Squadron in No 1 Group, Bomber Command and as the third and final “V” Squadron at RAF Coningsby on 1st November 1962. The Air Ministry subsequently changed the official reformation date to 1st December 1962

Stationed at:

  • RAF Coningsby (Lincolnshire)

Role:

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing

Command

  • Coningsby Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander AA Smailes AFC

Strength

35 Squadron Research Image

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that on 1st November 1962 “Wing Commander AA Smailes (Squadron Commander) and his crew, Flight Lieutenant GG Ness and his crew, Squadron Leader GC Goodyer (A Flight Commander), Squadron Leader DA Thomas (B Flight Commander) and Squadron Leader D Craig (C Flight Commander), together with 25 senior NCOs and airmen, were present for a Squadron photograph. A welcoming message was then given by the Station Commander”
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Activities

  • Logistics
    • A small number of personnel were employed in setting up barracks, offices, dispersal offices, aircraft stands and rigs and preparing training material.
  •  Air Crew Training
    • There was a limited amount of flying training carried out at RAF Scampton
  • Target Study
    • In December, all aircrew started their Target Study
  • QRA
    • AA Smailes and his crew carried out the squadron’s first QRA in December 1962

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (which were initially loaned from other squadrons):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The squadron had none of its establishment number of six on charge in 1962; all flying was carried out using loaned aircraft from RAF Scampton

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on loan to, or on charge of, the squadron, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1963

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron, with QRA capability, throughout 1963

 Stationed at:

  • RAF Coningsby (Lincolnshire)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing

Command

  • Coningsby Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Wing Commander AA Smailes AFC
    • 16/04/1963: Handed over to Wing Commander DB Craig

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • War Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Training Programme included: Overshoots, Practice Diversion, Instrument Landing (ILS), Ground Control Approach (GCA), Precision Approach Radar (PAR), Navigation and Bombing System (NBS) / Radar Bomb Score (RBS) Attacks, Live Bombing, Navigation (Limited / Secondary / Primary), Visual Bombing, Formation Flying, Fighter Affiliation, Maximum All Up Weight Take Off, 1500 mile / Maximum Length Profile and ECM Runs
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Fairway (February / March 1963)
    • Mayflight (May 1963)
    • Mystic (July 1963)
    • Mick (August 1963)
    • Kinsman (September 1963)
    • Lion Vert (September 1963)
    • Mickey Finn (November 1963)
    • Lime Jug (December 1963)
  • Rangers
    • Western
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Freedom of Boston Flypast (May 1963)
    • RAF Honington (June 1963)
    • Demonstration Scramble [Andover] (October 1963)
    • Demonstration Scramble [Coningsby] (October 1963)
  • Bombing Competitions

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Events

Leader R Dick (No. 9 Squadron), No. 2 Position GG Ness (No. 35 Squadron) and No. 3 Position N Steel (No. 12 Squadron) in Freedom of Boston Flypast 16th May 1963
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (which were initially loaned and then from own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The squadron took delivery of its first “establishment” Avro Vulcan B2 (XJ823) in January 1963, although this was then passed to a Modification Team for “Rapid Start” modifications. As a result, it continued to use aircraft from other squadrons for flying training, initially using aircraft from Scampton and then aircraft from No. 9 and No. 12 Squadron (also based at Coningsby), whilst it built up its own establishment of six aircraft.

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on loan to, or on charge of, the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1964

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron, with QRA capability, throughout 1964

 Stationed at:

  • RAF Coningsby (Lincolnshire)
  • 02/11/1964: Moved to RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (changed to low level in February)

Command

  • Coningsby Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command
  • 02/11/1964: Transferred to Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • DB Craig

Strength

(#) In March 1964, all technical and engineering work (including daily servicing of squadron aircraft) was transferred to the station Technical Wing (Centralised Servicing), leaving only Administration Personnel on strength of the squadron


Activities

Air Crew

  • War Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Training Programme included: 1500 mile / Maximum Length Profile, Navigation and Bombing System (NBS) / Radar Bomb Score (RBS) Attacks, Live Bombing, Practice Diversion, Navigation (Limited / Secondary / Primary), Formation Flying, Fighter Affiliation and ECM Runs. Low level attack was introduced in February 1964 and in-flight refuelling (in readiness for Far East commitments) was introduced in May 1964
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Kinsman (Regular)
    • Mick (January 1964)
    • Phoenix (January 1964)
    • Teamwork [NATO Exercise] (September 1964)
    • Mickey Finn (October 1964)
    • Statex (November 1964)
  • Rangers
    • Wildenrath
    • Akrotiri
    • Luqa
    • Western
    • Goose Bay
    • Butterworth (Malaysia)
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Demonstration Scramble [Wittering] (February 1964)
    • RCAF National Air Force Day [Rockcliffe, Ottawa] (May / June 1964)
    • RAF Marham (June 1964)
    • RAF Honington (July 1964)
    • Battle of Britain [RAF Finningley] (September 1964)
    • Independence Celebrations [Malta] (September 1964)
    • Farewell to Boston Parade (October 1964)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Squadron Bombing Competition

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations (up until March 1964)
  • Administrative Duties

Events

XM607 at RAF Luqa 1964

[With kind permission of Jim Simpson]


This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is xm645-at-coningsby-1965-courtesy-of-doug-charnley-on-fb-but-not-the-owner.jpg

In March, centralised servicing was introduced and aircraft from the three Coningsby squadrons (No. 9, 12 and 35 Squadron) were incorporated into a common “station pool” and then allocated to crews to meet each squadron’s daily flying programme. This resulted in the loss of squadron markings on the tailplane, although the Coningsby / Cottesmore Wing and Squadron badges were included on the entrance door.

XM645 at Coningsby (showing the Wing and Squadron Badges on the entrance door)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from own establishment and then from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


With advancements in surface to air missiles, it was necessary to change the method of attack to “low level”. As a result, navigational equipment was adapted, the aircraft camouflage was changed and squadron crews started to train in the new procedures in February 1964.

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, or available from a station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1965

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron, with QRA capability, throughout 1965

Stationed at:

  • RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing

Command

  • Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander DB Craig
    • 01/06/1965: Handed over to Wing Commander DA Arnott DFC

Wing Commander DA Arnott DFC


Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Training Programme included: Low Level, Hi-Lo-Hi, 1500 Mile / Maximum Length Training Profile, Visual Bombing, Navigation and Bombing System (NBS) / Radar Bomb Score (RBS) Attacks, Live Bombing, Navigation (Limited / Secondary / Primary), Practice Diversion, Fighter Affiliation and ECM Runs.
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kinsman (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Billion (Regular)
    • Spherical (Muharraq, Gan, Tengah, Butterworth) (April / May 1965)
    • Kingpin (June 1965)
    • Mickey Finn (July 1965)
    • Tiger Cub (July 1965)
    • Alpine (August 1965)
    • Unison (August / September 1965)
    • Donovan (October 1965)
    • Statex (December 1965)
  • Rangers
    • Wildenrath
    • Gardermoen
    • Idris
    • Luqa
    • El Adem
    • Western
    • Goose
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Battle of Britain Day Demonstration Scramble [Cottesmore] (September 1965)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • No 1 Group Medium Bomber Competition

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Events

IMG_0764.JPG

Aircraft from the squadron at Butterworth during Operation Spherical (April / May 1965)
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


1965 Training Exercise © IWM (RAF-T 5756)

Avro Vulcan B2 XM599 of No 35 Squadron based at RAF Cottesmore releases a full bomb load of twenty-one 1000lb bombs, during an exercise in 1965.
[© IWM RAF-T 5756]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from Cottesmore Pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available from the station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1961 (Squadron Disbanded)

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron until 11th September 1961 when it was disbanded

Stationed at:

  • RAF Upwood (Cambridgeshire)
  • Detached Idris (Spring “Sunspot” 20/02/1961 to 21/03/1961)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit) (*)

(*) Assigned to NATO’s Supreme Allied Commander in Europe for operational and targeting purposes)


Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander H Neubroch OBE

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Marshmallow (Regular)
    • Statex (Regular)
    • Mantis (Regular)
    • Polar Bear (Regular)
    • Thorn (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Regex 61 (March 1961)
    • May Flight IV / Matador (May 1961)
    • Co-Op (June 1961)
    • Fairwind (June 1961)
  • Rangers (*)
    • Eastleigh
    • El Adem
    • Gibraltar
    • Jever
    • Laarbruch
    • Salisbury (Southern Rhodesia)
    • Thornhill
    • Wildenrath / Laarbruch
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Bagington / Hullavington (July 1961)
    • Photographic Sorties for BBC and Flight Magazine (August 1961)
    • Farnborough (September 1961)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • NEAF Bombing and Navigation Competition (RAF Akrotiri)

(*) Note: From July, all Lone Rangers crossing the Mediterranean were cancelled due to the situation in Kuwait.

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Events

AOC Inspection (June 1961)
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Squadron Commanders’ Remarks (September 1961)

“All tasks arising before disbandment – flying, administrative, ceremonial and social were completed in full. It merely remains for me to wish our successors on No. 35 Squadron, joy and success – may all their runs be straight and true”


Message from the Air Officer Commanding (13th September 1961)

My grateful thanks to you and all those officers and airmen who have served in No. 35 Squadron whilst it has been in my Group. The squadron has performed splendid service and it has never failed to achieve what has been asked of it. My best wishes to you all in the future”


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

CANBERRA B.2 and T.4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

In January, the squadron started the process of replacing all frangible hatches, with metal hatches. In February, all squadron aircraft with frangible hatches (WK130, WJ635, WJ732, WJ751, WH918 and WH920) were grounded until replacement hatches were fitted.

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on losses and incidents:


1960

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1960

Stationed at:

  • RAF Upwood
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (Spring “Sunspot” 29/03/1960 to 10/05/1960)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander G Newberry
    • 18/07/1960: Handed over to Wing Commander H Neubroch OBE

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness and Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Marshmallow (Regular)
    • Cadmin (Regular)
    • Bombex (Regular)
    • Statex (Regular)
    • Argus (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Thorn (Regular)
    • Polar Bear (Regular)
    • Baccy (February 1960)
    • Arkex (April 1960)
    • Fawley (April 1960)
    • Regex (May 1960)
    • Yeoman (May 1960)
    • Fair Wind (June 1960)
    • Co-Op (August 1960)
    • Flashback (September 1960)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Bahrain
    • Cyprus
    • Eastleigh
    • Gibraltar
    • Gutersloh
    • Idris
    • Luqa
    • Thornhill
    • Salisbury
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • RAF Cottesmore (May 1960 [Static])
    • RAF Colitishall (August 1960 [Static])
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September 1960)
    • RAF Leconfield (September 1960)
  • Bombing Competitions

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Events

IMG_0730 1960 [MAHC]

Squadron personnel and aircraft on parade 1960
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Canberra WH913 over Malta (Sunspot 1960)
[Air Pictorial]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

CANBERRA B2 and T4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

On 15th February 1960, all Canberra aircraft were grounded pending the incorporation of a modification to the elevator spring tab operating rod. This modification and inspection also included the dropping of the tip tanks and Mod 2107. All aircraft were modified and air tested by 22nd February 1960

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on losses and incidents:


1959

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1959

Stationed at:

  • RAF Upwood (Cambridgeshire)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (Spring “Sunspot” 27/01/1959 to 24/02/1959)
  • Detached to St Mawgan (16/03/1959 to 24/03/1959)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (Autumn “Sunspot” 19/10/1959 to 24/11/1959)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander G Newberry

G Newberry 1959 [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Marshmallow (Regular)
    • Cadmin (Regular)
    • Bombex (Regular)
    • Statex (Regular)
    • Argus (Regular)
    • Groupex (Regular)
    • Dawn Breeze (March 1959)
    • Buckboard (April 1959)
    • Topweight (April 1959)
    • Thorn (April 1959)
    • Fair Wind (June 1959)
    • Mandate (July 1959)
    • Sledge (October 1959)
    • Sambar / Longhaul (October 1959)
    • Druggett (December 1959)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Akrotiri
    • Eastleigh, Kenya
    • Gibraltar
    • Gütersloh, Germany
    • Idris, Libya
    • Khormaskar, Aden
    • Thornhill, Rhodesia
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Presentation of Standard Flypast (June 1959)
    • ITV programme “Swansong” [12 seconds of footage incl. in the programme]
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September 1959)
  • Bombing Competitions

October Flying Log Book Extract (Courtesy of Richard MacNeil)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

Practice for the ITV Programme Swansong August 1959 [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre].jpg

Practice for the ITV Programme “Swansong” August 1959
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


On 16th June 1959, the Squadron Standard was presented by Princess Alexandra of Kent at a drumhead ceremony

– more details –


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

CANBERRA B2 and T4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

In August 1959, all Canberra were subject to a radiographic examination of their undercarriage, following failures of the grub screw which locked the outer piston to the sliding tube of the oleo leg assembly (defect signal 899/Eng 2/3 dated 28th August 1959). This resulted in the grounding of some of the squadron aircraft until modification had been carried out

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on losses and incidents:


1958

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1958

Stationed at:

  • RAF Upwood (*)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (04/03/1958 to 10/04/1958)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (09/09/1958 to 08/10/1958 )

    (*) Detached to RAF Coningsby whilst main runway at Upwood was resurfaced (October 1958)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RG Price DFC
    • 03/02/1958: Handed over to Wing Commander G Newberry

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Marshmallow (Regular)
    • Cadmus (Regular)
    • Bombex (Regular)
    • Brief (February 1958)
    • Green Cobra (March 1958)
    • Starshot (May 1958)
    • Fullplay (June 1958)
    • Wearaway (July 1958)
    • Crescent Hinge (October 1958)
    • Sunbeam (October 1958)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Ahlhorn
    • Gibraltar
    • Habbaniya
    • Idris
    • Luqa
    • Nicosia
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • International Air Show, Basel (September 1958)
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September 1958)
  • Bombing Competitions

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

The squadron also carried out ferry flights, delivering aircraft to Australia (August 1958)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

CANBERRA B2 and T4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available to the squadron from a station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:


1957

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1957

Stationed at:

  • RAF Upwood (Cambridgeshire)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (11/03/1957 to 08/04/1957)
  • Detached to Luqa, Malta (09/09/1957 to 04/10/1957)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RG Price DFC

Strength

Notes: In February 1957, the squadron amalgamated with No 18 Squadron and it sub divided into 3 Flights (A, B and C)


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness and Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Port Wine (August 1957)
    • Counterpunch (September 1957)
    • Deepwater (September 1957)
    • Phoenix (November 1957)
    • Orpen (December 1957)
    • Goldflake
    • Marshmallow
    • Vigilant
  • Lone Rangers
    • El Adem
    • Gibraltar
    • Idris
    • Luqa, Malta
    • Habbaniya
    • Wunstorf
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Farnborough (September 1957)
  • Bombing Competitions

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Events

Life on the squadron

An article by John Kirk regarding his time with the squadron
– Life on the Squadron –


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

CANBERRA B2 and T4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available to the squadron from a station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1956

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1956

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)
  • 24/07/1956: Moved to RAF Upwood (Huntingdonshire)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Marham Wing, Main Force, Bomber Command
  • 24/07/1956: Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader TA McCulloch
    • 05/03/1956: Handed over to Squadron Leader RG Price DFC

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

The Canberra aircraft were grounded from March to July, resulting in reduced flying activities.

In July, President Nasser of Egypt seized control of the Suez Canal and the UK, along with other countries, prepared to bring the Canal back under international control, utilising force, if necessary. During late July and August, the Canberra squadrons were utilised to ferry bombs for storage in Luqa, Malta (Operation Accumulate); there is no reference to this operation in No. 35 Squadron’s Operations Record Book

In October, a task force was deployed to Malta and Cyprus (Operation Musketeer) and the squadron was put on “standby”.  The offensive against President Nasser commenced on 30th October 1956, concluding on 5th November 1956. Whilst four of the squadron’s aircraft deployed to Cyprus, the squadron does not figure in the UK Battle Order for Operation Musketeer.


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Fusillade (March 1956)
    • Marshmallow (March 1956)
    • Stronghold (September 1956)
    • Whipsaw (September 1956)
    • Ratchet (October 1956)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Abu Sueir
    • Aden
    • Bahrain
    • Eastleigh
    • Gibraltar
    • Habbaniya
    • Idris
    • Khormaksar
    • Luqa
    • Nicosia
    • Wunstorf
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • None Recorded
  • Bombing Competitions
    • None Recorded

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations (up until October 1956)
  • Administrative Duties

Queen at Marham 1956 ([Movietone News).jpg

Queen Elizabeth II at Marham 23rd July 1956 [Source: Movietone News]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment until October 1956 and then from a station pool):

Canberra Profile

CANBERRA B.2 and T.4

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that the introduction of centralised servicing in October 1956 resulted in the squadron using aircraft from the station pool and, as a result, the squadron badge no longer appeared on the tail fin.

On 5th March 1956, all aircraft were grounded until the electrical wiring to the tail plane actuators had been checked and modified. They were grounded again on 29th March 1956 awaiting further modifications to the tail plane actuators; the squadron started to receive the modified versions in July 1956.

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available to the squadron, firstly from its own establishment and then from a station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:


1955

The squadron operated as a light bomber squadron throughout 1955

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)

Role

  • Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RS Sanders DFC AFC
    • 06/06/1955:  Handed over to Squadron Leader JR Musgrave DSO
    • 04/11/1955: Handed over to Squadron Leader TA McCulloch

Strength


Events affecting 35 Squadron

In January, the squadron became the first fully operational squadron at Marham, when the last crew achieved its combat classification; this was nine months after starting its conversion to the Canberra


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Sky High (April 1955)
    • Carte Blanche (June 1955)
    • Beware / Foxpaw (September 1955)
    • Phoenix
  • Lone Rangers
    • Gibraltar
    • Idris
    • Malta
    • Nairobi
    • Shaibah
    • Wunstorf
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Marham (Various Dates)
    • Cranwell (March 1955)
    • Biggin Hill (June 1955)
    • Geneva (June 1955)
    • Upwood (July 1955)
    • Farnborough (July 1955)
    • Baginton (August 1955)
    • Benson (October 1955)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Bomber Command Competition (March 1955)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Events

No. 35 Squadron display in Geneva 1955
[Source FlightGlobal 1st July 1955]


Carte Blanche
In the last week of June 1955, around 3000 NATO aircraft from Canada, Denmark, Greece, France, Norway, the UK and USA took part in the largest allied exercise held since the Second World War. The exercise, which was held in West Germany, included the simulated use of tactical nuclear weapons against airfields and troop concentrations.


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Canberra Profile

CANBERRA B2 and T4

Canberra Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1954

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron and then as a light bomber squadron during 1954

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)

Role

  • Medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron
  • 28/04/1954: Light bomber squadron, equipped for high altitude strategic bombing (SACEUR assigned unit)

Command

  • No. 3 Group, Bomber Command
  • 28/04/1954: Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RS Sanders DFC AFC

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

Throughout the year, squadron personnel continued conversion training on jet aircraft (at Weston Zoyland) in readiness for the move away from piston engine aircraft and at Bassingbourn / Lindholme for Canberra conversion.

In September, the first four crews (Stirrup, Millett, Rushforth and Crawford) achieved “Combat” status on the Canberra


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Dividend (July 1954)
    • Battle Royal (September 1954)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Gibraltar
    • Idris
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September 1954)
  • Bombing Competitions

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

The squadron continued ferry flights, returning the Washington aircraft back to the USA (Operation “Home Run”) until the end of March 1954


Events

BOMB EXPLOSION

On 20th September 1954, two 1,000lb bombs exploded on the perimeter track at Marham, killing an NCO
– more details –


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

BOEING B-29 [WASHINGTON]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


CANBERRA B.2 and T.4

On 28th April 1954, the squadron started to re-equip with the Canberra B2 (plus the T4 for dual-purpose training) [Establishment: 10 Aircraft]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following links provide more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:


1953

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron throughout 1953

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)

Role

  • Medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron

Command

  • No 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader FR Flynn AFC
    • 01/09/1953: Squadron Leader RS Sanders DFC AFC

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Jungle King (March 1953)
    • Momentum (August 1953)
  • Lone Rangers
    • Idris and Habbaniya
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Royal Review (Odiham July 1953)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Visual Bombing Contest (May 1953)
    • Lawrence Minot Visual Bombing Competition (September 1943)
    • Blind Bombing Competition (November 1953)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Events

odiham-1953-source-washington-times

One of the squadron’s Washington (WF572) on display at Odiham
[Source: Washington Times by Chris Howlett]

In July, the squadron commenced ferry flights, returning the Washington aircraft back to the USA (Operation “Home Run”)

During September / October, the squadron carried servicing personnel, spares and equipment to various bases along the route of the London to Christchurch air race.

In December, squadron personnel started conversion training on jet aircraft (at Weston Zoyland) in readiness for the move away from piston engined aircraft.


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Washington Profile

BOEING B-29 [WASHINGTON]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1952

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron throughout 1952

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)

Role

  • Training replacement crews for the Washington Squadrons (A Flight)
  • Medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron (B Flight)

Note: On 16th June 1952, with the squadron up to operational strength, A Flight was renamed the Washington Conversion Unit and B Flight was split into A and B Flights


Command

  • No. 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader FR Flynn AFC

Strength


Activities

A Flight (renamed Washington Conversion Unit on 16/06/1952)

  • Training replacement crews for the Washington Squadrons

B Flight (split into A and B Flight on 16/06/1952)

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Bait (Regular)
    • Bullseye (June 1952)
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Jigsaw (August 1952)
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue
    • Aid to Meteor Pilot 20 miles north of Yarmouth 24/07/1952
    • Search for Balliol aircraft from West Bay 14/08/1952
    • Search for two meteors off Flamborough Head 11/12/1952
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Battle of Britain Flypast
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Blind Bombing Competition (December 1952)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Extract from G Beattie’s Log Book [Courtesy of Robert Beattie]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Washington Profile

BOEING B-29 [WASHINGTON]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1951 (Squadron Reformed)

No. 35 Squadron (as part of the Washington Training Unit) was responsible for training crews to fly the Boeing B-29a [Washington]. The Unit completed its task of converting seven squadrons to Washington aircraft on 21st July 1951 and on 1st September 1951, the identity of No. 35 Squadron was assumed (having previously been placed into number plate status)

Stationed at:

  • RAF Marham (Norfolk)

Role

  • From September 1951
    • Ongoing training of replacement crews for the Washington Squadrons (A Flight)
    • Medium bomber and standby Air Sea Rescue squadron (B Flight)

Note: Up until September 1951, personnel were training crews to fly the Boeing B-29a [Washington] (as part of the Washington Training Unit)


Command

  • No 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader FR Flynn AFC

Strength (from September 1951)

Unknown 35 Squadron crew
[Source: Washington Times]


Activities (from 1st September 1951)

A Flight

  • Training replacement crews for the Washington Squadrons

B Flight

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Exercise Bait (December)
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September 1951)

(#) All information prior to this date would have been recorded in the Washington Training Unit Record Book

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Washington Profile

BOEING B-29 [WASHINGTON]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on the known losses and incidents:

1919 (Squadron Disbanded)

The squadron was reduced to “cadre” status on 19th January 1919. It returned to the UK in March 1919 and disbanded on 26th June 1919


Stationed at:

  • France
    • La Bellevue, France
    • 19/01/1919: Moved to St Marie-Cappel, France
  • UK
    • 03/03/1919: Moved to Netheravon, Wiltshire (for the purposes of disbandment)

La Bellevue [Source: 49squadron.co.uk]


Role

As a Corps Squadron, No. 35 Squadron was tasked with providing medium and short distance aerial reconnaissance for one of the British Army Corps Commands.


Command


Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Major DF Stevenson DS0 MC

Strength (Cadre Status)


Activities (Up to 3rd March 1919)

Air Crew

  • Post War Monitoring
  • Ground Training and Flying Training (*)
  • Preparations for return to the UK

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

(*) There are no pages in the Record Book for 1919, but is assumed that the squadron continued with activities such as Photography, Reconnaissance and Camera Gun until its return to the UK in March

Activities (3rd March 1919 to 26th June 1919)

  • Return to the UK
  • Disbandment

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types:

FK8webprofile

ARMSTRONG WHITWORTH FK8

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron (including details on all known losses and incidents)

1918

The squadron operated as a Corps Squadron until the cessation of hostilities on 11th November 1918

Stationed at:

  • Estrees-en-Chaussée
  • 22/03/1918: Moved to Chipilly
  • 24/03/1918: Moved to Poulainville
  • 28/03/1918: Moved to Abbeville
  • 05/04/1918: Moved to Poulainville
  • 04/05/1918: Moved to Villers-Bocage (Flesselles)
  • 05/09/1918: Moved to Suzanne
  • 15/09/1918: Moved to Moislains
  • 06/10/1918: Moved to Longavesnes
  • 17/10/1918: Moved to Elincourt
  • 10/11/1918: Moved to Flaumont
  • 11/11/1918: Moved to Grand Fayt
  • 13/11/1918: Moved to Elincourt
  • 29/11/1918: Moved to La Bellevue

Estrees-en-Chaussée


Role

As a Corps Squadron, No. 35 Squadron was tasked with providing medium and short distance aerial reconnaissance for one of the British Army Corps Commands. The role included:

  • Location of Hostile Batteries
  • Observation of Artillery Fire
  • Contact Patrol Work
  • Close Reconnaissance and Photography
  • Offensive action against vulnerable points in the Army reconnaissance area

Command

  • 12th Corps Wing, 3rd Brigade, RFC (Attached to the Cavalry Corps [III Army])
  • 09/03/1918: 15th Corps Wing, 5th Brigade, RFC (Attached to the 19th Corps [IV Army])
  • 05/04/1918: 15th Corps Wing, 5th Brigade, RFC (Attached to the 3rd Corps [IV Army])
  • 06/10/1918: 15th Corps Wing, 5th Brigade, RFC (Attached to the 13th Corps [IV Army])
  • 10/11/1918: 5th Brigade, RFC Advanced Force [Bethell’s Force])

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer(s)
    • Major AV Holt DSO
    • 19/04/1918: Major KF Balmain
    • 09/09/1918: Major DF Stevenson DS0 MC

Strength

Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Conversion Training
  • Operational Training
  • Operational duties as a “Corps Squadron”

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)
Harper Log Book Dec 18 #1.jpg

Extract from HG Harper’s Log Book [Source: Harper Family]

Summary of the squadron’s photographic work (3rd August 1918)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types:

Armstrong Whitworth FK8 (for day to day training and operational use)

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is fk8webprofile.jpg

ARMSTRONG WHITWORTH FK8

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


BRISTOL FIGHTER
(for long range reconnaissance)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following links provide more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron (including details on all known losses and incidents)

1950 (Squadron Disbanded)

On 23rd February 1950, No. 35 Squadron personnel were transferred to RAF Marham to form the nucleus of the B-29 [Washington] Training Unit (as part of the reorganisation of No. 3 Group). At this point in time the squadron took on “number plate” status

Stationed at:

  • RAF Mildenhall (Suffolk)
  • January 1950: Detached to Shallufa (Egypt)
  • 23/02/1950: Moved to RAF Marham [to form Washington Training Unit]

Role

  • Main Force Bomber Squadron

Command

  • No 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Squadron Leader BHD Foster DSO DFC

Strength

Officers at Mildenhall1 [The Tatler 22-03-1950].JPG

35 Squadron Officers and Aircrew at Mildenhall [The Tatler]


Activities (up to 23/02/1950)

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Cross Country, Practice Bombing (High Level, Live and Blind on H2S), Fighter Affiliation, Air to Ground / Air to Air Firing)
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Astro cross country and live bombing detail (January)
    • Exercise Lookout, to test defences in the Canal Zone (January)
    • Exercise Pinpoint (Astro Navigation and bombing at Habbaniya Bombing Range) (January)
    • Bullseye, Night Fighter Affiliation and Bombing Exercise (bombing Heligoland) in conjunction with 11 Group, 12 Group and RNAS (February)
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

lincoln-profile

AVRO LINCOLN

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


BOEING B-29 [WASHINGTON]

On 23rd February 1950, the Mildenhall Squadrons were re-equipped with the Boeing B-29 [Washington]. The squadron’s Lincoln aircraft were transferred to No 148 Squadron at RAF Upwood

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following links provide more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron:

1949

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron throughout 1949

Stationed at:

  • RAF Stradishall (Suffolk)
  • 10/02/1949: Moved to RAF Mildenhall (Suffolk)

Role

  • Heavy Bomber Squadron

Command

  • No. 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader BHD Foster DSO DFC

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Cross County (using Bomber Command Standard of Navigation), Practice Bombing, GCA, BABS / Rebecca Training, Three-Engine Flying, Circuits and Landings, Air / Sea Firing, Instrument Rating Practice, Ding-Don, Fighter Affiliation, Formation Flying
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Fighter Affiliation exercise at Thorney Island (February)
    • Attacks on the Firth of Forth and Clyde areas to exercise the Auxiliary Squadrons, ground defences and early warning systems (March)
    • Day fighter affiliation exercises with fighters from Duxford (March)
    • Exercise with the American fleets off Lands End (April)
    • Station Bullseye on Heligoland with live bombs being dropped on Heligoland and simulated bombing (April)
    • Exercise Foil which was aimed at testing the fighter defences of Great Britain. Mock attacks were made on London, Leeds, Sheffield and many other industrial areas in the country (June)
    • Phase II, Day III of Exercise Foil (July)
    • Exercise Verity, the main feature of which was an attack on the combined units of the American and Royal Navy (July)
    • Command Exercise the purpose of which was to test the Norwegian defences (September)
    • Exercise in affiliation with Anti-Aircraft Command, during which calibration of ground defences was checked (September)
    • Exercise ‘Bulldog’, a Bomber Command exercise in which attacks were made on various towns in England (September)
    • Command Bullseye attack on Heligoland (September)
    • Exercise with the Royal Observer Corps (October)
    • Group Night Fighter Affiliation exercises (October)
    • Exercise Porcupine (a RAF combined attack on units of the Home Fleet) (November)
    • Night Fighter Affiliation exercises (November)
    • Command Bullseye attack of Heligoland (November)
    • RAF Manston for Photographic Instruction (November)
    • Group Night Fighter Affiliation Exercises (December)
    • Day Fighter Affiliation Exercises (December)
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO LANCASTER B1 (FE)
Profile (© Malcolm Barrass)


AVRO LINCOLN

On 12th August 1949, the squadron started to re-equip with Avro Lincoln and the squadron aircrew started their Conversion Training

Avro Lincoln Profile (© Malcolm Barrass)

The following links provide more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron:


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

1949 Reunion

Photo from the June 1949 edition of the Marker showing 35 Squadron reunion

1948

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron throughout 1948

Stationed at:

  • RAF Stradishall (Suffolk)
  • January 1948: Detached to Shallufa
  • June / July 1948: Detached to Shallufa

Role

  • Heavy Bomber Squadron

Command

  • No. 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RJ Boulding
    • 18/10/1948: Handed over to Squadron Leader BHD Foster DSO DFC

Strength

50

No 35 (and No 115 Squadron) Shallufa January 1948


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Cross County (using Bomber Command Standard of Navigation), H2S Practice, Practice Bombing, BABS / Rebecca Training, Three-engine flying, Circuits and Landings, Air / Sea Firing, Instrument Flying, Fighter Affiliation, Formation Flying
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Bullseye to Heligoland (February)
    • Fighter Affiliation (April)
    • Simulation Bombing (on new flashlight target at Bristol) (April)
    • Group Bullseye Exercise (April)
    • Night Fighter Affiliation (May)
    • RCC Exercise (May)
    • Exercise Dawn (May)
    • Exercise Sunray (June / July)
    • Group Fighter Affiliation Exercise (July)
    • Operation Dagger (September)
    • Operation Chester (September)
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue
  • Displays and Flypasts
    • Battle of Britain Flypast (September)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Squadron related Administrative Duties

Extract from RC Weeden’s Flying Log Book [Courtesy of Scott Weeden]


Events

Madras Presidency Presentation

At a ceremony at RAF Stradishall in March 1948, a writing table set that had been gifted by the Madras Presidency War Committee was presented to the squadron.


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Lancaster B.I(FE)

lancaster-b1-fe-profile

Avro Lancaster B1 (FE) Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron:


1947

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron throughout 1947

Stationed at:

  • RAF Stradishall (Suffolk)
  • Detachmed to Luqa / Italy (28/04/1947 to 10/05/1947)

RAF Stradishall


Role

  • Heavy Bomber Squadron
  • Stand-by Air Sea Rescue Squadron

Command

  • Main Force, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Wing Commander JND Chapple
    • 01/05/1947: Handed over to Squadron Leader RJ Boulding

Strength (Headquarters and A Flight (A and B Flights from 23/07/1947))


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • Cross County (using Bomber Command Standard of Navigation), H2S Practice, Practice Bombing, VHF Homing, BABS / Rebecca Training, Searchlight Co-Operation, Flashlight Bombing, Three engine flying, circuits and landings, Air / Sea Firing, Photography, Instrument Flying, Fighter Affiliation
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Goodwood Bullseye (Regular)
    • Frontline (Regular)
    • Attack on HMS Implacable (March)
    • Sunbronze (April / May)
    • Boomer (June)
    • Home Fleet (June)
    • Group Night Fighter Affiliation Exercise(s) (September and December)
    • Group Bombing Exercise(s) (October and November)
  • Ceremonial Duties (including flypasts and displays)
  • Stand-by Air Sea Rescue

In the latter part of 1947, Bomber Command introduced a Categorisation Scheme with all aircrew trades (excluding Air Gunners) being categorised as A, B or C. Pilots were also assessed on their Instrument Flying and awarded “tickets”

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Other squadron related Technical and Administrative Duties

Extract from RC Weeden’s Log Book (January 1947) [Courtesy of Scott Weeden]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

lancaster-b1-fe-profile

AVRO LANCASTER B1 (FE)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:


Lancaster PB762 (17/08/1945)

Lancaster PB762 was being utilised for Operation Dodge on 17th August 1945

Its crew comprised:

  • Peter George Ray Weeks (Pilot)
  • Others?

The AM Form 1180 shows: Pilot successfully landed aircraft on emergency landing ground at Istres (France) after engine failure in flight due to a coolant leak .


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 1180

Engine ran rough and was feathered due to loss of coolant caused by loose header tank camp (presumed not firmly replaced on last inspection at Bari)

AM Form 78


Lancaster SW263 (20/08/1945)

Lancaster SW263 was being utilised on a flight to repatriate Prisoners of War on 20th August 1945.

The crew comprised:

  • V Bowen-Morris (Pilot)
  • Others?

The AM Form 1180 shows that at 400 feet after take off, starboard inner engine started emitting white, then black smoke and flames; engine feathered and flames ceased; aircraft landed on airfield (Tibbenham); no further damage


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

There are no details recorded on the AM Form 78


Lancaster ME484 (15/09/1945)

The AM Form 1180 shows that whilst at Bari Airport (Italy), “aircraft (whilst parked at dispersal) was hit by MN802”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 shows that the aircraft was classified as Cat AC on 15th September 1945 and (possibly) struck off charge of the squadron at that time


1946

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron throughout 1946, representing the RAF at various events, including the Goodwill Tour of America

Stationed at:

  • RAF Graveley (Huntingdonshire)
  • 08/07/1946: Commenced Operation Lancaster (Goodwill Tour of USA)
  • 29/08/1946: Returned to RAF Graveley
  • 18/09/1946: Moved to RAF Stradishall (Suffolk)

Role

  • Heavy Bomber Squadron

Command

  • No 3 Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Wing Commander AJL Craig DSO DFC
    • 24/10/1946: Handed over to Wing Commander JND Chapple

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

In January, the squadron was advised that it would be posted to Egypt during February, but this was cancelled for political reasons just before the squadron was due to leave.

In October 1946, the squadron was designated as one of the Air Sea Rescue (ASR) squadrons. The role required the squadron to have one aircraft on immediate readiness and one on stand-by for one week each month.


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Operational Duties and Exercises
  • Standby Air Sea Rescue (from October 1946)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Other squadron related Technical and Administrative Duties

Extract from RC Weeden’s Log Book March 1946 [Courtesy of Scott Weeden]


Events

BoB Flypast Web Photo

Twelve No. 35 Squadron aircraft in the Battle of Britain flypast on 14th September 1946


35 Squadron aircraft over London, returning to RAF Graveley after the Goodwill Tour (August 1946)



Delft Pottery Plaque

On 30th April 1946, No. 35 Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “A delft pottery plaque, which has been prepared in commemoration of the liberation of Holland, has been presented by the Dutch to the Squadron. It depicts in colour, a Dutch field being showered with foodstuffs from Lancaster aircraft, the latter being welcomed by two waving members of the population. The inscription at the bottom reads “Food, Peace, Freedom 29th April to 5th May 1945”


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO LANCASTER B.I and B.III

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


AVRO LANCASTER B.I (FE)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following links provide more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:


Halifax HR736 (13/05/1943)

Halifax HR736 was one of twenty No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Pilsen / Bochum on the night of 13th / 14th May 1943

Its crew comprised:

  • Not known

No. 35 Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that “Aircraft HR736 was withdrawn after its was burnt out when its incendiaries were accidentally jettisoned”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as Cat E (Burnt) on 13th May 1943. It was struck off charge on 21st May 1943

AM Form 1180

The Am Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows “Aircraft stationary, electricians testing circuits; incendiaries released and aircraft caught fire. There were 2 possibilities (1) jettison bars were at “jettisoned” when Ground / Flight switch was turned to Flight (2) jettison bars at “safe” before bomb load xxx off, but pushed into “jettisoned” position by blow or pressure on Switch Box indicating electrical fault in aircraft. Impossible to be checked as all evidence destroyed”


Lancaster PB762 (17/10/1945)

Lancaster PB762 was being utilised for Operation Dodge on 17th October 1945

Its crew comprised:

  • JF Carsons (Pilot)
  • Others?

The AM Form 1180 shows that whilst at Tibbenham “running up, aircraft started to swing to port; starboard inner closed and brake applied; aircraft swung starboard and port wing tip hit the rudder of a parked aircraft. (Pilot failed to ensure that chocks were in place before starting up)


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 shows that the aircraft was classified as Cat FA/AC on 17th October 1945; it was returned to the squadron on 7th March 1946


 

Lancaster ND646 (30/03/1944)

Lancaster ND646 was one of fourteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Nuremberg on 30th / 31st March 1944.

Its seven man crew comprised:

  • Eric Charles Gregory (Pilot)
  • Cyril Thomas John Trott (Navigator)
  • Douglas William Kermode (Air Bomber)
  • Robert Henry Sadler (Wireless Operator)
  • Squire Nuttall (Air Gunner)
  • Wallace John Stewart (Air Gunner)
  • Jack Weaver (Flight Engineer)

The AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows “aircraft hit by incendiary bomb whilst on its way to target”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as Cat FB/A on 31st March 1944; it was repaired and returned to the squadron on 29th April 1944

1945

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron throughout 1945

Stationed at:

  • RAF Graveley (Huntingdonshire)

Role

  • To prepare and despatch aircraft and crews(*) capable of accurately marking the aiming point at a specified time, to enable main force crews to identify the release point during their bombing runs
  • Post War Clean Up (from 08/05/1945)

(*) The number of aircraft required for each operation was contained in the “scale of effort” which was issued by HQ Bomber Command on a daily basis


Command

  • No. 8 [Pathfinder Force] Group, Bomber Command
  • 15/12/1945: Transferred to No. 3 Group, Bomber Command (when No.8 [Pathfinder Force] Group was disbanded)

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Group Captain DFEC Dean DSO DFC
    • 01/03/1945: Handed over to Group Captain HJE Le Good DSO DFC
    • 11/09/1945: Handed over to Wing Commander AJL Craig DSO DFC

Strength

Note: On 24/05/1945, all Commonwealth airmen were posted out of the squadron in readiness for their repatriation.


Events affecting the squadron

VE Day was announced on the 8th May 1945 and the process of demobilisation of personnel and post war clean up started shortly afterwards

Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training (incl. air Exercises, such as Bombing, Fighter Affiliation and Cross Country)
  • Operational Sorties
  • Displays / Flypasts
  • At Home Exhibitions (Odiham and Filton)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations (#)
  • Other squadron related Technical and Administrative Duties

[#] It is worth noting that personnel on strength of No. 9035 Servicing Echelon were attached to No 35 Squadron to assist with the daily servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment from 3rd November 1943 until 3rd March 1945

Log Book Extract [Courtesy of Bernard Humphreys]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO LANCASTER B.I and B.III

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


AVRO LANCASTER B.I(FE)

The squadron took delivery of its first Avro Lancaster B.I(FE) in November 1945

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more detail regarding the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron


1966

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron, with QRA capability, throughout 1966.
It also provided detachment(s) to Tengah, in support of Operation Matterhorn (January to August 1966)

Stationed at:

  • RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)
  • Rotational Tengah Detachments (Operation Matterhorn) (January to August 1966)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing

Command:

  • Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command
  • Far East Air Force (Tengah Detachments)

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander DA Arnott DFC

Strength


World Events impacting the squadron

Indonesian Confrontation (Operation Matterhorn)

In 1966, the squadron sent detachments to Tengah, Singapore to provide support during the Indonesian Confrontation (which took place between 1963 and 1966).

The record book shows “Operation Matterhorn requires a number of Vulcan aircraft and crews to be detached to the Far East. No 35 Squadron carries one-third of this commitment and crews are detached to the theatre for periods of approximately three and a half months”

On Sunday 14th August, orders were received covering the withdrawal of the medium bombers to the United Kingdom. This followed the signing of the Bangkok Agreement by Malaysia and Indonesia, ending the confrontation between these two countries.


Activities

Air Crew

  • War Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kinsman (Regular)
    • Billion (Regular)
    • Mick (January and December 1966)
    • Co-Op (April and October 1966)
    • Micky Finn (May 1966)
    • Statex (November 1966)
  • Operation Matterhorn (Tengah Detachments) including exercises:
    • Long Horn (February 1966)
    • Anvil (February 1966)
    • Short Spica (March 1966)
    • Gannex (April and May 1966)
    • Anvil 2 (May 1966)
    • Angle Iron (June 1966)
    • Long Hop (June 1966)
    • High Castor (August 1966)
  • Rangers
    • Western
    • Pacific
    • Akrotiri
    • Goose
    • Luqa
    • El Adem
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • “Round the World Trip” for the Auckland Air Display (January / February 1966)
    • Firepower Demonstration at China Rock Bombing Range (July 1966)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • “Big Flight” – 1966 Strategic Air Command Bombing Competition (September / October 1966)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Events

Aircraft from No 12 and No 35 Squadron on display at the opening of Auckland Airport (January 1966). It is worth noting that whilst on this “Round the World Trip”, the aircraft covered the 2,100 nautical mile leg between Hawaii and California in a record time of 3hrs and 40 minutes


35 Squadron aircraft, which had returned from Darwin to Tengah on 17th August, prepare to return to the UK on 23rd. .

Flt. Lt JM Morgan and crew, Flt. Lt B Dorrington and crew and Flt. Lt PG Franklin and crew formed up after take off and did a flypast over Tengah for the benefit of the news cameramen covering the withdrawal.


Tengah2 [Marham Aviation Heritage Centre FB]

A low pass by Flt Lt J M Morgan at Tengah to mark the squadron’s departure from the Far East on 23rd August 1966.

[Source: Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from Cottesmore Pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available from the station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:

1967

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron, with QRA capability, throughout 1967

Stationed at:

  • RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)
  • Sunspot Detachment (June 1967)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing

Command

  • Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command

Note: The Cottesmore Wing was reduced to two squadrons (No. 9 and No. 35 Squadron) on 31st December 1967 when No. 12 Squadron was disbanded.


Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander DA Arnott DFC
    • 19/07/1967: Handed over to Wing Commander HS Carver MVO

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • War Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kinsman (Regular)
    • Billion (Regular)
    • Springtime (NATO Air Defence) (April 1967)
    • Sunspot Detachment (June 1967)
    • Kingpin (July 1967)
    • Micky Finn (July 1967)
    • Unison (October 1967)
    • Co-Op (Danish Air Defence) (October 1967)
    • Mick (November 1967)
    • Emlyn (November 1967)
  • Rangers
    • Wildenrath
    • Laarbruch
    • Western
    • Goose
    • Offutt
    • Pacific
    • Luqa
    • El Adem
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • RAF Oakington (January 1967)
    • Upper Heyford / Mildenhall (US Armed Forces Day) (May 1967)
    • Demonstration Scrambles (March, July and October 1967)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Station inter-squadron Bombing, Navigation and Communications Competition (February 1967)
    • Bomber Command Bombing, Navigation and Communications Competition (March 1967)
    • Giant Voice

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Events

Station Bombing Competition February 1967 [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre].jpg

Station Bombing Trophy
Wg. Cdr. Arnott collects the Trophy (February 1967)


 Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available from the station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents


Avro Vulcan XM655 (25/04/1967)

Avro Vulcan XM655 was being utilised for a 549 Trial on 25th April 1967.

Its crew comprised:

  • B Dorrington (Capt)
  • MC Ward (Co-Pilot)
  • DN Spicer (Nav Plot)
  • LA Wisbey (Nav Rad)
  • JM Shackleton (AEO)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows: Aircraft suffered total hydraulics failure shortly after take off. After burning off fuel, aircraft landed but brake parachute did not deploy correctly and caused the aircraft to veer off the runway onto the grass. No Casualties

 

1968

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1968, with QRA capability (up until 30th June)

Stationed at:

  • RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)
  • Detached to RAF Luqa (Sunspot) February / March 1968)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing

Command

  • Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Bomber Command
  • 04/1968: Cottesmore Wing, V Force, No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Personnel

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander HS Carver MVO

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • War Target Study
  • Provision of QRA Capability (1 aircraft at all times) (ceased on 30th June 1968)
  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Kinsman (Regular)
    • Billion (Regular)
    • Kingpin (Regular)
    • Groupex (January 1968)
    • Mick (January 1968)
    • Black Eagle (February 1968)
    • Sunspot (February / March 1968)
    • Sky Blue (June 1968)
    • Ravneklo (September 1968)
    • Co-Op (October 1968)
    • Micky Finn (November 1968)
  • Rangers
    • Western
    • Goose
    • Pacific
    • Akrotiri
    • El Adem
    • Luqa
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Queen’s Review (Abingdon)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Station Navigation, Communication and Bombing Competition (April 1968)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Extract from a Flying Log Book [Courtesy of the “Cyprus Years 69-71 Group”


Events

Battle of Britain Parade (York Minster)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door

The following link provides more details about the aircraft that were available from the station pool, along with information on known losses and incidents

1969

On 1st January 1969, the squadron was posted to RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus as part of the UK’s commitment to CENTO.
It operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1969

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander HS Carver MVO
    • 02/09/1969: Handed over to Wing Commander RK Hepburn

Strength

Note: When the Squadron moved to Akrotiri from Cottesmore, crews were given staggered tourex dates at Akrotiri varying from eighteen months to three and a half years to keep a level of experience on the squadron while replacement crews came in. This staggered approach continued until all crews could do the standard 3 year tour.

No 35 Squadron October 1969 [Courtesy of Cyprus Years 69-71 Group]


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Calabria (Regular)
    • Early Affair (March 1969)
    • Springclip (April 1969)
    • Pedigree (April 1969)
    • Dawn Patrol (April 1969)
    • Malta ADEX (May 1969)
    • May Generation (May 1969)
    • Shahin 7 (September 1969)
    • Deep Furrow (October 1969)
    • Ranular (October 1969)
  • Rangers:
    • Tengah
    • UK
    • Island
    • Malta
    • Tehran
    • Ankara
    • Nairobi
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Firepower Demonstration (October 1969)
    • Scramble Demonstration (October 1969)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Note: A Vulcan Flight Simulator, Air Electronics Trainer and a Bombing Navigation Systems Trainer were installed at RAF Akrotiri during 1969


Events

Dispersal at RAF Akrotiri

The first five crews (Bayliss, Dorrington, Carver, Tench and Wood) departed for RAF Akrotiri (from RAF Cottesmore) on 15th January 1969.


[Courtesy of "Cyprus Years 69-71 Group"]

Newspaper article on squadron open day


The Cheshire Children’s Home in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia was adopted by the squadron in April 1969. Fund raising activities were organised and an annual donation was made to the home


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

Entrance Door

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following link provides more detail on the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with information on known losses and incidents:


1970

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1970

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal
  • Detachment to Masirah (March 1970)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander RK Hepburn

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Generation Exercise (February 1970)
    • ADEX (February and May 1970)
    • Pedigree (March 1970)
    • Epic Battle (April 1970)
    • Dawn Patrol (June 1970)
    • Shabaz 16 (July 1970)
    • Pedigree Five (October 1970)
    • Deep Express (October 1970)
    • Lime Jug (November 1970)
    • Hettie 2 (December 1970)
  • Rangers
    • Tengah
    • UK
    • Malta
    • Tehran
    • Ankara
    • Nairobi
  • Trainers
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Firepower Demonstration (September 1970)
  • Bombing Competitions
    • Strike Command Bombing and Navigation Competition (representing NEAF) (April / May 1970)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Events

Visit of HRH Duchess of Gloucester October 1970.jpg

Visit of HRH Duchess of Gloucester October 1970


Vulcan XL445, flying as part of a 3 Ship to Masirah in December 1970

[Photograph courtesy of Dick Yates]


Presentation of the Detachment Board to Wg Cdr Christie, before the departure of the No. 35 Squadron and No. 9 Squadron to represent NEAF at the Strike Command Bombing and Navigation Competition (April / May 1970)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1971

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1971

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander RK Hepburn
    • 16/08/1971: Handed over to Wing Commander JB Fitzpatrick

RK Hepburn hands over command to JB Fitzpatrick

[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Taceval
    • Dawn Patrol
    • Deep Furrow
    • Exit Door
    • Hettie
    • Pedigree
    • Shahbaz
    • Sundial
  • Rangers
    • UK
    • Island
    • Nairobi
    • Malta
    • Ankara
    • Tehran
    • Tengah

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

[Courtesy of Cyprus Years 69 – 71 Group]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents:


1972

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1972

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal
  • Detachment to Masirah

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander JB Fitzpatrick
    • 12/1972: Handed over to Wing Commander KI Watson
Flamingo7crop [Peter Pressland]

KI Watson (left) and JB Fitzpatrick (right)

[Source: Flamingo Magazine]


Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Taceval
    • Dawn Patrol
    • Deep Furrow
    • Easy Life
    • Hettie
    • Pedigree / Midlink
    • Shahbaz
    • Umber
  • Rangers
    • Malta
    • Island
  • Trainers
    • UK
    • Gulf

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

1972 Log Book Extract [Courtesy of Roy Brocklebank)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1973

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1973

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal
  • Detachment to Masirah (05/03/1973 to 12/03/1973)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander KI Watson

Strength

No. 35 Squadron December 1973 [Courtesy of Ken Watson]


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Umber (Teheran) (Regular)
    • Pedigree (March, September and November 1973)
    • Special Flight to New Zealand (March 1973)
    • Dawn Patrol (June 1973)
    • Air Defence Exercise (Malta) (August 1973)
    • Deep Furrow (September 1973)
    • Selwyn (October 1973)
    • Taceval (October 1973)
    • Midlink (November 1973)
    • Air Defence Exercise (Cyprus) (December 1973)
    • Trainers (UK / Gulf)
  • Rangers
    • Malta
    • Masirah
    • Ankara
    • Gan
    • Nairobi
    • Tengah
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Venice (September 1973)
    • Nicosia (September 1973)
    • Firepower Demonstration (Episkopi Bay) (September 1973)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • Strike Command Bombing and Navigation Competition (May 1973)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties
Log Cropped.jpg

Extract from Log Book (Courtesy of W. MacGillivray)


Events

Mount Etna from 9000ft taken from Air Bomber position 31st January 1973


[Courtesy of Roy Brocklebank]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1974

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1974

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri (Cyprus), using Delta [or Echo] Dispersal
  • Detached to Shiraz [Iran] (31/05/1974 to 05/06/1974)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])

Command

  • NEAF (Near East Air Force).

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander KI Watson

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

It is worth noting that the Cyprus Emergency during the year resulted in flight restrictions, standby alert states and redeployments to Malta and the UK


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness / dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercise
    • Pedigree (Masirah) (Regular)
    • Umber (Iran) (Regular)
    • Shahbaz 1974 (May / June 1974)
    • Baker (June 1974)
    • Malta Adex (July 1974)
    • Sundial (October 1974)
  • Rangers
    • Malta
    • Ankara
    • Island
    • Italian / Gulf / UK Trainers
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • CENTO Bombing Demonstration (July 1974)
  • Marine Radar Reconnaissance (during Cyprus Emergency)

Ground Personnel

  • Administrative Duties

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from a station pool):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

It is worth noting that whilst in Akrotiri, aircraft were on charge of the station, with Centralised Servicing in place. As such, the squadron badge did not appear on the tailplane, although it was displayed on the entrance door, along with the Station Badge and the badges of the other squadron(s) stationed at Akrotiri

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to the squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents:


1975

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron at RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus until 16th January 1975, when it was posted back to the UK as a result of the Cyprus Emergency. It operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron in the UK from 1st March 1975

Stationed at:

  • RAF Akrotiri
  • 16/01/1975: Moved to RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal
  • Detachment to Cyprus (April / May 1975)

Role

  • Up to 16/01/1975
    • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing (providing bomber support in the near east, in accordance with the UK’s 1956 commitment to the Central Treaty Organisation [CENTO])
  • From 16/01/1975:
    • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
    • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Personnel

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander KI Watson
    • 06/1975: Handed over to Wing Commander AT Atkinson

Wing Commander KI Watson hands over command of the squadron to Wing Commander AT Atkinson

[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

Scampton Redeployment (Extract from the squadron’s Record Book)

“The squadron was informed in December that it was to redeploy to RAF Scampton by 1st February 1975.

To this end, an advance party comprising Sqn Ldr A Ward, Flt Lt JB Ince and Flt Lt. JE Steenson travelled to Scampton on 11th January 1975. The first wave of four aircraft led by Wg Cdr KI Watson and with Sqn Ldr WD MacGillivray, Flt Lt GR Agnew and Flt Lt IGF Lord as captains of the other three aircraft flew to Scampton on 16th January 1975. The aircraft were greeted by the Station Commander Gp Capt JB Fitzpatrick and a reception party representing the station and its resident squadrons. Sqn Ldr ACR Ingoldby, Sqn Ldr Rogers, Flt Lt D Walby, Flt Lt CR Allkins and crews flew the second wave of four aircraft without incident on 23rd January 1975. Fg Off KM O’Sullivan escorted the Squadron Standard and restricted Squadron material to Scampton by 46 Group aircraft on 24th January 1975. The remaining members of the squadron travelled to Scampton by normal service means”

The move from Akrotiri to Scampton has entailed a complete change in the Squadron administrative organisation. Whereas in Cyprus, all ground crew administration was handled by a separate unit, at Scampton, the Squadron has become semi-autonomous with its own ground crew and partial administration for them, as well as responsibility for its own aircraft


Activities

The squadron prepared for its return to the UK (which commenced on the 16th January 1975) and, on arrival, personnel were given 21 days disembarkation leave. It then had to re-qualify all its crews for UK operations (high and low and day and night) before becoming operational on 1st March 1975

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime and Fighter Affiliation Exercise
    • Mick / Sumbal (Regular)
    • Scorer (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Brown Falcon (Regular)
    • Shahbaz / Forearm (Cyprus) (April / May 1975)
    • Crackforce (June 1975)
    • Coldfire (September 1975)
    • Highwood (September 1975)
    • Datex (October 1975)
    • Ocean Safari (November 1975)
  • Rangers / Trainers
    • Goose Bay
    • Malta
    • Italian
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Prestwick (June 1975)
    • Binbrook (July 1975)
    • St Mawgan (August 1975)
    • Yeovilton (September 1975)
    • Ottawa (September 1975)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Ground Personnel (from 16/01/1975)

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

IMG_4213 John Fitzpatrick (CO Scampton) greeting K Watson 16-01-75).JPG

John Fitzpatrick (CO Scampton) greets KI Watson on arrival at Scampton 16th January 1975

[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]



The first aircraft to carry the conjoined 35 (Skyhook) was XL446, when it was flown from Akrotiri to Scampton by KI Watson on 16th January 1975


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from station pool [up to 16/01/1975] and then from its own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1976

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron throughout 1976

XJ824 [1976].jpg

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal
  • Detached to Luqa (December 1976)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander AT Atkinson

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Index (Regular)
    • Mick / Sumbul (Regular)
    • Taceval (Regular)
    • Scorer (Regular)
    • Blue Moon (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Datex (May 1976)
    • Crackforce (June 1976)
    • Joint Maritime Course (July 1976)
    • Active Edge (August 1976)
    • Teamwork (September 1976)
    • Solar Flare (Luqa) (December 1976)
  • Rangers
    • Goose Bay / Offutt
    • Luqa / Akrotiri
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Fairchild Air Display (May 1976)
    • Leicester Air Day (August 1976)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • Double Top (March and April 1976)
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

XH561 at Fairchild Air Display May 1976 [Source: Sal Aguirre]


Wg Cdr Tony Atkinson (CO 35 Squadron) cuts a birthday cake during a buffet dance at Scampton’s Flying Bowman Club, to celebrate the 60 year anniversary of the founding of the squadron


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

Goulding AE (23/12/1940)

The Air Ministry P4 Casualty Files (which provide details relating to casualties of air operations and aircraft accidents 1939-1945) contains a file (AIR 81/4807) relating to the following No. 35 Squadron airman:

  • A E Goulding (killed as a result of enemy action at Manchester on 23rd December 1940)

There are no details in the squadron’s Operations Record Book,

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial information:

  • GOULDING, ALBERT EDWARD, Aircraftman 2nd Class ‘978247’ WIGAN CEMETERY Sec. A. Nonconformist. Grave 681.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Burial Records

Burial records show place of death as Greengate Arches, SALFORD, with burial date as 11th January 1941

1977

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron throughout 1977

XL446 at St Mawgan [Copyright John M Boulder With kind permission of Andrew Molland]

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal
  • Detached to RAF St Mawgan (11/071977 to 15/07/1977)

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander AT Atkinson
    • 10/06/1977: Handed over to Wing Commander R Sweatman

Wing Commander AT Atkinson handing over to Wing Commander R Sweatman
[Courtesy of Tony Atkinson]


Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Taceval (Regular)
    • Index (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Cavalcade (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Blue Moon (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Datex (Regular)
    • Joint Maritime Course (Regular)
    • Watcon (May 1977)
    • Mandioc (May 1977)
    • Highfield (May 1977)
    • Highwood (July 1977)
    • Ocean Safari (October 1977)
  • Rangers
    • Goose
    • Pacific
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Coningsby Open Day (June 1977)
    • St Truiden, Belgium (June 1977)
    • St Mawgan (July 1977)
    • Royal Review Finningley (July 1977)
    • Chicago (August 1977)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • Double Top (February, March and May 1977)
    • Red Flag (Nellis Air Force Base, USA) (August 1977)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

Royal Review Finningley [Source: airportdata]


During the week 11 – 15 July, 35 Squadron was detached to RAF St Mawgan in support of the Royal College of Defence Studies Visit (13 Jul). and RAF St Mawgan International Air Day (14 Jul). Six crews and six aircraft took part. On both days the squadron launched a four aircraft scramble, one display, flown by Sqn Ldr Jarron and crew and one aircraft was statically displayed.


Presentation of Bristol Siddeley Bombing Trophy, won by Flt Lt Bennett and his Crew


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1978

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron throughout 1978

Squadron aircraft at Luqa (1978) [Aircraft Illustrated]

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Personnel

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander R Sweatman

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station readiness and dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime Exercise and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Index (Regular)
    • Mineval (Regular)
    • Taceval (Regular)
    • Cavalcade (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Brown Falcon (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Natinads (Regular)
    • Blue Moon (Regular)
    • Datex (Regular)
    • Joint Maritime Course (Regular)
    • Solar Flare (RAF Luqa) (August 1978)
    • Northern Wedding (September 1978)
    • Active Edge (November 1978)
  • Rangers:
    • Goose
    • Pacific
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Deelen (Holland) (June 1978)
    • Church Fenton (June 1978)
    • Edwards Air Force Base and Hong Kong (November 1978)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • Double Top (May, June and July 1978)
    • Giant Voice (August / September 1978)
    • Red Flag (November / December 1978)
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Extract from a Flying Log Book (November 1978)


Events

Photo taken on August 8th 1978 at Akrotiri, en route to RAF Luqa for MRR Flight

Lieutenants Purchase, Collier, Lindo, Morgan and Squadron Leader Singleton

[Courtesy of Aviation Heritage Research Centre and Bob Lindo]


1978 Red Flag Crew
Bowey (Chief Tech), Keating, Butterworth, Hewitt, Lidbetter, Breeze, Doe (Chief Tech)

[Courtesy of MAHC]


Sqn Ldr Ed Jarron and crew at their Command Crew presentation (March 1978)

[Courtesy of MAHC]


DEELEN AIR SHOW

XM570 Vulcan B.2 at Deelen airbase in the Netherlands on 17th June 1978, during the annual air show

[Photograph with kind permission of Peter Terlouw]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

XL446 at Scampton 1978 [With kind permission of Russ Smith 30.10.2017]

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1979

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron throughout 1979

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander R Sweatman
    • May 1979: Handed over to Wing Commander IO Junor

Strength

May 1979 [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre].jpg

May 1979 [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime Exercises and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Index (Regular)
    • Cavalcade (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Natinads (Regular)
    • Brown Falcon (Regular)
    • Joint Maritime Course (Regular)
    • Spring Train (March 1979)
    • Highwood (July 1979)
    • Coffee Charlie (July 1979)
    • Coldfire (September 1979)
    • Blue Moon (September 1979)
    • Ocean Safari (October 1979)
  • Rangers
    • Goose Bay
    • Pacific
    • Akrotiri
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Queen’s Birthday Flypast (June 1979)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • Double Top (February, May and June 1979)
    • Giant Voice (October / November 1979)
    • Red Flag (December 1979)
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Extract from a Flying Log Book (March 1979)


Events

Wing Commander Junor and his crew flew to Trondheim, Norway on 22nd June 1979 to represent No. 35 Squadron at the unveiling ceremony of a memorial, erected in the Trondheim Fjord, to RAF War heroes involved in the Tirpitz raid of 28th April 1942. The ceremony took place on Sunday 24th June and the crew returned to Scampton on 25th


WG CDR Sweatman presents a painting of a Halifax to the Squadron, watched by John Larder (the artist).

The painting was auctioned off in May 1979


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Vulcan Profile (Low)

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1944

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron (Path Finder Role) throughout 1944

Stationed at:

  • RAF Graveley (Huntingdonshire)
Control Tower (PHerod)

RAF Graveley Control Tower


Role

  • To prepare and despatch aircraft and crews(*) capable of accurately marking the aiming point at a specified time, to enable main force crews to identify the release point during their bombing runs

(*) The number of aircraft required for each operation was contained in the “scale of effort” which was issued by HQ Bomber Command on a daily basis


Command

  • No. 8 [Pathfinder Force] Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander SP Daniels DSO DFC
    • 25/07/1944: Handed over to Group Captain DFEC Dean DSO DFC
Dean

DFEC Dean


Strength

On 20th March, the squadron was reduced to two flights when Air Crew and Ground Crew from “B Flight” were posted to Downham Market” to form the nucleus of No. 635 Squadron – read more –


Activities:

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training (such as Bombing, Fighter Affiliation and Cross Country)
  • Operational Sorties

Ground Personnel (#)

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Other Squadron related Technical and Administrative Duties

[#] It is worth noting that personnel on strength of No. 9035 Servicing Echelon were attached to No 35 Squadron to assist with the daily servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment from 3rd November 1943 until 3rd March 1945

Target Photo Le Havre 10/09/1944


Events

Christmas Dinner Menu 1944
[Courtesy of Lisa Phillips]


A BIRTHDAY TO REMEMBER

Flying with No. 35 Squadron Path Finder Force from Graveley, our crew took part in an attack on Magdeburg on 21st January 1944
– read more –


D DAY COMMITMENTS

The following, which is extracted from the squadron’s Operations Record Book, summarises No 35 Squadron’s commitments to the D-Day landings
– read more –


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment:

HALIFAX HP59 B MKII (Series 1 / Series 1 Special)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


HALIFAX HP59 B MKII [Series 1a]
(version with modified tail fin)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


HALIFAX HP61 B MKIII

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


AVRO LANCASTER B.I and B.III

In March 1944, the squadron started to re-equip with the Avro Lancaster B.I and B.III

Avro Lancaster Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following links provide more detail on the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on losses and incidents::

1980

The squadron operated as a medium bomber and maritime radar reconnaissance squadron throughout 1980

XL443 on Foxtrot Dispersal [Courtesy of Mike O’Gorman]

 Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander IO Junor

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence, Joint Maritime and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Tacevel (Regular)
    • Index (Regular)
    • Priory (Regular)
    • Cavalcade (Regular)
    • Blue Moon (Regular)
    • Brown Falcon (Regular)
    • Natinads (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Joint Maritime Course (Regular)
    • No 6 Squadron Air Defence Exercise (March 1980)
    • Teamwork 80 (September 1980)
  • Rangers
    • Goose Bay / Offutt
    • Akrotiri
    • Wildenrath
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Queen’s Birthday Flypast (June 1980)
    • Offutt Air Show
  • Navigation and Bombing Competitions
    • Double Top (May and July 1980)
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

WG CDR Junor receives the Squadron Efficiency Trophy (April 1980)
[Courtesy of MAHC}


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Vulcan Profile (Low)

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

XH561 at Scampton 25th April 1980 [Courtesy of Barny Helen Summerfield]

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1981

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron throughout 1981 and as a maritime radar reconnaissance squadron until June 1981

XM570 [Courtesy of Richard Pidduck]

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance (until June 1981)

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Personnel

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander IO Junor
    • 15/06/1981: Handed over to Wing Commander NI Hamilton.

Strength


Events effecting the squadron

Throughout the year, the combined effect of the defence cuts and the gradual ageing of the Vulcan resulted in the loss of aircraft that were on charge of the squadron.


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Station Readiness / Dispersal, Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Mineval (Regular)
    • Index (Regular)
    • Datex (Regular)
    • Blue Moon (Regular)
    • Brown Falcon (Regular)
    • Cloudy Chorus (Regular)
    • Cavalcade / Priory (Regular)
    • Dialect (February 1981)
    • Haricot Vert (December 1981)
  • Rangers
    • Goose Bay / Offutt
    • Istrana
    • Treviso
    • Aviano
  • Displays / Flypasts
    • Queen’s Birthday Flypast (June 1981)
    • Vulcan Silver Jubilee (July 1981)
  • Navigation / Bombing Competitions
    • STC Bombing Competition (May 1981)
    • Double Top (July 1981)
    • No. 35 Squadron vs No. 617 Squadron (August 1981)
    • No. 35 Squadron vs No. 9 Squadron (November 1981)
  • Maritime Radar Reconnaissance (ceased June 1981)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

IMG_0095

IMPROMPTU FAREWELL TO VULCAN XM570
[Courtesy of Richard Pidduck]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

Vulcan Profile (Low)

AVRO VULCAN B2

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1943

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron (Path Finder role) throughout 1943

Stationed at:

  • RAF Graveley (Huntingdonshire)
RAF GRAVELEY copy

RAF Graveley


Role

  • To prepare and despatch aircraft and crews(*) capable of accurately marking the aiming point at a specified time, to enable main force crews to identify the release point during their bombing runs

(*) The number of aircraft required for each operation was contained in the “scale of effort” which was issued by HQ Bomber Command on a daily basis


Command

  • Pathfinder Force (No. 3 Group), Bomber Command
  • 01/1943: Renamed No. 8 [Pathfinder Force] Group, Bomber Command.

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander BV Robinson DFC
    • 01/05/1943: Handed over to Wing Commander DFEC Dean DSO DFC
    • 17/11/1943: Handed over to Wing Commander SP Daniels DSO DFC

Strength

July 1943 [Colin Hewlett [Credit - Friends of the Pathfinders]].jpg

July 1943 [Courtesy of Colin Hewlett / Friends of the Pathfinders]


Activities:

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training (incl. air Exercises, such as Bombing, Fighter Affiliation and Cross Country)
  • Operational Sorties

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Other Squadron related Technical and Administrative Duties

[#] It is worth noting that personnel on strength of No. 9035 Servicing Echelon were attached to No 35 Squadron to assist with the daily servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment from 3rd November 1943 until 3rd March 1945

LogBook2

Extract from EC Brown’s Log Book


Events

MEMORIES OF A DITCHING

This is a true story about the experiences of a Pathfinder crew of No. 35 Squadron (No. 8 Group Pathfinder Force Bomber Command) – read more –


BOMB EXPLOSION AT GRAVELEY

On 25th July 1943 a 1,000lb GP bomb exploded during the fusing operation in a Fuzing Shed at RAF Graveley
– read more –


2nd BOMB EXPLOSION AT GRAVELEY

A bomb exploded at RAF Graveley on 25th November 1943, killing three airmen (RC Boak, C Crane and M Shaw) and injuring two others (E Webster and  AC Muller)
– read more –

Note: Photograph of Fuzing Shed not taken at RAF Graveley


Aircraft

The squadron, was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment:

:

Halifax HP59 B MKII (Series 1 / Series 1 Special)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


HP59 Halifax B MKII [Series 1a]
(version with modified tail fin)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


HP61 Halifax B MKIII

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details on the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, including information on known losses and incidents:

Handley Page Halifax


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Memories of 1943 (Ronald Gayner)

Ronald Gayner [Courtesy of Dick Gayner]

“It was a long time ago, and funny how we remember the things that happened way back, yet we sometimes have a job to remember what happened yesterday – read more –

1942

The squadron operated as a heavy bomber squadron throughout 1942

Stationed at:

  • RAF Linton-On-Ouse (Yorkshire)
  • 12/08/1942: Moved to RAF Graveley (Huntingdonshire)

RAF Linton-On-Ouse


Role

  • To prepare and despatch aircraft and crews, in accordance with “scale of effort” instructions issued by Bomber Command.
  • From 12/08/1942: To prepare and despatch aircraft and crews(*) capable of accurately marking the aiming point at a specified time, to enable main force crews to identify the release point during their bombing runs.

(*) The number of aircraft required for each operation was contained in the “scale of effort” which was issued by HQ Bomber Command on a daily basis


Command

  • No 4 Group, Bomber Command
  • 12/08/1942: Transferred to Pathfinder Force (No. 3 Group), Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander BV Robinson DFC
    • 26/01/1942: Handed over to Wing Commander JNH Whitworth DSO DFC
    • 12/03/1942: Handed over to Wing Commander JH Marks DSO DFC
    • 09/1942: Wing Commander BV Robinson DSO DFC (following JH Marks death)

Robinson, Whitworth and Marks


Strength

Note: In February, No. 35 Halifax Conversion Flight was formed, with aircraft and personnel drawn from No. 35 Squadron.

35sqdnmarch1942

No. 35 Squadron (February 1942) [Courtesy of Linzee Duncan]


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training (incl. air Exercises, such as Bombing, Fighter Affiliation and Cross Country)
  • Operational Sorties

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Other Squadron related Technical and Administrative Duties

Events

ATTACKS ON THE TIRPITZ (MARCH / APRIL 1942)

Extracts from No. 35 Squadron’s Operations Record Book regarding the attacks on the Battleship “Tirpitz” (which was moored in Fættenfjord, Norway) in March and April 1942 – read more –


VISIT OF THE KING AND QUEEN
(28th March 1942)

The Record Book shows “Their Majesties the KING and QUEEN accompanied by the A.O.C. 4. Group AVM CR Carr and other members of the party arrived this morning about 10.15. After inspecting a Halifax MkII loaded with 4,000lb bombs, their Majesties conversed with the crew of this aircraft, S/Ldr. P.H Cribb, W.O.Wilson, F/Sgt. Martin, Sgt. Gardiner, Sgt. Wing, Sgt. Ryan and Sgt. O’Kane. The remaining aircrew Officers and N.C.O’s paraded in working dress in front of ‘C’ Hangar and their Majesties spoke to several including All Dominion personnel and those whom the KING had previously presented with decorations. They left the Flying Field and proceeded to the Officers Mess and then departed for another station at approx 11.30. All ground crew and other personnel lined the approach and cheered their Majesties off”


VISIT OF PRIME MINISTER

On 15th May, the Prime Minister, Winston Churchill visited Linton-On-Ouse where he inspected aircrews, along with one of the Halifax aircraft. He also visited Flying Control and witnessed an aircraft making a blind approach


THE MOVE TO RAF GRAVELEY

The Record Book shows “On 12th August 1942, an Advance Party proceeded by rail from RAF Linton-On-Ouse to RAF Graveley and the squadron was transferred from No. 4 Group, Bomber Command to the newly formed Pathfinder Force (No. 3 Group, Bomber Command) on that day. On 14th August, a Road Party (with service vehicles) travelled to Graveley followed by the Main Party, which proceeded by rail and air on 15th August. The Rear Party, which had been left with two unserviceable aircraft at Linton-on-Ouse, travelled by rail on 17th August, thereby completing the move to RAF Graveley”


THE FIRST OPERATION AS A PATHFINDER SQUADRON

The squadron flew its first operational sortie as a Pathfinder squadron on the 18th August 1942

An extract from a 35 Squadron navigation report from the first PFF operation


VISIT FROM REPRESENTATIVE OF INDIAN WAR COUNCIL

On 21st October 1942, Maharaja Jam Sahib of Nawanagar (Indian War Council) visited Graveley (as a representative of India which was funding aircraft under the Ministry of Aircraft Production [MAP] Empire Scheme).


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

HALIFAX HP57 B MKI [Series 1 and 2]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


HALIFAX HP57 B MKI [Series 3]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


HALIFAX HP59 B MKII [Series 1]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


HALIFAX HP59 B MKII [Series 1 Special]
(version with mid-upper turret removed)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details on the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, including information on known losses and incidents:


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

1941

No. 35 Squadron became operational with the Handley Page Halifax on 10th March 1941 and operated as a heavy bomber squadron after this date

Stationed at:

  • RAF Linton-on-Ouse (Yorkshire)

Role

  • “To bring the newly developed four-engine Handley Page Halifax heavy bomber into operational service”
  • From 10/03/1941: To prepare and despatch aircraft and crews, in accordance with “scale of effort” instructions issued by Bomber Command.

Command

  • No. 4 (Bomber) Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander RWP Collings AFC
    • 03/07/1941: Handed over to Wing Commander BV Robinson DFC

Strength

During April, forty airmen from No. 10 Squadron were attached to squadron crews for “conversion training”, so that they could gain experience of the Halifax before moving on to form the nucleus of the newly reformed No. 76 Squadron (which was based at Linton until its move to Middleton-St-George in June).

In May, with many of the squadron’s aircraft grounded due to technical problems, its second pilots were detached to No. 58 Squadron (which was also based at Linton-On-Ouse) to gain operational experience on the twin-engine Armstrong-Whitworth Whitley. In addition, a number of personnel were posted to the newly reformed No. 76 Squadron.

In May, thirty Fitters from the squadron successfully completed a course to enable them to operate as Fitter II [Flight Engineer] on the Halifax.

In August, a Halifax Conversion Flight (No. 28) was formed at Linton-On-Ouse with aircraft and personnel drawn from No. 35 and No. 76 Squadron. Note: This flight transferred to Leaconfield October / November 1941.


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training (including Cross Country, Night Flying, Lorenz Blind Approach and Air Firing [Filey Bay])
  • Air Tests (#) , including flights to test:
    • fuel consumption
    • operational heights
    • “all-up weight” handling
    • standard blind approach
    • wireless telegraphy
    • automatic pilot (George)
  • Operational Sorties (from 10/03/1941)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Other Squadron related Technical and Administrative Duties

(#) It is worth noting that testing highlighted a number of serious problems with the operational handling of the Halifax, resulting in ongoing changes to its design.

Some of the pilots from 1941


Events

BENINGBROUGH HALL

With the influx of airmen into RAF Linton-On-Ouse in April 1941, the Air Ministry requisitioned Beningbrough Hall (approx. 3 miles from the airfield) to accommodate all Non Commissioned Air Crew.


AIRFIELD ATTACK

The airfield at Linton-On-Ouse was attacked by enemy aircraft on 11/12th May 1941
– read more –


L9506 at West Raynham (IWM H10315)

L9506 at West Raynham on 6th June 1941
(IWM H10315)


2nd AIRFIELD ATTACK

No. 4 Group’s Operations Record Book shows that the airfield at Linton-on-Ouse was attacked by enemy aircraft on 17th August 1941 at 03.11 hours.

Superficial damage was done to one dispersal point. 1 aircraft dropped 10 HE bombs.


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (on loan or from its own establishment):

HALIFAX PROTOTYPE
(DUAL CONTROL)


HALIFAX HP57 B MKI [Series 1 and 2]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


HALIFAX HP57 B MKI (Series 3)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


HALIFAX HP59 B MKII (Series 1)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


HALIFAX HP59 B MKII (Series 1 Special)
(version shown has mid-upper turret removed)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following link provides more details on the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, including information on known losses and incidents:


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Memories of 1941 (Leslie Thorpe)

I joined the Squadron Easter 1941 at Linton-on-Ouse, I was at that time a Fitter 11A. My first work on aircraft was on the old Halifax Mk 1. This aircraft had finished its squadron life and was waiting to be returned to Handley Page for stripping down and a post-mortem to be carried out – read more –

1940 (Squadron Reformed)

No. 35 Squadron reformed at Boscombe Down (Wiltshire) on 5th November 1940, and was attached to the Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment (A&AEE). It was charged with “bringing the newly developed four-engine Handley Page Halifax heavy bomber into operational service”

Stationed at:

  • 05/11/1940: Boscombe Down
  • 20/11/1940: Moved to RAF Leeming (Yorkshire)
  • 05/12/1940: Moved to RAF Linton-on-Ouse (Yorkshire)

RAF Leeming [Courtesy of RAF Leeming Historical Training Facility]


Role

  • “To bring the newly developed four-engine Handley Page Halifax heavy bomber into operational service”.

Command

  • HQ, No. 4 (Bomber) Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • RWP Collings

RWP Collings


Strength


Activities

  • Air Crew and Ground Personnel
    • Building up to establishment numbers
    • Familiarisation with the Handley Page Halifax

Extract from the squadron’s Record Book (November / December 1940)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (on loan or from its own establishment):

HALIFAX PROTOTYPE (DUAL CONTROL)

HALIFAX HP57 B MKI [Series 1]

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1940 (after the squadron reformed), along with details of known losses and incidents:

1940 (Squadron Disbanded)

On 8th April 1940, No. 35 Squadron (as part of No. 1 Group Pool) merged with No. 90 Squadron to form No. 17 Operational Training Unit (OTU) and it ceased to exist as a separate entity

Stationed at:

  • RAF Cranfield / Bassingbourn
  • 01/02/1940:  Moved to RAF Upwood

Role

  • As part of No. 1 Group Pool the squadron was tasked with:
    • providing all ten squadrons in the Advanced Air Striking Force [AASF] with a reserve or pool from which replacements could be drawn
    • training the output of the Flying Training Schools up to an operational standard

Command

  • No. 1 Group Pool, No. 6 (Bomber) Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander WNM Hurley

Strength

Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training and Flying Training given to newly qualified air crew (pilots, observers and air gunners), to bring them up to operational standard. Training included Operational Flying, Instrument Flying, Cloud Flying, Bombing, Night Flying and Air Gunnery

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

FAIREY BATTLE

Fairey Battle Profile © Malcolm Barrass


AVRO ANSON

Avro Anson Profile © Malcolm Barrass


BRISTOL BLENHEIM

Bristol Blenheim Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following pages identify the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1940 (up to date of disbandment) , along with details of known losses and incidents:

1917

On 18th January 1917, No 35 Squadron mobilised to France. Having worked up to operational readiness, it moved to its first front-line aerodrome on 5th April 1917 and operated as a Corps squadron for the remainder of the year

Stationed at:

  • Narborough (Norfolk)
  • 18/01/1917: Mobilised to France
  • 03/02/1917: Reformed at St André-aux-Bois, France
  • 05/04/1917: Moved to Savy, France
  • 13/05/1917: Moved to Villers-Bretonneux, France
  • 23/05/1917: Moved to Mons-en-Chaussee, France
  • 13/07/1917: Moved to Savy, France
  • 19/08/1917: Moved to La Gorgue, France
  • 05/10/1917: Moved to La Lovie (Poperinge), Belgium
  • 17/10/1917: Moved to Bruay, France
  • 07/11/1917: Moved to Estrees-en-Chaussee, France

La Gorgue [Courtesy of White Family]


Role

As a Corps Squadron, No. 35 Squadron was tasked with providing medium and short distance aerial reconnaissance for one of the British Army Corps Commands. The role included:

  • Location of Hostile Batteries
  • Observation of Artillery Fire
  • Contact Patrol Work
  • Close Reconnaissance and Photography
  • Offensive action against vulnerable points in the Army reconnaissance area

Command

  • 7th Wing, Training Brigade (UK)
  • January 1917: 1st Corps Wing, HQ 1st Brigade, RFC(Attached to the Cavalry Corps [III Army])
  • xx/xx/1917: 12th Corps Wing, 3rd Brigade, RFC (Attached to the Cavalry Corps [III Army])

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer(s)
    • Major BF Vernon-Harcourt
    • 21/02/1917: Handed over to AV Holt

Strength (HQ and 3 Flights)

(*) Trainee Pilots were also “on attachment to the squadron” for Higher Instruction in Aviation, with Trainee Observers “on attachment” for Instruction in Aerial Observation


Activities (up to 18/01/1917)

Air Crew

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Squadron aircraft lined up at Narborough prior to flying to France [Air Pictorial]

Activities (18/01/1917 to 03/02/1917)

Air Crew and Ground Personnel

Activities (03/02/1917 to 05/04/1917)

Air Crew

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Activities (from 5th April 1917)

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Conversion Training
  • Operational Training
  • Operational duties as a “Corps Squadron”

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Extract from Flying Log Book of Graham Baron Ash [Courtesy of Andrew Pentland]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types:

ARMSTRONG WHITWORTH FK8
(for day to day training and operational use)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


ROYAL AIRCRAFT FACTORY BE2c and BE2d
(for Communication Flights between January and April 1917)

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following pages identify the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Narborough and whilst mobilised to France, along with details of known losses and incidents:

Halifax LV866 (24/02/1944)

Halifax LV866 was one of twenty one No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Schweinfurt on the night of the 24th / 25th February 1944.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Garnett Cyril John (Pilot)
  • Lumley Charles Lawless-Pyne (Navigator)
  • Derrick Ernest Coleman (Air Bomber)
  • Stephen Joseph Shippen (Wireless Operator)
  • Douglas Ferguson Fyfe (Air Gunner)
  • George Edward Lille (Air Gunner)
  • Malcolm Scholes (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Halifax LV860 landed without brake pressure and collided with stationery Halifax LV866, both aircraft being damaged.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 1180 

Undercarriage bogged down at end of runway after overshooting. Struck by LV860 which also overshot runway. [Forgot to check brake pressure; overshot by 20 yards and got bogged but no damage prior to collision]

AM Form 78 

The movement card shows that the aircraft was classified as Cat FB/AC; it was repaired on site and reallocated to No. 10 Squadron on 1st April 1944


Halifax L9524 (18/09/1941 [Non Op])

The AM Form 1180 shows “Pilot (P/O Creswell) overshot runway (Linton-on-Ouse), brakes applied too late. Swung at end of run and tail wheel struck built up earth”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft remained on charge of the squadron; it was operational again by 29th September 1941

Halifax L9501 (24/07/1941)

Halifax L9501 was one of nine No. 35 Squadron aircraft which took off from Stanton Harcourt to attack the Battleship Scharnhorst (anchored at La Pallice) on 24th July 1941 (daylight raid).

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Robert Fenwick Owen (Pilot)
  • Leslie Alec Hayward (2nd Pilot)
  • Eric Arthur Fawns Gibb (Observer)
  • [-] Hogg (WOP / AG)
  • Herbert Reginald Higgins (Air Gunner)
  • Rodney Gordon Mullally (Air Gunner)
  • James William Hays (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “During the attack, enemy fighters delivered, in all, ten attacks on Halifax L9501, one being claimed as shot down. Great coolness and deliberation was shown by Sgt Higgins, the tail gunner in fighting back and successfully defending his aircraft. On seeing an apparently disabled Halifax being attacked by two ME 109’s he directed his Captain to the scene of the combat and succeeded in drawing off one of the attackers”.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Journey to the target

The squadron’s Operations Record Book describes the journey to the target as follows:

“The aircraft took off and proceeded via Lizard Point to a point 50 miles west of Ushant and then direct to the target. The journey from base to the turning point was made at a height of 1,000 feet and below, with the climb to the bombing height taking place between this point and the target. 19,000 feet was the intended bombing height but only 15,000 feet was reached before arrival at the target area. The weather was excellent, brilliant sunshine and no cloud, with perfect visibility.

An enemy destroyer was passed in the proximity of the Île d’Yeu, which, apparently believing itself to be under attack, commenced evasive action and opened fire, but did no damage”.

It was assumed that the destroyer warned the authorities of the impending attack and the German defences were fully prepared for the arrival of the aircraft”.

The squadron’s Operations Record Book goes on to describe the arrival and subsequent attack as follows:

“As the squadron approached the target area, a very heavy barrage of A.A. fire was immediately put up, and some 30 enemy fighters were observed, some in the air and others taking off from aerodromes in and about La Rochelle”.

AM Form 1180

The AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows that the aircraft forced landed at Weston Zoyland (Somerset) due to fuel shortage

There appears to have been minimal damage to the aircraft as the aircraft remained on charge of the squadron and was operational again (with much the same crew) on 30th July 1941


Halifax HR863 (09/07/1943)

Halifax HR863 was one of nine No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Gelsenkirchen on the night of 9th / 10th July 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Edmund Solomon (Pilot)
  • Horatius Douglas Stewart White (Navigator)
  • Donald William McGlashan Archer (Air Bomber)
  • Stanislaus Cyril McKiernan (Wireless Operator)
  • Alexander Stephen (Air Gunner)
  • Ronald Cecil Davies (Air Gunner)
  • Alfred Norman Leslie Moss (Flight Engineer)

The route was Happisburgh, Texel, 5215N 0705E, Gelsenkirchen, 5040N 0725E, 5005N 0635E, 5000N 0115E, Beachy Head, Reading

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Both the bomb aimer and the navigator were hit by flak at position of green steady but bombed successfully.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Citation for HDS White

One night in July 1943 this airman was navigator of an aircraft detailed for an operation against Gelsenkirchen. On the outward flight, whilst many miles from the target, the bomber was his by anti-aircraft fire. Sergeant White sustained 3 wounds in the leg but, in spite of considerable pain, he continued to navigate the bomber to the target which was successfully attacked. On the return flight he made light of his injuries and remained at his station to navigate the aircraft safely back to base when he collapsed through loss of blood. Sergeant White displayed outstanding fortitude and courage, setting an example worthy of high praise.’


Notes:

  1. HDS White (Navigator) was posted to RAF Wyton as N/E (Sick) on 29th August 1943, returning to the squadron on 12th September 1943.
  2. DWM Archer (Air Bomber) had returned to operational duties by 24th July 1943

1916

No. 35 Squadron formed at Thetford Aerodrome (Norfolk) [from a nucleus of No. 9 Squadron] on 1st February 1916. It spent the rest of the year working up to operational strength, in readiness for mobilisation to France

Stationed at:

  • 01/02/1916: Thetford (Norfolk)
  • 16/06/1916: Moved to Narborough (Norfolk)
Thetford 1916.jpg

Role

As a Corps Squadron, No. 35 Squadron was tasked with providing medium and short distance aerial reconnaissance for one of the British Army Corps Commands. The role included:

  • Location of Hostile Batteries
  • Observation of Artillery Fire
  • Contact Patrol Work
  • Close Reconnaissance and Photography
  • Offensive action against vulnerable points in the Army reconnaissance area

Command

  • 01/02/1916: 6th Wing, VI Brigade RFC
  • 01/05/1916: Transferred to 7th Wing, VI Brigade RFC (i)
  • 20/07/1916: 7th Wing, Training Brigade RFC (ii)

(i) when the UK Wings were reconfigured on a regional basis
(ii) when VI Brigade RFC was renamed Training Brigade


Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Major BF Vernon-Harcourt

BF Vernon-Harcourt


Strength (Working up to Headquarters and Three Flights)

(*) Pilots were also “on attachment to the squadron” for Higher Instruction in Aviation, with Observers “on attachment” for Instruction in Aerial Observation

35atNarborough

Personnel at Narborough (possibly the five men sent from Cavalry Corps to assist with training) [Source: Narborough History Association]


Activities

Air Crew (*)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

(*) Training was carried out at Thetford and Narborough and offsite at RFC Schools and Manufacturers

Extract from C Williams’ Flying Log Book (Receiving “Instruction in Aerial Observation”)
[Courtesy of Cyril Williams]


Routine October 1916.JPG

The daily routine for the winter months (issued 28th October 1916)


Aircraft

VARIOUS TRAINING AIRCRAFT

The squadron utilised a wide variety of training aircraft whilst it worked up to operational readiness at Thetford and Narborough

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


ARMSTRONG-WHITWORTH FK8

In October 1916, the squadron took delivery of the first of its designated service aircraft, the Armstrong-Whitworth FK8, which it would utilise whilst mobilised to France

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following links provide more details about the aircraft that were on charge of the squadron, along with information on known losses and incidents:

Halifax HX169 (22/10/1943)

Halifax HX169 was one of twenty-two No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Kassel on the night of the 22nd / 23rd October 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Randall Vincent Jones (Pilot)
  • Horatius Douglas Stewart White (Navigator)
  • Ronald Booth (Air Bomber)
  • Thomas Donald Henderson (Wireless Operator)
  • Gerald Carrell (Air Gunner)
  • Peter Ross Jung (Air Gunner)
  • Wilfred Arthur Jeffries (Flight Engineer)

The AM Form 1180 shows: “Aircraft hit by incendiaries from friendly aircraft whilst over the target area”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Halifax HX169

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC; it was repaired and returned to the squadron on 5th November 1943

1939

The squadron operated as a light, day bomber squadron until May 1939 when it was redesignated as a non-mobilising unit

Stationed at:

  • RAF Cottesmore (Rutland)
  • Detached to West Freugh (20/02/1939 to 01/03/1939)
  • Moved to RAF Cranfield (Bedfordshire) [25/08/1939]
  • Flying Training moved to Bassingbourn (December 1939)

In December 1939, with flying becoming impossible at RAF Cranfield due to the construction of the perimeter track, runways and hardstandings, the squadron transferred its flying training to RAF Bassingbourn. The squadron’s HQ and Servicing Flight remained at Cranfield.


Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories, in times of emergency
  • 13/05/1939: The Squadron was redesignated as a non-mobilising unit:
    • to provide No. 15 and No. 40 Squadrons with a reserve from which replacements could be drawn
    • to train the output of the Flying Training Schools up to an operational standard
  • 01/10/1939: The squadron amalgamated with No. 207 Squadron (also based at Cranfield) and No. 52 and No. 63 Squadron (based at Benson) to form No. 1 Group Pool which was tasked with:
    • providing all ten squadrons in the Advanced Air Striking Force [AASF] with a reserve or pool from which replacements could be drawn
    • training the output of the Flying Training Schools up to an operational standard

Command

  • No. 2 (Bomber) Group, Bomber Command
  • 03/09/1939: No. 6 (Bomber) Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader HF Chester
    • 12/10/1939: Handed over to Wing Commander WNM Hurley

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

On the 3rd September 1939, Britain and France declared war on Germany and No. 35 Squadron was confirmed in its role as a non-mobilising unit to train the output of the Flying Training Schools up to an operational standard


Activities (Up to 13th May 1939)

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing checks and assessments
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • None Recorded
  • Armament Training (live bombing / firing practice at one of the Armament Training Camps)
    • West Freugh (February 1939)
  • Displays (to ensure ongoing public awareness of the need for a highly trained, efficient air force during peacetime)
    • None Recorded

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Activities (13th May 1939 onwards)

Air Crew

  • Ground Training and Flying Training given to newly qualified air crew (pilots, observers and air gunners), to bring them up to operational standard. Training included Operational Flying, Instrument Flying, Cloud Flying, Bombing, Night Flying and Air Gunnery

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Events

As part of the Government’s “Municipal Affiliation of Squadrons” Scheme, the squadron was affiliated to the city of Shrewsbury and to the King Henry VIII School in Coventry in April / May 1939.

It has not been possible to establish why the squadron was linked with the school.


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

FAIREY BATTLE

Fairey Battle Profile © Malcolm Barrass


AVRO ANSON

On 12th July 1939, the squadron received two Avro Anson for use in training of observers and wireless operators. Additional aircraft were taken on strength throughout the year

Avro Anson Profile © Malcolm Barrass


BRISTOL BLENHEIM

On 8th November 1939 the squadron took delivery of three Bristol Blenheim IV, with a further two being collected later in the month. Additional Mark IV and Mark I aircraft were delivered during November and December

Bristol Blenheim Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following pages identify the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1939, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1938

The squadron operated as a light, day bomber squadron throughout 1938

Stationed at:

  • RAF Worthy Down (Hampshire)
  • Detached to West Freugh (03/01/1938 to 30/01/1938)
  • Moved to RAF Cottesmore (Rutland), when RAF Worthy Down was handed over to Coastal Command (04/1938)
hangars1

RAF Cottesmore [Source: Angell Collection]


Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in times of emergency, in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories

Command

  • No. 2 (Bomber) Group

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader AG Thackray
    • 05/09/1938: Handed over to Squadron Leader HF Chester

Strength

Squadron at Cottesmore (Date not known) [Source RAFWeb]


Events affecting the squadron

On 29th September 1938, the squadron was placed on standby for an emergency move to Manston Airport, due to international tensions


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing checks and assessments)
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Observer Corps Calibration Exercise (July 1938)
    • Filming in connection with Air Raid Precaution Film (July 1938)
    • Home Defence Exercise (September 1938)
  • Armament Training (live bombing / firing practice at one of the Armament Training Camps)
    • West Freugh (January 1938)
  • Displays (to ensure ongoing public awareness of the need for a highly trained, efficient air force during peacetime)
    • Empire Air Display (May 1938)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Events

[Source: Flightglobal 20th January 1938]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

VICKERS WELLESLEY

Vickers Wellesley Profile © Malcolm Barrass


FAIREY BATTLE

No. 35 Squadron started to re-equip with the Fairey Battle MKI (Merlin II), receiving its first aircraft (a dual control aircraft) on 1st  April 1938.

Fairey Battle Profile © Malcolm Barrass

By 20th May 1938, it had its establishment number of 16 on charge.

In October 1938, the squadron exchanged its Merlin II aircraft for Merlin I aircraft from No. 226 Squadron and establishment numbers were increased from 16 to 21.

(Note: The squadron aircraft were grounded following the force landing of K9179 on 20th June 1938 to enable Rolls Royce engineers to check the boost control valve needles).

The following pages identify the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1938, along with details of known losses and incidents:


1937

The squadron operated as a light, day bomber squadron throughout 1937

Stationed at:

  • RAF Worthy Down (Hampshire)
  • Detached to Aldergrove (12/04/1937 to 01/05/1937)

Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in times of emergency, in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories

Command

  • No. 2 (Bomber) Group, Bomber Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader AG Thackray

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing checks and assessments
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • No. 2 (Bomber) Group Exercises (August 1937)
  • Armament Training (live bombing / firing practice at one of the Armament Training Camps)
    • Aldegrove (April)
  • Displays (to ensure ongoing public awareness of the need for a highly trained, efficient air force during peacetime)
    • Coronation Duties [Andover] (May 1937)
    • Coronation Duties [Cardiff] (July 1937)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Events

21st Birthday Celebrations
[Source: Flightglobal 14th January 1937]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

FAIREY GORDON

Fairey Gordon Profile © Malcolm Barrass


VICKERS WELLESLEY

No. 35 Squadron took delivery of its first Vickers Wellesley on 15th July 1937.

Vickers Wellesley Profile © Malcolm Barrass

In August 1937, a Wellesley Development Flight was established in “A” Flight to do 500 hours of development trials (using K7736, K7738 and K7739). K7751 was transferred to the development flight following the loss of K7738.

The following pages identify the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1937, along with details of known losses and incidents:

Canberra T4 WJ861 (31/08/1954)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “On the night of 31st August 1954, RM Crawford carried out a “wheels up” landing in Canberra T4 WJ861.

The cause of the accident was the failure of the starboard undercarriage door sequence valve operating link which prevented the lowering of the starboard undercarriage.

The damage incurred included buckling of the nose wheel doors, damage to the underskin forward of the nose wheel doors, damage to the port flaps, slight damage around the accumulator stowage and buckling and damage to frames 12b and 13.

The aircraft has been placed CAT3 and a MU working party was due to start repair work on 30th September”

 

1936

The squadron operated as a light, day bomber squadron throughout 1936

Stationed at:

  • Ed Damer, Sudan
  • Moved to Gebeit (April 1936)
  • Sudan to UK (14/08/1936 to 29/08/1936)
  • RAF Worthy Down (Hampshire) (From 29/08/1936)
accommodation

RAF Worthy Down [Source: Angell Collection]


Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in times of emergency, in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories

Command

  • No. 5 Wing, Middle East Command
  • 29/08/1936: No. 2 (Bomber) Group

It is worth noting that whilst the squadron was overseas, there were two changes in the organisation of the Home Commands:

In May 1936 the Central Area was split and renamed No. 1 (Bomber) Group and No. 2 (Bomber) Group, the Western Area was renamed No. 3 (Bomber) Group and No. 1 Air Defence Group became No. 6 (Auxiliary) Group.

In July 1936 the Air Defence of Great Britain was disbanded; No. 1 (Bomber) Group, No. 2 (Bomber) Group, No. 3 (Bomber) Group and No. 6 (Auxiliary) Group were transferred to the newly formed Bomber Command, with the Fighting Area being transferred to Fighter Command.


Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader C.W. Hill
    • 02/10/1936: Squadron Leader AG Thackray

Strength


Events affecting 35 Squadron

The squadron completed its detachment to the Sudan and returned to the UK in August 1936, reassembling at RAF Worthy Down, before proceeding on Overseas Leave


Activities (Sudan)

  • Air Crew
    • Up to 14/08/1936: Operational activities including:
      • border patrols
      • provision of a mail service
      • reconnaissance work
  • Ground Personnel
    • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
    • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Extract from R Ross Log Book [MAHC]

Activities (Sudan to UK)

From 14/08/1936 to 29/08/1936 the squadron travelled back from Sudan to UK.

Activities (UK)

Having arrived back in the UK (29/08/1936) and taken overseas leave, the squadron spent time acquiring personnel, aircraft and equipment, to bring it back up to operational strength. Many of its aircraft were reassembled and delivered from the Packing Depot at RAF Sealand, where they had been left after the squadron had returned from Sudan.


Events

Approval and presentation of the Squadron Badge
[Source: Flightglobal 14th January 1937]


The Badge was formally presented by Air Chief Marshall Sir John M Steel at a parade at Worthy Down on 18th December 1936.


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

GordonProfile

FAIREY GORDON

Fairey Gordon Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1936, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1935

The squadron operated as a light, day bomber squadron throughout 1935

Stationed at:

  • Bircham Newton (Norfolk)
  • Detached to Mildenhall (01/07/1935 to 06/07/1935)
  • Detached to Catfoss (19/08/1935 to 18/09/1935)
  • UK to Sudan (23/09/1935 to 18/10/1935)
  • Ed Damer [Sudan] (From 18/10/1935)

Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in times of emergency, in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories

Command

  • Central Area, Air Defence of Great Britain (ADGB)
  • 23/09/1935: No. 5 Wing, Middle East Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader V Buxton OBE
    • 06/08/1935: Handed over to Squadron Leader AP Ritchie
    • 22/09/1935: Handed over to Squadron Leader C.W. Hill

Strength


Events affecting No 35 Squadron

In 1935, the Italians threatened to invade Abyssinia (Abyssinian Crisis) and in September 1935, No. 35 Squadron was sent to the region as part of the RAF’s commitment to policing the Empire.


Activities (to 23rd September 1935)

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing checks and assessments
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • None Recorded (as parts of the Record Book are missing)
  • Armament Training (live bombing / firing practice at one of the Armament Training Camps)
    • Catfoss (August to September)
  • Displays (to ensure ongoing public awareness of the need for a highly trained, efficient air force during peacetime)
    • Royal Review [Mildenhall] (July 1935)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)
aerial-view-of-aircraft-on-aerodrome-during-royal-review-mildenhall-1935-raf-museum

Aircraft Park at the Royal Review

Activities (From 23rd September 1935)

Extract from Log Book of R Ross [MAHC]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

GordonProfile

FAIREY GORDON

Fairey Gordon Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1935, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1934

The squadron operated as a light, day bomber squadron throughout 1934

Stationed at:

  • Bircham Newton (Norfolk)

Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in times of emergency, in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories

Command

  • Central Area, Air Defence of Great Britain (ADGB)

Diagram showing the structure of the RAF Home Commands


Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader V Buxton OBE

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing checks and assessments)
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • None Recorded (as parts of the Record Book are missing)
  • Armament Training (live bombing / firing practice at one of the Armament Training Camps)
    • North Coates Fitties
  • Displays (to ensure ongoing public awareness of the need for a highly trained, efficient air force during peacetime)
    • King and Queen’s Visit (May 1934)
    • Empire Air Display (September 1934)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Extract from the Flying Log Book of RHM Ross
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Events

K2689 taking part in ADGB Exercises (July 1934)
[Air Pictorial]


Empire Air Day
Newspapers reporting on the visit of the King and Queen on 24th May 1934 show the following: “The King and Queen had a day of thrills when they visited the RAF aerodrome at Bircham Newton, Norfolk yesterday. It was their first visit to a Service aerodrome since the War and it gave a great impetus to the first Empire Air Day.


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

GordonProfile

FAIREY GORDON

Fairey Gordon Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1934, along with details of known losses and incidents:


1933

The squadron operated as a light, day bomber squadron throughout 1933

Stationed at:

  • Bircham Newton (Norfolk)
  • Detached to North Coates Fitties (07/05/1933 to 10/06/1933)
  • Detached to Tangmere (17/07/1933 to 21/07/1933)

Bircham Newton Airfield Plan (1929)


Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in times of emergency, in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories

Command

  • Wessex Bombing Area, Air Defence of Great Britain (ADGB).

In October 1933, the Wessex Bombing Area, Air Defence of Great Britain, was split into Central Area and Western Area and No. 35 Squadron was placed under the command of Central Area, ADGB.


Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader HMK Brown
    • 08/03/1933: Handed over to Squadron Leader JF Gordon DFC
    • 05/05/1933: Handed over to Squadron Leader V Buxton OBE

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing checks and assessments
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Area Exercises (April 1933)
    • Fighter Affiliation Exercise with No. 111 Squadron (June 1933)
    • Fighter Affiliation Exercise with No. 54 Squadron (July 1933)
    • ADGB Exercises [Tangmere] (July 1933)
  • Armament Training (live bombing / firing practice at one of the Armament Training Camps)
    • North Coates Fitties (May and June 1933)
  • Displays (to ensure ongoing public awareness of the need for a highly trained, efficient air force during peacetime)
    • Hull Civic Week Display (October 1933)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Extract from the Flying Log Book of RHM Ross
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

GordonProfile

FAIRY GORDON

Fairey Gordon Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1933, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1932

The squadron operated as a light, day bomber squadron throughout 1932

Stationed at:

  • Bircham Newton (Norfolk)
  • Detached to Duxford (03/05/1932 to 15/05/1932)
  • Detached to North Coates Fitties (23/05/1932 to 02/07/1932)

Bircham Newton


Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in times of emergency, in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories

Command

  • Wessex Bombing Area, Air Defence of Great Britain (ADGB)

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader HMK Brown

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing checks and assessments
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Camera Obscura Exercises [Scunthorpe, Theapston, Andover and Bristol] (April 1932)
    • Fighter Affiliation [Duxford] (May 1932)
    • Air Exercises [Hawkinge] (July 1932)
  • Armament Training (live bombing / firing practice at one of the Armament Training Camps)
    • North Coates Fitties (May and June 1932)
  • Displays (to ensure ongoing public awareness of the need for a highly trained, efficient air force during peacetime)
    • None Recorded

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

FAIREY IIIF

Profile © Malcolm Barrass


FAIREY GORDON

Between July and September 1932 the squadron re-equipped with the Fairey Gordon, a single-engine general purpose / light bomber

Fairey Gordon Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following pages identify the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1932, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1931

The squadron operated as a light, day bomber squadron throughout 1931

Stationed at:

  • Bircham Newton (Norfolk)

Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in times of emergency, in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories

Command

  • Wessex Bombing Area, Air Defence of Great Britain (ADGB).

Diagram showing the structure of the RAF Home Commands


Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader BE Harrison
    • 08/08/1931: Handed over to Squadron Leader HMK Brown

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing checks and assessments)
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • ADGB Exercise (July 1931)
    • Reconnaissance Exercise [Aldershot] (August 1931)
    • Reconnaissance Exercise [Salisbury] (August 1931)
    • Long distance, formation flying at high altitude exercise (including use of oxygen) (September 1931)
    • Mobilisation Exercise (October 1931)
    • Camera Obscura Exercises [Birmingham, Bristol and Lincoln] (November 1931)
  • Armament Training (live bombing / firing practice at one of the Armament Training Camps)
    • None Recorded
  • Displays (to ensure ongoing public awareness of the need for a highly trained, efficient air force during peacetime)
    • None Recorded

Note: The Record Book appears to be missing the pages up to July 1931

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

FaireyIIIFProfile

Fairey IIIF

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1931, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1930

The squadron operated as a light, day bomber squadron throughout 1930

Stationed at:

  • Bircham Newton (Norfolk)

Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in times of emergency, in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories

Command

  • Wessex Bombing Area, Air Defence of Great Britain (ADGB)

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer
    • Squadron Leader BE Harrison

Strength


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing checks and assessments
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • Camera Obscura (March and April 1930)
    • Fighter Affiliation Exercises [Duxford] (May 1930)
    • Fighting Area Tactical Exercises (May 1930)
    • ADGB Exercise [Upper Heyford] (August 1930)
  • Armament Training (live bombing / firing practice at one of the Armament Training Camps)
    • Catfoss (August 1930)
    • Porton (April and May 1930)
  • Displays (to ensure ongoing public awareness of the need for a highly trained, efficient air force during peacetime)
    • Hendon (June 1930)
    • Andover (June 1930)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Events

Squadron aircraft practicing for RAF Display (incl. J9797, J9800, J9820 and J 9822]


Squadron aircraft at the 1930 Royal Pageant, Hendon (Source: British Pathe)


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

FAIREY IIIF

Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1930, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1929 (Squadron Reformed)

No. 35 Squadron reformed as a light, day bomber squadron at Bircham Newton on 1st March 1929

Stationed at:

  • Bircham Newton (Norfolk)

Bircham Newton 1929


Role

  • Light, day bomber squadron for despatch overseas in times of emergency, in support of the RAF’s role in maintaining law and order in overseas territories

Command

  • Wessex Bombing Area, Air Defence of Great Britain (ADGB)

Diagram showing the structure of the RAF Home Commands


Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Flight Lieutenant LM Elworthy
    • 12/03/1929: Handed over to Squadron Leader GSM Insall VC MC.
    • 10/07/1929: Handed over to Squadron Leader BE Harrison

Strength (Working up to HQ and 3 Flights)


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training
  • Flying Training
  • Ongoing checks and assessments
  • Cross Country, Bombing, Air Defence and Fighter Affiliation Exercises
    • None Recorded
  • Armament Training (live bombing / firing practice at one of the Armament Training Camps)
    • None Recorded
  • Displays (to ensure ongoing public awareness of the need for a highly trained, efficient air force during peacetime)
    • None Recorded

Ground Personnel

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

DH9A

The squadron was initially equipped with “five DH9A airframes and four Liberty engines”. Additional DH9A were acquired and by September 1929 the squadron had 12 aircraft on charge.

DH9A Profile © Malcolm Barrass


FAIREY IIIF

On 5th November 1929, “A” Flight started to re-equip with the Fairey IIIF (with Napier XIA engines), a single-engine, general purpose / light bomber, with a two-man crew. “B” Flight started to re-equip on 12th November 1929. (C Flight re-equipped in January 1930)

Fairey IIIF Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following pages identify the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron during 1929, along with details of known losses and incidents:

1982 (Squadron Disbanded)

The squadron operated as a medium bomber squadron until 28th February 1982 when it was disbanded

Stationed at:

  • RAF Scampton (Lincolnshire), using Foxtrot Dispersal

Role

  • Medium bomber squadron, equipped for low level strategic bombing

Command

  • No. 1 Group, Strike Command

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Wing Commander NI Hamilton

Strength


Events affecting the squadron

The beginning of the end (Extract from the squadron’s Record Book)

“At the start of 1982, the Vulcan only has 6 months of its 26 years life left. 35 Squadron has only 2 months to go and the station is already feeling the effects of the rundown of the V-Force. At present plans for Scampton are for it to go into care and maintenance, perhaps to reopen as a home for Central Flying School and the Red Arrows. The squadron has eight aircraft at the moment in varying states of repair, although there is no longer much flying expected other than for rangers and Red Flag”


Activities

Air Crew

  • Ground Training (on station and off station)
    • Lectures / Courses in subjects such as Intelligence, Weapons and Aircraft Systems
    • Emergency, Escape, Dinghy and Survival Drills
    • “Trade” related Refresher Courses
  • Flying Training
    • As per Basic Training Requirement (BTR) Programme
  • Ongoing Assessments, Checks and Classifications
  • Rangers
    • Goose Bay / Offutt
  • Navigation and Bombing Competitions
    • Red Flag 82-2 (January / February 1982)

Ground Personnel

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations
  • Administrative Duties

Events

EXERCISE RED FLAG

Crew 58 represented 35 Squadron as one of the 5 Vulcan crews participating in Exercise Red Flag at Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada.

Crew: GA Willoughby Crisp (Captain), JA Barden (Co-Pilot), SG Mander (Nav-Radar), GC Daffarn (Nav-Plotter), RW Thompson (AEO)

[With kind permission of Elfed Higgins]


DISBANDMENT PARADE (26th February 1982)

On 26th February 1982, the squadron standard was paraded for the last time before being taken to RAF Cranwell for safe keeping. The final entry in the squadron’s Record Book reads “The Squadron Standard will be taken to RAF Cranwell for safekeeping on Monday 1st March. Sadly, there are no plans for this famous and honourable Squadron to reform”

[Photograph courtesy of Les Ainsley]


Aircraft

The squadron was equipped with the following aircraft types (from its own establishment):

AVRO VULCAN B2

Avro Vulcan Profile © Malcolm Barrass

The following page identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents:


Lancaster ME337 (05/01/1945)

Lancaster ME337 was one of fifteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Hanover (first raid) on the night of 5th / 6th January 1945.

It was carrying 4 x 2000lb HC (NI). Its designated Path Finder role was Visual Centerer.

Its eight-man crew comprised:

  • Jack Alfred Murrell (Pilot)
  • John Roderick O’Donnell (Navigator)
  • Albert Sidney Cubberley (Air Bomber)
  • Joseph Omer Dumas (Set Operator)
  • Thomas Ogden (Wireless Operator)
  • Jack Norman Oliver (Air Gunner)
  • James Johnston Black (Air Gunner)
  • William Reginald Eady (Flight Engineer)

The route was 5400N 0500E, 5305N 0700E, 5250N 0910E, Hanover, 5150N 0912E, 5220N 0705E, 5210N 0420E, Southwold

There is no information in the squadron’s Record Book regarding any incident / damage, but the AM Form 78 shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC; it was repaired on site and returned to the squadron on 20th January 1945


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 1180

There isn’t an AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) held at the RAF Museum and, as such, it has not been possible to establish any more details

Halifax LV782 (03/02/1944)

AM Form 1180

The AM Form 1180 shows: Swung on landing (Lossiemouth), ran off runway and collided with Wellington HE306. Pilot (Fitzpatrick) appears to have done everything possible to avoid accident

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FA/AC; it was repaired and returned to the squadron on 29th February 1944

Aircraft Crash Log (Compiled by Nicholas Roberts)

Swung on landing and collided with Wellington HE306 (at Lossiemouth)

Halifax HX157 (13/10/1943)

Halifax HX157 was being utilised for a cross country exercise on 13th October 1943.

Its crew comprised:

  • TW Hill (Pilot)
  • Others?

The AM Form 1180 shows that the aircraft swung on take off and undercarriage collapsed, due to pilot being taught to use brakes instead of the use of glide to correct swing


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FA/E (Salvage) and struck off charge of the squadron

Aircraft Crash Log (Compiled by Nicholas Roberts)

Swung on take-off for Cross Country; undercarriage collapsed

Halifax HR984 (15/02/1944)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Of twenty-four aircraft detailed for operations, twenty-three took off”

The AM Form 1180 suggests that Halifax HR984, captained by WG Barnes, was the aircraft that failed to take off.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 1180

Taking off, aircraft swung to starboard to avoid parked aircraft and …………… undercarriage collapsed. Pilot’s harness caught tail trimmer, pilot looked down causing ………..; a clear case of faulty airmanship and bad judgement.

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/A and struck off charge

Aircraft Crash Log (Compiled by Nicholas Roberts)

Swung on take off for operations; undercarriage collapsed


Halifax HR925 (11/11/1943)

Halifax HR925 was one of twenty-four No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Cannes on the night of 11th / 12th November 1943

Its eight-man crew comprised:

  • Desmond Ewart Abel Lander (Pilot)
  • Norman Sidney Francis Palmer (Navigator)
  • George Frederick Collier (Air Bomber)
  • Charles Hogg (Set Operator)
  • Albert James Wickersham (Wireless Operator)
  • Donald Arthur Alfred Swain (Air Gunner)
  • Roy Horace Wells (Air Gunner)
  • David Peter McDonald Thomson (Flight Engineer)

The route was as follows: Base, Selsey Bill, 49°20N 00°00E, 47°25N 01°00E, 43°18N 06°35E, Cannes, 43°40N 07°12E, 47°35N 01°20E, 49°20N  00°00E, Selsey Bill, Base

The squadron’s Operations Record Book has no details but the AM Form 78 shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/A and was off charge until 14th January 1944


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Aircraft Crash Log (Compiled by Nicholas Roberts)

Aircraft belly landed after operations

AM Form 1180

  • AM Form 1180 to be obtained

Halifax W7923 (03/02/1943)

Halifax W7923 was one of fourteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Hamburg on the night of 3rd / 4th February 1943

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • James Copeland Thomas (Pilot)
  • Gordon Henry Francis Carter (Navigator)
  • Richard Martin (Air Bomber)
  • Edward Roland Turenne (Wireless Operator)
  • John Napoleon Barry (Air Gunner)
  • William Joseph Freeman (Air Gunner)
  • Daniel Christie Young (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “When approaching to land at base, the undercarriage could not be lowered and a belly landing was made without casualties”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 1180

The Am Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows: Aircraft belly landed; pilot unable to lower undercarriage by normal or emergency systems.

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/A (but was subsequently struck off charge)

Aircraft Crash Log (Compiled by Nicholas Roberts)

Aircraft belly landed due to undercarriage failure


Canberra WH916 (18/02/1958)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “On the 18th February, F/L AD Ashworth had the misfortune to land wheels up at Mildenhall. Fortunately, although the aircraft was damaged, none of the crew were injured. At the time of writing, the results of the subsequent Court of Enquiry are not available”

Canberra WK125 (06/03/1958)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “On the night of 6th March, F/L A.D. Ashworth took off from El Adem (Libya) for a bombing detail.

After completing the bombing detail, he set course for Luqa, but during the latter stages of the climb be noticed that the oil pressure had dropped to 12 lbs per square inch. He decided to return to El Adem and land, with the port engined flamed out.

He joined the circuit and because be could not obtain any flap he decided to carry out an asymmetric overshoot. However, during the overshoot his starboard engine did not develop full power; he attempted to complete the circuit, but his speed and height rapidly decreased. He was unable to make the runway and crashed just off the airfield boundary. There were no casualties.

A Board of of Enquiry was convened and is now adjourned pending a technical investigation by Rolls Royce”

Canberra WH944 (25/08/1958)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “On 25th August 1958 the crew of WH944 encountered the old bogey of the split undercarriage jack and lost all hydraulics. This was at the end of a night bombing detail.

The aircraft was diverted to Wyton to make use of the longer runway when it was thought that a flapless landing might be possible. However, the crew were unable to lower the undercarriage and the pilot carried out a good wheels up landing on the runway.

The crew were uninjured and damage to the aircraft is provisionally classified at Cat 3”

 

Canberra WH916 (25/09/1958)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “On 25th September 1958, P/O WDE Martin in WH916 had an explosive decompression at 45,000ft. No crew members were injured and the aircraft landed safely at Luqa. On examination on the ground it was found that a portion of the nose canopy had blown out”


 

Canberra WJ635 (07/12/1959)

Canberra WJ635 was being utilised for a Gee H Bombing Exercise on 7th December 1959.

Its crews comprised:

  • DH Betts (Pilot)
  • FA Debelle (Navigator)
  • DR Somero-Joce? (Observer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Aircraft was forced to carry out a “wheels up” landing at Upwood due to malfunction of the port main wheel undercarriage leg. A successful forced landing was made and no crew members were injured”

Halifax W7906 (28/02/1943)

Halifax W7906 was one of eight No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack St Nazaire on the night of the 28th February 1943.

Its six-man crew comprised:

  • Donald Frederick Edgar Charles Dean (Pilot)
  • Dudley Peter David Archer (Navigator)
  • Alfred Edward Ralph Bexton (Air Bomber)
  • Allan Roland Ball (Wireless Operator)
  • James Russell Griffin (Air Gunner)
  • Donald Harrington Craig (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “During the outward journey, when the aircraft was flying at 13,000 feet, the port outer engine coolant temperature rose dangerously and the propeller was feathered, the aircraft gradually losing height down to 9,000 feet. However, St Nazaire was attacked in good visibility. Just after setting  out for base, the starboard inner engine failed, flames shooting out of the air intakes, and the aircraft slowly lost height to 3,000  feet. All preparations were made for ditching and the return journey was made through cloud. The aircraft was “homed” by searchlights and after further difficulties reached the aerodrome at Harrowbeer, the flare  path of which was extremely feeble. The Captain landed the aircraft halfway along a runway, 1100 feet in length; the aircraft overshot, the undercarriage collapsed in rough ground where the aircraft came to rest, no casualties occurring.

Note: The Record Book shows the aircraft serial as W7877, but this is incorrect


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

DFEC Dean Citation

DFEC Dean was awarded the Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross for his actions during this incident. The citation reads:

“One night in February 1943, this officer captained an aircraft, detailed to attack St. Nazaire. Whilst crossing the Channel, on the outward flight, one of the port engines failed. Nevertheless, Sqn. Ldr. Dean continued his mission. Whilst over the target area his aircraft was held in searchlights and subjected to heavy fire from the ground defences. Despite this, he pressed home a vigorous attack. Shortly after, the aircraft was headed for home, one of the starboard engines failed. Sqn. Ldr. Dean succeeded in maintaining height and eventually reached an airfield in this country where he effected a masterly landing in difficult circumstances”


Halifax DT519 (01/03/1943)

Halifax DT519 was one of thirteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Berlin on the night of the 1st / 2nd March 1943.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Harry Malkin (Pilot)
  • Carl Edward Sorsdahl (Navigator)
  • AT Williams (Air Bomber)
  • Herbert Alfred William Jolly (Wireless Operator)
  • John Meredith Fryer (Air Gunner)
  • John Thomas Stanton (Air Gunner)
  • Edmund Ernest Stocker (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Over Munster, caught in cones of searchlights, was hit by heavy accurate flak, 2 members of the crew (W/OP [HAW Jolly] and M/UG [JM Fryer]) wounded. Landed at Stanton Morley.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

H Malkin (Citation)

H Malkin was awarded the Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross for his efforts during this raid. His citation reads:

“One night in March, 1943, this officer captained an aircraft detailed to attack Berlin. Whilst over the city the bomber was held in searchlights and subjected to heavy anti-aircraft fire. The rudder controls were severed and one of the port engines was damaged causing it to fail. Despite this, Flt. Lt. Malkin skilfully controlled the damaged aircraft and executed a successful attack. Soon after leaving the target area, efforts to re-start the damaged engine proved successful, but further trouble was encountered. The bomber was again engaged by anti-aircraft fire, which rendered the port outer engine unserviceable. The mid-upper gunner was wounded, while all lights in the cockpit failed. With extreme difficulty, height was maintained and displaying superb airmanship, Flt. Lt. Malkin flew the damaged bomber to an airfield in this country.”

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC; it was repaired and returned to the squadron on 29th April 1943

HAW Jolly

HAW Jolly did not fly operationally with the squadron after this date.

JM Fryer

JM Fryer returned to operational service with the squadron by 5th March 1943

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7405 (28/10/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7405 was being utilised for a Contact Patrol on 28th October 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • J Officer (Pilot)
  • GI Thomson (Observer)

The squadron’s Record Book shows “Pilot slightly wounded”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

J Officer

J Officer was admitted to hospital and struck off strength of the squadron

[Source: RAF Museum]

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7402 (04/10/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7402 was being utilised for a Contact Patrol on 4th October 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • GR Haigh (Pilot)
  • LA Higgs (Observer)

The squadron’s Record Book shows “Observer wounded by bullet while flying over B14b at about 1500ft”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

LA Higgs

LA Higgs was admitted to hospital and struck off strength of the squadron; he died of his wounds on 7th October 1918

[Source: RAF Museum]

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records do not show where the remains of LA Higgs were located but show that after the war they were concentrated (reinterred) as follows:

  • HIGGS, LLOYD ALFRED Second Lieutenant DOINGT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION III. D. 16.

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7383 (21/09/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7383 was being utilised for an Artillery Patrol on 21st September 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • HC Heintzman (Pilot)
  • AE Harris (Observer)

The squadron’s Record Book shows “Aircraft had to return owing to observer being hit by machine gun fire from the ground”

AE Harris was admitted to hospital and struck off strength of the squadron


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Casualty Card (AE Harris)

[Source: RAF Museum]

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 B8822 (28/08/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 B8822 was being utilised for a Contact Patrol on 28th August 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • HG Harper (Pilot)
  • F Powell (Observer)

The squadron’s Record Book and the Personnel Casualty Ledger show that F Powell was wounded by machine gun fire


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

F Powell

F Powell was admitted to hospital and struck off strength of the squadron

[Source: RAF Museum]

Scott (ND) (19/04/1916)

The Squadron’s Routine Orders show “The Commanding Officer regrets to announce the death of 2/Lt. ND Scott, Royal West Surrey Regiment, attached to the RFC, which occurred through an accident at the aerodrome today (19th April 1916).

It is understood that his aircraft (make and type unknown) climbed too quickly and he lost control of the aircraft and crashed – further research required

“The Commonwealth War Graves Commission records show that his remains were buried at THETFORD CEMETERY Grave E. D. 132.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

ND Scott

The Casualty Card shows the following information:

JB Coward / CG Pugsley (26/03/1918)

The Personnel Casualty Ledger shows that JB Coward was killed and CG Pugsley was wounded on 26th March 1918.

The Casualty Card for JB Coward shows “This officer is believed to have been killed or wounded during a bomb raid on Amiens on the night of 26th March 1918 but no definite information is available on his fate has been received”

At this point in time, it is assumed that CG Pugsley was injured in the same German bombing raid


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

CG Pugsley

CG Pugsley was admitted to hospital and struck off strength of the squadron. His Casualty Form shows that he was returned to England

Pugsley Person

[Source: RAF Museum]

JB Coward

JB Coward was killed (or died of wounds)

[Source: RAF Museum]

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records do not show where the remains of JB Coward were located* but show that after the war they were concentrated (reinterred) as follows:

  • COWARD, JOHN BAYMAN Second Lieutenant ST. PIERRE CEMETERY, AMIENS VIII. F. 9.

* Casualty Form shows burial at British Military Cemetery, Amiens (reported by 41 Stationary Hospital)

H Hanson (24/03/1918)

The Personnel Casualty Ledger shows that H Hanson was wounded in combat on 24th March 1918.

He was admitted to hospital on 26th March 1918 and struck off strength of the squadron on that date

The relevant pages are missing from the squadron’s Record Book / Routine Orders and, as such, there are no details regarding the aircraft involved – however, it could be related to the loss of  Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 B3369 on the previous day – Further research required


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Casualty Card (H Hanson)

Hanson H Person

[Source: RAF Museum]

 

GJ Mortimer (25/03/1918)

The Personnel Casualty Ledger shows that GJ Mortimer was wounded in combat on 25th March 1918.

He was admitted to hospital and struck off strength of the squadron on that date

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Casualty Card (GJ Mortimer)

Mortimer GJ Person

[Source: RAF Museum]


Notes:

  1. The last recorded flight for GJ Mortimer in the available Record Book was in B5769 (piloted by 2Lt A McGregor) on 23rd March 1918, but there is no mention of any injuries in the entry (but they are not always shown). The Record Book then jumps from 24th to 26th so it is not possible to confirm whether he was involved in any flights on 25th. The Officers Casualty Form reaffirms the date as the 25th.

J Edelsten (25/03/1918)

The Personnel Casualty Ledger shows that J Edelsten was wounded in combat on 25th March 1918.

He was admitted to hospital and struck off strength of the squadron on that date

The relevant pages are missing from the squadron’s Record Book / Routine Orders and, as such, there are no details regarding the aircraft involved – Further research required


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Casualty Card (J Edelsten)

Edelsten J Person

[Source: RAF Museum]

 

Officer’s Casualty Form (J Edelsten)

Edelsten

[Source: casualtyforms.org]


Notes:

  1. Enquiry posted on WWI Forum 01/10/2018

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7491 (27/10/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7491 was being utilised for a Contact Patrol on 27th October 1918.

Its crew comprised:

  • HG Harper (Pilot)
  • EJ Richardson (Observer)

The squadron’s Record Book shows “Shot up by machine gun fire; Pilot wounded and observer died on the way to Casualty Clearing Station”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

HG Harper

HG Harper was hospitalised and struck off strength of the squadron

[Source: RAF Museum]

EJ Richardson

EJ Richardson was killed

[Source: RAF Museum]

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records do not show where the remains of EJ Richardson were located but show that after the war they were concentrated (reinterred) as follows:

  • RICHARDSON, ERNEST JAMES Second Lieutenant PREMONT BRITISH CEMETERY I. C. 3.

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7491

It has not been possible to establish if the aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron – further research required

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F628 (04/11/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth F628 was being utilised for an Artillery Patrol on 4th November 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • FH Hodgson (Pilot)
  • RLH Valentine (Observer)

The Personnel Casualty Ledger shows “FH Hodgson wounded (slightly hit in leg) by machine gun fire”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

FH Hodgson

FH Hodgson returned to duty after treatment

Casualty Card [Source: RAF Museum]

Lancaster PB754 (17/08/1945)

Lancaster PB754 was being utilised on an Operation Dodge sortie to Bari commencing  on 15th August 1945.

Its crew comprised:

  • GHW Slaughter
  • Others

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Shortly after it was due to take off from Bari on 17th August 1945, aircraft PB754, which had flown there on 15th August 1945, was badly damaged whilst picketed, by another aircraft  which swung badly on take off. The aircraft, which fortunately was unoccupied at the time, was severed midway along the fuselage”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Lancaster PB754

The AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows “Aircraft parked near runway with engine stopped and no crew aboard was collided with and severely damaged by Lancaster ME834 (No. 115 Squadron) which swung off runway on take off”

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) shows that the aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron


Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7406 (29/01/1919)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7406 was being utilised for a Travelling Flight (Flying machine to England) on 29th January 1919

Its crew comprised:

  • R Lazzari

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine left aerodrome (Marie Cappel) at 14.30 and after 30 minutes flight, engine cut out, causing a forced landing in ploughed field (Lieppe); personnel OK


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7406

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and the RAF in the Field

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 D5146 (16/09/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 D5146 was being utilised for a Patrol (57C.F.25.A.5.2) on 16th September 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • JE Phillips
  • RV Hepburn

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine left aerodrome at 10.00am and was struck by anti-aircraft shell. Machine fell to ground in pieces; personnel killed”

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and the RAF in the Field.

Post War

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show that the remains of JE Phillips and RV Hepburn were located at 62C.R.30.A.9.4

In accordance with government policy at that time, their remains were exhumed, formally identified and concentrated (reinterred) as follows:

  • HEPBURN, REGINALD VICTOR Second Lieutenant STE. EMILIE VALLEY CEMETERY, VILLERS-FAUCON II. D. 1.
  • PHILLIPS, JAMES EWING Captain STE. EMILIE VALLEY CEMETERY, VILLERS-FAUCON II. D. 2.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Casualty Card (JE Phillips)

Source: RAF Museum

Casualty Card (RV Hepburn)

Hepburn R V Person

Source: RAF Museum

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F3475 (03/10/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F3475 was being utilised for a Patrol (62B. A.23) on 3rd October 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • JM Brown
  • A Gilchrist

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine left aerodrome at 10.15am and according to a report received was seen to fall at 13.00, one wing falling away from the machine, cause unknown, no bursts observed; personnel believed killed”

JM Brown and A Gilchrist were struck off strength of the squadron

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and the RAF in the Field

Post War

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show that the remains of JM Brown and A Gilchrist were located at 62B.A.4.D2.2

In accordance with government policy at that time, their remains were exhumed, formally identified and concentrated (reinterred) as follows:

  • GILCHRIST, ARCHIBALD Lieutenant PROSPECT HILL CEMETERY, GOUY IV. A. 6.
  • BROWN, JONATHAN MARTIN Lieutenant PROSPECT HILL CEMETERY, GOUY IV. A. 5.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION


Casualty Card (A Gilchrist)

[Source: RAF Museum]

Casualty Card (JM Brown)

[Source: RAF Museum]

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F6137 (03/10/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F6137 was being utilised for a Patrol on 3rd October 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • TE McMann
  • RLH Valentine

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine left aerodrome at 17.00 and at 18.00 was forced to land owing to engine having been burnt out; personnel OK”

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and transferred to 2 AD for repair


 

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7383 (03/10/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7383 was being utilised for a Patrol (Gillemont Farm)  on 3rd October 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • CS Booker
  • R Whitfield

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine left aerodrome at 13.00 and was shot down by enemy machine gun fire from the ground; Pilot: Died of Wounds; Observer: OK”

 

Post War

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records do not show where the remains of CS Booker were located but show that after the war they were concentrated (reinterred) as follows:

  • BOOKER, C S Lieutenant DOINGT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION III. D. 12.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Casualty Card (CS Booker)

[Source: RAF Museum]

Aircraft

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and the RAF in the Field


 

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7395 (18/09/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7395 was being utilised for a Patrol (with camera) on 18th September 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • MC Sonnenberg
  • J Clarke

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine left aerodrome at 10.10am and report received states that machine was brought down in flames (62C.F.25.B) by enemy aircraft; Pilot: Badly burnt; Observer: Believed killed”

MC Sonnenberg (Badly Burnt) and J Clarke (missing believed killed in action) were struck off strength of the squadron. MC Sonnenberg died of his wounds on 19th September.

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and the RFC in the Field

Post War

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s (CWGC) records do not show where the remains of MC Sonnenberg were located but show that after the war they were concentrated (reinterred) as follows:

  • SONNENBERG , MELVILLE CHARLES Lieutenant DOINGT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION I. C. 29.

His Casualty Form shows that he was buried at Doingt Communal Cemetery by a reverend attached to the Australian Imperial Force

The CWGC records shows that the remains of J Clarke were not located (or could not be formally identified) and as such his name is commemorated on the Arras Flying Service Memorial as follows:

  • CLARKE, JOHN Second Lieutenant ARRAS FLYING SERVICES MEMORIAL

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Casualty Card (MC Sonnenberg)

[Source: RAF Museum]

Casualty Card (J Clarke)

[Source: RAF Museum]

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7402 (04/11/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7402 was being utilised for a Contact Patrol on 4th November 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • MK McGregor (Pilot)
  • GI Thomson (Observer)

The Squadron’s record book shows “Forced Landing at Beaudignies (X3a.6.6). Controls shot away”.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

RFC Casualty Report

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine was forced to land in Forward Area and upon being brought in, inspected and fuselage stripped, damage was discovered”

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and transferred to 2 AD for repair


 

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7429 (15/11/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7429 was being utilised for a Travelling Flight on 15th November 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • CG Kitchingman

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine left aerodrome at 11.00 to locate AW B7482 and was wrecked on landing; personnel OK”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7429

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and transferred to 2 AD for repair


 

 

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7446 (20/09/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7446 was being utilised for a Contact Patrol on 20th September 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • HC Heintzman
  • HS Howard

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine left aerodrome (Moislans) at 5.00pm and on landing at dusk ran into a Nissen hut in trying to take off again; personnel OK”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7446

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and transferred to 2 AD for repair

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7482 (11/11/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7482 was being utilised for a Contact Patrol on 11th November 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • HC Heintzman (Pilot)
  • HS Howard (Observer)

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine left aerodrome (Flaumont) at 10.00 and on landing ran into a fence near aerodrome; personnel OK”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 F7482

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and transferred to 2 AD for repair


 

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 H4450 (09/11/1918)

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 H4450 was being utilised for a Patrol on 9th November 1918

Its crew comprised:

  • F James (Pilot)
  • EL Hallett (Observer)

The RFC Casualty Report shows “Machine wrecked in taking off at 09.45 landing on soft ground and hitting a ridge near aerodrome; personnel OK”


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 H4450

The aircraft was struck off charge of the squadron and transferred to 2 AD for repair