Halifax DT489 (05/10/1942)

Halifax DT489 was one of twelve No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Aachen on the night of the 5th / 6th October 1942.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Harry Burns MacDonald (Pilot)
  • Ronald Edward Wilkes (2nd Pilot)
  • John Baker (Navigator)
  • Edward Whitter (Wireless Operator)
  • Jack Reginald Ely (Air Gunner)
  • George Carpenter (Air Gunner)
  • James Ellis Jones (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Aircraft returned early from 20 miles south of Cambridge after being struck by lightning at 20.00hrs, the trailing aerial breaking off and the Flight Engineer, Sergeant Jones being temporarily blinded by lightning flash. A landing was made with flares still on at Wyton.


North East Land, Sea and Air Museum

XL319 (Scampton 1980s) [Courtesy of Andrew Molland]
Awaiting a photograph of the aircraft on display at NELSAM

Vulcan XL319, utilised by the squadron throughout its “Vulcan Era”, is proudly on display at the North East Land, Sea and Air Museum

In 2020, a portacabin was purchased to house an exhibition about its use by the various squadrons, so if you have any photographs, documents or stories relating to its use by No. 35 Squadron which could be included on the display boards, please get in touch with them.

Avro Vulcan (Coningsby / Cottesmore)

The following identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on establishment of No. 35 Squadron and then available to the squadron from the Coningsby / Cottesmore Pool(s), along with details of known losses and incidents.

Information regarding the serial numbers has been obtained from the AM Form 78 (Movement Cards); however other aircraft may have been used by the squadron for specific exercises or operations:

1962196319641965196619671968
XH425x
XH426xx
XH427x
XH443 x
XH536xx
XH555x
XH556x
XH557xx
XH560xxxx
XH561x
XH562xxxxxx
XH563x
XJ780xx
XJ781xx
XJ782x
XJ783xx
XJ784x
XJ785x
XJ823xxx
XJ824xxx
XJ825xxxxxx
XL385x
XL386x
XL388x
XL390x
XL391x
XM570x
XM571xx
XM572x
XM597xxxxx
XM598xxxxx
XM599xxxxx
XM600xxxxxx
XM601x
XM602xxxxx
XM603xxxxx
XM604xxxxxx
XM605xxxxx
XM606xxxxx
XM607xxxxx
XM608xxxxx
XM609xxxxx
XM610xxxxx
XM611xxxxx
XM612xxxx
XM645xxxx
XM646xxxxx
XM647xxxxx
XM648xxxx
XM649xxxx
XM650xxxx
XM651xxxxx
XM652xxxx
XM653xxxxx
XM654xxxxx
XM655xxxxx
XM656xxxx
XM657xxxx

1962 (aircraft loaned from Scampton)

XH426 XH427 XH443

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1963 (aircraft loaned from Scampton and from No. 9 and 12 Squadron (also stationed at Coningsby) and then from own establishment)

XH425 XH426 XH555 XH556 XH562 XH563 XJ780 XJ781 XJ783 XJ823 XJ824 XJ825 XL385 XL386 XL388 XL390 XM599 XM600 XM604

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1964 (from own establishment and then from Coningsby / Cottesmore Pool)

Aircraft initially on charge of the squadron but subsequently included in the Coningsby Pool were: XJ823 XJ825 XM599 XM600 XM604

XM604 [Air-Britain-aircraft-copy-slide-Vulcan-B-2-XM604-RAF-35-Squadron]

Aircraft available from the Coningsby Pool (and/or Cottesmore Pool from November 1964) were: XJ823 XJ824 XJ825 XM597 XM598 XM599 XM600 XM601 XM602 XM603 XM604 XM605 XM606 XM607 XM608 XM609 XM610 XM611 XM612 XM645 XM646 XM647 XM648 XM649 XM650 XM651 XM652 XM653 XM654 XM655 XM656

XM607 RAF Luqa 1964
[With kind permission of Jim Simpson]

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1965 (from Cottesmore Pool)

Aircraft available from the Cottesmore Pool were: XH536 XH557 XH560 XH562 XJ825 XM597 XM598 XM599 XM600 XM602 XM603 XM604 XM605 XM606 XM607 XM608 XM609 XM610 XM611 XM612 XM645 XM646 XM647 XM648 XM649 XM650 XM651 XM652 XM653 XM654 XM655 XM656 XM657

XM645 at Coningsby 1965

[Courtesy of Doug Charnley (original photographer not known)]

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1966 (from Cottesmore Pool)

Aircraft available from the Cottesmore Pool were: XH536 XH557 XH560 XJ825 XM597 XM598 XM599 XM600 XM602 XM603 XM604 XM605 XM607 XM608 XM609 XM610 XM611 XM612 XM645 XM646 XM647 XM648 XM649 XM650 XM651 XM652 XM653 XM654 XM655 XM656 XM657

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1967 (from Cottesmore Pool)

Aircraft available from the Cottesmore Pool were: XH560 XM571 XM597 XM598 XM599 XM600 XM602 XM603 XM604 XM605 XM607 XM608 XM609 XM610 XM611 XM612 XM645 XM646 XM647 XM648 XM649 XM650 XM651 XM652 XM653 XM654 XM655 XM656 XM657

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1968 (from Cottesmore Pool)

Aircraft available from the Cottesmore Pool were: XH560 XH561 XH562 XJ780 XJ781 XJ782 XJ783 XJ785 XJ823 XJ824 XJ825 XL391 XL445 XM569 XM570 XM571 XM572 XM597 XM598 XM600 XM602 XM603 XM604 XM605 XM606 XM607 XM608 XM609 XM610 XM611 XM646 XM647 XM651 XM653 XM654 XM655 XM657

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:

Avro Vulcan (Akrotiri)

The following identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were available to No. 35 Squadron from the Akrotiri Pool, along with details of known losses and incidents.

Information regarding the serial numbers that were in the Pool has been obtained from the AM Form 78 (Movement Cards); however other aircraft may have been used by the squadron for specific exercises or operations:

196919701971197219731974
XH557x
XH560xxx
XH561xxxxxx
XH562xxxxxx
XJ780xxxxxx
XJ781xxxxx
XJ782xxxxxx
XJ783xxxxxx
XJ784xxxxx
XJ823xxxxxx
XJ824xxxxxx
XJ825xxxxxx
XL391xxxxxx
XL443xxx
XL445xxxxxx
XL446xxx
XM569xxxxxx
XM570xxxxxx
XM571xxxxxx
XM572xxxxxx
XM573xxxxx
XM574xx
XM645x
XM646xxxxxx
XM647xxxxxx

1969

Aircraft available from the Akrotiri Pool were: XH560 XH561 XH562 XJ780 XJ781 XJ782 XJ783 XJ823 XJ824 XJ825 XL391 XL445 XM569 XM570 XM571 XM572 XM646 XM647

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1970

Aircraft available from the Akrotiri Pool were: XH560 XH561 XH562 XJ780 XJ781 XJ782 XJ783 XJ784 XJ823 XJ824 XJ825 XL391 XL445 XM569 XM570 XM571 XM572 XM573 XM646 XM647

XJ823 at Masirah Oct 1970
[Courtesy of Dick Yates]

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1971

Aircraft available from the Akrotiri Pool were: XH560 XH561 XH562 XJ780 XJ781 XJ782 XJ783 XJ784 XJ823 XJ824 XJ825 XL391 XL445 XM569 XM570 XM571 XM572 XM573 XM646 XM647

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1972

Aircraft available from the Akrotiri Pool were: XH561 XH562 XJ780 XJ781 XJ782 XJ783 XJ784 XJ823 XJ824 XJ825 XL391 XL443 XL445 XL446 XM569 XM570 XM571 XM572 XM573 XM646 XM647

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1973

Aircraft available from the Akrotiri Pool were: XH561 XH562 XJ780 XJ781 XJ782 XJ783 XJ784 XJ823 XJ824 XJ825 XL391 XL443 XL445 XL446 XM569 XM570 XM571 XM572 XM573 XM574 XM646 XM647

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1974

Aircraft available from the Akrotiri Pool were: XH557 XH562 XJ780 XJ782 XJ783 XJ784 XJ823 XJ824 XJ825 XL391 XL443 XL445 XL446 XM569 XM570 XM571 XM572 XM573 XM574 XM645 XM646 XM647

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:

Avro Vulcan (Scampton)

The following identifies the serial numbers of the aircraft that were on charge of No. 35 Squadron whilst stationed at Scampton, along with details of known losses and incidents.

Information regarding the serial numbers that were on charge of the squadron has been obtained from the AM Form 78 (Movement Cards); however other aircraft may have been used for specific exercises or operations:

19751976197719781979198019811982
XH538xxxx
XH557x
XH561xxxxxxx
XH562xx
XJ780x
XJ782xx
XJ783xxxxxxxx
XJ784x
XJ823xx
XJ824xxxx
XJ825xxxxxxx
XL319xxxxx
XL321xx
XL359xx
XL360xxxx
XL361xxxxx
XL390x
XL392x
XL443xxxxxxx
XL444xxx
XL445xxxxxxx
XL446xxxxxxxx
XM570xxxxxxx
XM571xxxx
XM572xxxxxxx
XM574x
XM645x
XM646x
XM647x

1975 (from own establishment)

Aircraft on charge of the squadron were: XH557 XH561 XJ780 XJ782 XJ783 XJ784 XJ824 XJ825 XL443 XL445 XL446 XM571 XM572 XM574 XM645 XM646 XM647

XL445 (date unknown)

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1976 (from own establishment)

Aircraft on charge of the squadron were: XH561 XJ783 XJ824 XJ825 XL390 XL443 XL445 XL446 XM570 XM571 XM572

XJ824 (1976)
[Courtesy of MAHC]

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1977 (from own establishment)

Aircraft on charge of the squadron were: XH538 XH559 XH561 XJ783 XJ823 XJ824 XL321 XL361 XL443 XL445 XL446 XM570 XM571 XM572

XH559 14-07-77 [Copyright John M Boulder]
[With kind permission of Andrew Molland]

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1978 (from own establishment)

Aircraft on charge of the squadron were: XH538 XH561 XJ783 XL319 XL360 XL361 XL443 XL444 XL445 XL446 XM570 XM571 XM572

XL443 (date unknown)

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1979 (from own establishment)

Aircraft on charge of the squadron were: XH538 XH561 XJ782 XJ824 XL319 XL360 XL361 XL443 XL444 XM570 XM572

XL361 (date unknown)

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1980 (from own establishment)

Aircraft on charge of the squadron were: XH538 XH561 XH562 XL319 XL360 XL361 XL443 XL444 XM570 XM572

XH561 (Scampton 1980s)
[Courtesy of Andrew Molland]

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1981 (from own establishment)

Aircraft on charge of the squadron were: XH561 XH562 XJ783 XJ823 XJ825 XL319 XL321 XL359 XL360 XL361 XL443 XL445 XM570 XM572

XJ783 (Scampton 1980s)
[Courtesy of Andrew Molland]


XM570
[Courtesy of Richard Pidduck]

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


1982 (from own establishment)

Aircraft on charge of the squadron were: XJ783 XJ825 XL319 XL359 XL392 XL446

XL359 (date unknown)
[Source: VulcantotheSky]

Aircraft losses and incidents (if any) were as follows:


Avro Vulcan (Colour Schemes)

Vulcan Profile (High)

Avro Vulcan B.2 Profile (High Level Markings) © Malcolm Barrass

Initially the Vulcan B.2 aircraft were utilised for high level attack and were finished in an “anti-flash” white paint scheme. When the  change to low level attack was introduced in 1964 the aircraft were given a gloss sea grey and dark green camouflage on the upper surfaces along with white under surfaces. Matte camouflage and grey undersides were introduced in the mid-1970s.

The first camouflaged aircraft to arrive at Coningsby was XM645

Avro Vulcan Profile (Low Level Markings) © Malcolm Barrass

Avro Vulcan (Crew Positions)

The Avro Vulcan was typically crewed by a Pilot, a Co-Pilot, a Navigator (Plotter), a Navigator (Radar) and an Air Electronics Officer (AEO)

The Captain and Co-Pilot were on the flight deck, with the Navigator (Radar), Navigator (Plotter), and Air Electronics Officer (AEO) on the lower deck (from left to right, facing rearwards).

Captain and Co-Pilot Seats

Nav (Radar), Nav (Plotter) and (AEO) Seats

Makeshift 6th and 7th seats were also available for use by personnel such as a Crew Chief who flew with the crew on exercises such as Rangers.

Sixth Seat

[Photographs courtesy of Stephanie A. Lawton (Solway Aviation Museum)]


Crew Positions in the Vulcan [Courtesy of Ron Powell]

“The following is an extract from the book “Shropshire Blue” by Ron Powell

“To enter a Vulcan, the crew climbed up a ladder and through a rectangular hatch beneath the fuselage, just in front of the nosewheel. Once inside, the two pilots carried on up another narrow ladder to sit side by side on their ejection seats beneath the domed cockpit. One of the three rear crew – two navigators and an air electronics operator – having telescoped and stowed the entrance ladder to one side, closed the hatch. These three then turned their backs on the pilots and, just behind the hatch, stepped onto a small platform, on which they sat side by side at a desk, facing backwards at a wall of instruments and radar scopes.

Some way behind this wall was the bomb bay – inaccessible to the crew, unlike in the James Bond film, Thunderball, where there was a door between the crew compartment and the nuclear weapons in the bomb bay!

Close to the hatch, was a sixth seat, which could be occupied by a passenger or an NCO called a Crew Chief, an engineer who flew with the aircraft when it was due to land anywhere other than its home base.

Only the pilots sat on ejection seats. To get out in an emergency, they had the option of pulling a yellow and black handle on the seat between their legs, or a similar one above their heads. Pulling either would blast the heavy canopy away, then fire them and their seat into the airflow. Separation from the seats was automatic, after which they could float down on their parachutes.

The rest of the crew had no such luxury.

To save costs during the development of the Vulcan, it had been decided not to provide the rear crew with an automatic means of escape, even though it was technically feasible. Instead, the rear crew were provided with assister cushions which inflated to help lift them out of their seats against the g forces likely to be experienced in a stricken aircraft. The Crew Chief or passenger lacked even this minimal level of support.

Once out of their seats, the rear crew had to step down to the hatch and pull a handle to blow it open against the pressure of the airflow. Then, one by one, they had to slide down the hatch and clear of the aircraft – avoiding bashing into the nosewheel if the undercarriage was down. Once clear, their parachutes were operated automatically by a static line attached to the aircraft. If this failed, they could pull the ripcord themselves like a conventional parachutist.

As you can imagine, in an emergency, with the aircraft doing heaven knows what, none of this was likely to be straightforward.

The nightmare scenarios were emergencies where there was insufficient time for the rear crew to get out before the aircraft broke up or hit the ground, or where, even if they managed to get out, the aircraft was too low for their parachutes to open.

The history of the Vulcan was peppered with accidents where the front crew ejected and survived, and the rear crew died in the ensuing crash. But there were also instances where the front crew seem to have stayed in the cockpit to die, rather than eject and leave their comrades to face death alone”


6th and 7th seat (Crew Chief) [Courtesy of Richard Pidduck] 

When flying on a “Ranger” to an away base where the aircraft would carry out flying operations or occasionally take part in Airshows, it was normal for the Crew Chief, a non-commissioned airman in the rank of Chief Technician to fly with the aircraft as No 6. Crew Chiefs were selected from the main aircraft engineering ground trades and given additional training across a spectrum of trades to enable them to make all the common basic repairs. They were also issued with flying clothing and usually allocated to a particular aircraft.

Although there were only seats for 5 crew members, No 6 would perch on a shelf to one side of the front entrance door, using his parachute as a seat, or back rest.

It was common practice also for a 7th crew member to be selected to go on overseas flights as a special perk, or thank you for good services to the squadron. As the squadron engineering clerk, i had managed to achieve enough smarty points during my 3 years with 35 Squadron to be in the running for such a reward.

Before any flight in the Vulcan, the “fortunate” one had to undergo emergency evacuation training in the special facility available. This was basically a Vulcan crew compartment suspended at an appropriate height in a building. Two methods of escape were practiced along with the whole crew. This meant escaping through the doorway, and escaping through the ejected roof space. The whole crew had to escape within a defined period to pass the test. It was also necessary to be “hung” to ensure that the parachute harness would not have harmful side effects if used.

1975 – 1982 (Ground Personnel)

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Foxtrot Dispersal at Scampton [Courtesy of Gerry Frew]

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks operated throughout the domestic, technical and airfield sites, providing essential ground services in support of air operations.

Engineering Trades

Maintenance and Servicing of aircraft and equipment was carried out by Technical / Engineering personnel, with work split between:

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults)
  • Scheduled maintenance work

Work was undertaken by personnel (a) on strength of the squadron and (b) on strength of the station.

Engineering Personnel on strength of the squadron were responsible for daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations (*) . Work, which was carried out on the dispersals, was only on aircraft and equipment that were on charge of the squadron.

(*) The role included:
1.Routine checks such as: before flight, after flight and turn-round servicing, operational turn-round and readiness checks
2. Aircraft marshalling and towing
3. Replenishment of aircraft fuel tanks, engine oil reservoirs and assisting with role change and weapon loading
4. Routine maintenance of aircraft ground support equipment
5. Minor rectification and assisting technicians in the repair of more involved defects

Engineering Personnel on strength of the station were responsible for ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults) and scheduled maintenance. Work, which was carried out in the airfield hangars, was on all aircraft and equipment that were on charge of all the squadrons based at the station. Major scheduled maintenance were carried out by personnel from a Maintenance Unit.

Note: Crew Chiefs (Chief Technicians) were responsible for the technical administration and co-ordination of the maintenance of specific aircraft. This involved liaising with the aircrew and the various trades regarding work that needed to be carried out on the aircraft and flying overseas (eg on Rangers) where they would co-ordinate personnel based at the “destination” airfield

Other Ground Trades

Other personnel carried out a range of technical and administrative duties such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support.

Whilst personnel in these trades were primarily on strength of the station (providing services to all the squadrons that were based there), a small proportion were on strength of the squadron, undertaking squadron specific duties


Personnel on strength of No 35 Squadron

Thanks to the following for getting in touch and providing a summary of their service with the squadron:

  • Les Ainsley
    • I served on the Squadron from 1979 until we disbanded and took part in the disbandment parade. I was an airframes Fitter/Techie and was on B shift.
  • Mike Gott
    • I was an engine fitter, detached to 35 on F dispersal when it returned from Cyprus
  • Ian Hopgood
    • I was a FLM on 35 from their return to Scampton in ’75 till I left in ’77.
  • Ian Nelson
    • I was a Vulcan Propulsion Technician from 1975 to 1980 on 35 Sqn at RAF Scampton
  • Mike O’Gorman
    • I served on 35 squadron from 1979 to 1981. Excellent times
  • Paul Blackley
    • I was a crew chief on 35 Sqn. (1975 to 1981). I had “MY” aircraft for which I held the inventory, it was XL443. If it was due to fly, or had maintenance in progress, I would take care of it, but we would look after whatever aircraft we were needed for. We flew away on rangers on a rota basis with various crews and using whatever aircraft had been allocated for the trip. Once our primary aircraft was airborne, we would look after another aircraft as required. Our principal job was to look after the technical administration and co-ordinate the maintenance required liaising with the various trades. We of course did the external “crew in” checks, see in checks and supervised the aircrew technical debrief on aircraft return.
  • Thomas Dignum
    • I was an air radar tech from 1975 to 80, mainly servicing the NBS systems; did a trip to Goose bay in the jump seat and did terrain following radar support for aircrew training. Detachment to Malta.
  • Mick Smith
    • I was a FLM on 35 Sqn on its return from Cyprus to Scampton until 1977. I remember going on a detachment to Shiraz in Iran. Very interesting place.
  • Trevor Sackett
    • I served as squadron supplier at RAF Scampton up to disbandment in 1982
  • Ron Gilchrist
    • I served on the Squadron from 1978 to 1980. I was the Sgt Pers Admin working alongside the late Wing Commander Roger Sweatman, and then the late Wing Commander Ian Junor. The Adjutant in that time was Flt Lt Geoff Lidbetter. On my posting to Pitreavie Castle to become PA to Air Vice Marshal Bairsto, Wg Cdr Junor honoured me with a 7th seat trip on a Lone Ranger to Goose and Offutt (8th to 21st February 1980). A trip of dreams. The crew, who were superb to me were, Scott-Skinner, Pat Chapman, Geoff Lidbetter and Al Collins. (Al Copplestone was Crew Chief)

Photo Gallery

1975

July 1975 MacGillivray Crew’s last flight with the squadron, celebrating with “on shift” Ground Crew [Courtesy of Derek Parks]

Chief Technicians Oliver, Hibbens and Lomas, with Wing Commander Atkinson (left) and senior Engineering Officer Richardson (right)

1978 / 1979

B Shift 1978-1979 [Courtesy of Ian Nelson]

1981

Ground Crew 1981 [Courtesy of Gerry Frew]
Top Row, Storeman, Hardcastle, Goodchild, Burke, NK, NK ,NK, Scrivener, NK. NK, Broughton, Neville, NK, Morgan
Bottom Row. Carter, Ross, NK, NK, Lear, Silverthorne, O’Gorman, Davies, NK, Pidduck, Frew, Uzzel, NK.


1969 – 1974 (Ground Personnel)

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks operated throughout the domestic, technical and airfield sites, providing essential ground services in support of air operations.

Engineering Trades

Maintenance and Servicing of aircraft and equipment was carried out by Technical / Engineering personnel, with work split between:

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults)
  • Scheduled maintenance work

Work was undertaken by personnel (a) on strength of the squadron and (b) on strength of the station.

Engineering Personnel on strength of the squadron were responsible for daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations (*) . Work, which was carried out on the dispersals, was only on aircraft and equipment that were on charge of the squadron.

(*) The role included:
1.Routine checks such as: before flight, after flight and turn-round servicing, operational turn-round and readiness checks
2. Aircraft marshalling and towing
3. Replenishment of aircraft fuel tanks, engine oil reservoirs and assisting with role change and weapon loading
4. Routine maintenance of aircraft ground support equipment
5. Minor rectification and assisting technicians in the repair of more involved defects

Engineering Personnel on strength of the station were responsible for ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults) and scheduled maintenance. Work, which was carried out in the airfield hangars, was on all aircraft and equipment that were on charge of all the squadrons based at the station. Major scheduled maintenance was carried out by personnel from a Maintenance Unit.

Note: Crew Chiefs (Chief Technicians) were responsible for the technical administration and co-ordination of the maintenance of specific aircraft. This involved liaising with the aircrew and the various trades regarding work that needed to be carried out on the aircraft and flying overseas (eg on Rangers) where they would co-ordinate personnel based at the “destination” airfield

Whilst No 35 Squadron was stationed at Akrotiri (1969 – 1974), all technical and engineering work (including daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft) was carried out by personnel on strength of the station Technical Wing (Centralised Servicing)

Other Ground Trades

Other personnel carried out a range of technical and administrative duties such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support.

Whilst personnel in these trades were primarily on strength of the station (providing services to all the squadrons that were based there), a small proportion were on strength of the squadron, undertaking squadron specific duties

Memories of a ditching (1943)

Drawing is taken from an article published in Flying Review in 1962 about the ditching of the aircraft


The following is a transcription of a handwritten account by my grandfather Flt/Lt John Wright (Jack) Armitage, about the ditching of Halifax HR929 and the eventful return of the crew to the UK
Transcribed by: Nick Place 8th January 2021


This is a true story about the experiences of a Pathfinder crew of No. 35 Squadron (No. 8 Group Pathfinder Force Bomber Command)

The ditching of Halifax HR929 (11/11/1943) took place on the 11th day of November at 23.00 hrs in 1943.

This story is told by myself, the Navigator, Flt/Lt Jack Armitage, after much persuasion by “Joe” Petrie Andrews our pilot and my very good friend for some 50 years.

The other five members of the crew starting from the nose of the aircraft were Air Bomber, Horatio Backhouse, a relief WOP/AG Henry Stroud (as Jock Berwick our regular WOP was sick), Flight Engineer, Taffy Morgan, Mid Upper Gunner, George Dale and Tail End Charlie Norman Barnett.



At briefing that night, we were informed the target was to be at La Bocca, large railway marshalling yards via Cannes in the south of France. The yards were supplying the transport for German Middle Eastern troops.

At this time, we had been operating as a primary blind and visual marker for some 10 months and had completed 37 ops including all the ops in the battle of Hamburg and several Berlin trips. The operation promised to be a ‘piece of cake’ after our trips to the rest of Europe.

Having crossed the Alps we reduced our height to 7,000 feet in order to drop our red primary markers. On our approach we lost an engine and judging by the sounds, suffered other damage to the aircraft.

After releasing out target indicators we had no chance of gaining sufficient height to climb over the Alps. We decided to fly to Sardinia. I gave course of some 180º to fly due south, when on E.T.A Sardinia latitude we turned 90 degrees to port. Here we lost another engine and shortly thereafter yet another engine. We then took up ditching stations.

As the aircraft hit the water at some 110 knots the perspex nose collapsed, the sea rushed down the fuselage and then out again taking with it all loose items including my leather Irvin flying jacket.

Our engineer, Taffy, pressed the automatic dinghy release button – nothing happened. He then pulled the release handle with a negative result. He then went through the escape hatch and hacked at the dinghy housing in the port wing root.

Whilst this was happening, Backy had returned to the fuselage to collect individual dinghies. A few seconds later he was found floating in the fuselage having been overcome by 100 octane fumes. Joe & George fished him out and at that moment the self-inflating M type dinghy self inflated (I should have been annoyed if it hadn’t). We all piled in and Taffy cut the mooring cord – seconds later the port wing rose high in the air and the aircraft disappeared rapidly.

Backy informed us later that his sister was in charge of the Dunlop dinghy section in Liverpool.

So, there were seven bods looking at each other in the circular dinghy, the water temperature was ideal for swimming.

We took stock of our possession, 7 tins of water, one verey pistol with cartridges, one chute, two canvas paddles a radio transmitter, an apple and a pocket knife.

Most of us were sick at this point through swallowing 100 octane fuel, we tried sending S.O.S signals but the set proved to be unserviceable.

We fixed up the chute to the dinghy radio poles and two of the crew took it in turn supporting the poles. I reckoned we made about 3 knots. The first night in the dinghy passed uneventfully and the 12th of November was ideal until 15.00hrs when a weather front became visible right across the horizon in the West.

The weather gradually deteriorated and by 18.00hrs the seas were mountainous. One moment we were monarchs of all we surveyed sitting on top of huge waves, the next we were surrounded by a wall of water. We took it in turn bailing out the water from the dinghy and when the light failed, we covered ourselves with the dinghy canopy and continued bailing.

In the early hours of the 13th we found ourselves in the water clutching the rope fastened to the dinghy base. Joe and Taffy threw themselves across the base thus righting the dinghy and we all climbed in.

Sometime later we were just North of Asinara Isle, about a mile I should say, when we had a devil of a job to dissuade Joe from trying to swim to the lighthouse. The chances were that this was unoccupied as it belonged to the Italians.

Around lunchtime we saw a cruiser in rather bad visibility heading due West. We fired several verey cartridges to no effect.

Darkness fell about 17.00hrs and we continued bailing out. About 21.00hrs we thought we could see land to the East. The following morning the land proved to be Sardinia and we could see Capo Testa which had a lighthouse and other buildings. Benito Mussolini had escaped from Maddalena the capital some 14 days previously. The Royal Navy were ensconced in their HQ in Maddalena.

Just before 23.00hrs progress was most difficult. The current was doing its best to take us North West to the Straits of Bonifacio. Had this happened we should have been on our way to the Italian coast.

Just before 23.00hrs we were only some 30 metres from the rocks which were at the foot of a cliff. It seemed ages before we finally made headway and climbed onto a large flat rock. Shouts from the cliff top assured us that help was coming and staff from the lighthouse using ropes helped us all to the top of the cliff.

We were greeted at the lighthouse by Commander Conté who previously had been a merchantman Captain. He spoke reasonable English and was most friendly.

We were offered ersatz coffee made with acorns which we all found unpalatable. Instead, we drank the remainder of our water!

We were informed that when the Italians saw our verey cartridges they reported to the Royal Navy that a German E-boat was in the vicinity.

After a good nights´ rest, the Commander cooked an omelette with 5 eggs which we all enjoyed very much,

Our arrival was reported to Royal Naval H.Q. Maddelena and two taxis were despatched to pick us up. After walking about a mile on rocks the taxis were waiting on what passed for a road.

The taxis took us to a ferry which we boarded for Maddelena. On arrival VAT 69 became the order of the day and a fine dinner in late evening.

Arrangements were made for a Royal Naval minesweeper to take us to Ajaccio Corsica the following morning from where we would be able to fly to Algiers in North Africa.

At 7.00hrs the following day we boarded a minesweeper with a crew of 2 officers and 120 men and proceeded to Ajaccio Corsica where we were greeted on arrival by the RAF rescue service who were very disappointed not to have rescued our crew as they had a record of 99 lives saved to-date.

The RAF replaced our uniforms with civilian clothes all labelled for discharged “sailors, soldier & airmen 1918”.

The following morning, we were taken to Ajaccio airport and boarded an Amercian DC3 bound for Maison Blanche Aerodrome, Algiers N. Africa.

Just before take-off, an aircraft flew low over the ‘drome and our DC pilot confirmed that it was a German ME 109. He informed us that German intruders were regular visitors.

We landed in Algiers with no further incident and reported to the FAR transit camp C/O, a young Flying Officer. We found the accommodation very much below standard and we left the camp.

We decided to contact North African Command HQ and a benevolent Group Captain fixed us up with a palatial room in the Albert Hotel. We managed to book another room at the Radio Hotel and shared the cost of this. We had our escape cash in francs and marks.

We received wonderful hospitality in the H.Q. mess. The Middle East types had not met a PFF crew before and were most interested in hearing about the air war in Germany.

We next contacted the engineering officer at Blida airfield and requested help in returning to UK.

He informed us that a glider towing Squadron had abandoned a Halifax Mark 1 Series 1A and that a ground crew had been left with the aircraft and had fitted a replacement for one of the engines. We later found out that the aircraft had been parked on a dirt strip for 6 months.

In the mess during our waiting period we had been looked after by Leo an American barman from the Bronx. He had volunteered to fly as a gunner; however, he was such a good barman I’m sure someone sat on his application.

He lived in a palatial apartment one floor below the US general in charge of Middle East operations, General Doolittle no less.

The answer to the mystery as to how he could afford such luxury came to light one day. Leo had been given permission to collect eggs from the farmers. He took a Gendarme in a jeep and commandeered hundreds of eggs which he then was able to sell on the black market. Leo used to send many dollars home and never drew his pay.

Leo really looked after our needs in the mess and when we told him that we intended collecting a Halifax from Mascara in the desert and that a Wellington would be taking us, he expressed his keenness to come along.

We four commissioned types decided to collect the aircraft and take Leo. We ‘promoted’ him to Captain, he provided the silver bars and we all boarded the Wellington at Blida.

The duties of the Wellington crew since arriving in the Middle East had consisted of coastal operations and they had no experience of interior flying. Eventually their navigator gave up the search. Backhouse started map reading and eventually we saw our quarry in a large field near Mascara.

The light was fading when Joe & Taffy found out that only three engines would start. A little later the Wellington returned to base and an American Lieutenant arrived. The Lieutenant was i/c food supplies to the town of Mascara. We introduced our ‘Captain Leo’ with some tongue in cheek – however everything passed off satisfactorily.

We asked our new friend the Lieutenant to find us accommodation as take off was impossible due to the state of the aircraft. He said that our ‘Captain’ could have his bed and that he would introduce us to the Gendarme who would help.

The Gendarme eventually came up with a flea ridden hotel for Backy & self – a large feather bed which was very depressed in its centre and a poor nights sleep.

The Gendarme then escorted Joe & Taffy to a French Foreign Legion barracks and accommodation was arranged in a 3 bed officers’ quarters. A little after settling down a Foreign Legion officer kicked off his boots and laid on the spare bed. He also put a newspaper parcel under his pillow – unwrapped same and produced a large fish. He then struck a match to ignite the newspaper over which he held the fish!! He turned to our intrepid aviators and said Mange? What a start to the day.

Our U.S Lieutenant collected everyone and we proceeded to the airstrip. On arrival we found the ground crew had lit a fire under the port wing and were in the process of cooking the plugs from the port outer engine. Joe kicked out the fire and told them to go some 50 yards away to sort the plugs out.

We noticed at this time an Arab with a camel and a donkey pulling a wooden plough at the far end of the so called runway. He had ploughed some 80 yards before being chased away.

On inspection the aircraft fuselage was found to have a spare tail wheel which we moved into the centre of the aircraft – also all walking areas were covered in mud.

Our Yankee Lieutenant informed us that the ground crew spent Fridays (their holy day) showing the local populace around the operational aircraft!

One of the snags with the aircraft was that the tanks had been filled by the French with 80 octane fuel instead of 100 octane – this causes a large drop in power. The intention had been to fly back to Blida over the mountains, however on take off we just cleared a 4 foot hedge and the undercarriage would not retract. Maximum altitude proved to be 1200 feet! We then had to fly over a winding river to the coast.

On landing the Chief Engineering officer inspected the aircraft and almost had a fit. He declared the aircraft unfit for further service and promised that we should be provided with a Lancaster P.F.F. aircraft that had been left at Blida after a shuttle raid on an Italian target. The aircraft was now 100% except for the radar equipment.

Joe had never flown a Lancaster- in the event he found no difficulty.

By this time, we had spent over three weeks in the Middle East and had purchased all sorts of goods to take to the UK for Christmas.

Middle East personnel had been invited to write home and send parcels so that by the time we were ready for take off the bomb bay and the fuselage had been filled. We also carried three passengers; a Lt/Col C/O of the 12th Lancers who had been in the middle east since 1940, a radar S/Ldr and a Fleet Air Arm pilot returning to UK for a Court Martial.

During our stay in Algiers we had spent all our escape cash plus a goodly sum received for our civilian suits and overcoats.

These we sold in the casbah which was out of bounds to the military. The French did not allow the Arabs clothing coupons consequently the black-market prices were astronomic.

Also to our advantage No. 36 Squadron were operating in the area and had been using the officers shop in Algiers -when we stated our requirements and our Squadron number no questions were asked. All our purchases were debited eventually to our service accounts in the UK.

When it was take off time (we had been routed to UK via Rabat Salle in French Morocco) we flew at about a thousand feet along the North African coast. We circled Gibraltar twice – none of the crew had seen it before. We then turned south to Rabat.

On arrival we reported to the G/Captain C/O. He was most friendly had never seen a Lancaster having dealt only with transport aircraft.

The aircraft was refuelled and we were informed that there was severe icing up to 25,000´; all transport aircraft had been grounded. Our G/Capt informed us that if we wished we could try to get above the weather.
We reached some 24,000’ experiencing severe icing and returned to Rabat.

Arrangements were made for all of us to stay at a Moroccan Hotel, all the rooms were sited on the first floor round a large open courtyard.

We retired at 1 am and at 2 am I was awakened by a large negress – some 18 stones I should say, sitting on my bed who held out a match to me and said ‘fume’! I told her to vamoose and went back to sleep. At breakfast the next morning it transpires that she had been to all the bedrooms.

The bad weather continuing we decided to go to a local cinema after shopping in the afternoon. Halfway through the main film the lights went on and a loudspeaker announcement recalled the Lancaster crew to the RAF station.

We were informed that it was possible to fly at 500’ to be below the cloud base. We decided to take off at 24.00hrs. The only serviceable aerodrome in the UK was St. Mawgan in the SW. All other stations were fog bound.

By taking bearings from occults on the Portuguese & Spanish West coasts I was certain of our position at all times.

I requested a D/F that is a position from our stand-in Wireless Operator. The result put us in the Atlantic! He said however it was a third-class fix – I ignored this and not long afterwards we landed at St Mawgan.

On landing a customs officer approached and requested permission to search the aircraft for goods on which duty would have to be charged. We informed him the aircraft had secret equipment on board and no civilian could enter. Joe then sent for a RAF Regiment guard to look after all the presents.

We retired to a local Hotel and after having showers and breakfast returned to the aircraft. By lunchtime we were aboard to take off for base. We literally hedge hopped all the way because of bad visibility.

We had been away from our squadron for one month – at this time we were senior crew having survived one more ‘op’ than another ‘A’ flight crew. Joe decided to let the boys know that we had returned and before landing decided to ‘shoot up’ the briefing room. He flew just above the building just as a visiting Air Marshal from Air Ministry was expounding on the dangers of low flying!

On landing Joe was put under open arrest and charged with ‘low flying’. The next day he was on the mat at H.Q. Huntingdon where A/V/M Bennett greeted him with the words “glad to see you’re back Petrie Andrews – the charge will be changed to ‘careless flying’ and your seniority will be backdated 6 months“.

We arranged for our station post office to send a 30 cwt van which the post office filled three time. The parcels were despatched in small quantities to avoid any questions. I filled my Riley saloon with an Arabic carpet, pouffe, oranges & dates etc etc…

We arrived at our homes in time for Christmas. Before leaving the Squadron, I put up a black with our new C.O whom I had never met previously.

I requested that our crew be given 3 weeks leave- one week for every 24 hours in the dinghy. He tried to get away with an offer of one week – we had information about our entitlement and he gave in eventually. He had his revenge when we re-joined the Squadron after leave, we were only detailed to fly to major German cities and missed out on the channel port raids.

Operational Summary (1946)

January 1946

During the month of January, all Dodge trips were cancelled until 1st April 1946, and Graveley’s flying programme was interrupted due to repairs on on all three runways.

With most of its personnel on embarkation leave in readiness for the anticipated overseas posting to Egypt in February, flying hours were limited

  • Flying Training included: Bullseye and Cross Country Exercises
  • Operational Exercises and Duties included: None Undertaken

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

February 1946

February saw the introduction of two new exercises, namely. “JINK” and “SINCUM”. The squadron’s posting to Egypt was cancelled for political reasons

  • Flying Training included: Formation Flying, Practice Bombing, Fighter Affiliation, Air to Sea Firing, H2S and Cross Country Exercises
  • Operational Exercises and Duties included:
    • 19/02/1946 Operation Jink
    • 27/02/1946 Operation Sincum
    • 28/02/1946 Operation Sincum

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

March 1946

  • Flying Training included: Familiarisation, Formation Flying, Practice Bombing, Air to Sea Firing, 3 Engine Flying, BABS and Cross Country Exercises
  • Operational Exercises and Duties included:
    • 02/03/1946 Operation Jink
    • 06/03/1946 Operation Sincum
    • 07/03/1946 Operation Sincum and Operation Jink
    • 08/03/1946 Operation Sincum
    • 09/03/1946 Operation Sincum
    • 11/03/1946 Operation Sincum
    • 13/03/1946 Operation Sincum
    • 16/03/1946 Operation Jink
    • 23/03/1946 Operation Sincum
    • 25/03/1946 Operation Sincum
    • 28/03/1946 Operation Jink
    • 30/03/1946 Operation Jink

All aircraft were grounded for 48 hours (19/03/1946 and 20/03/1946) due to unserviceable cowling brackets

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

April 1946

The squadron started an intensive formation flying programme on 8th April, in preparation for Operation Flower Drop and the London Victory Day Parade Flypast

  • Flying Training included: Cross Country, Local Flying, Fighter Affiliation, Formation Flying, Bombing Practice and Bullseye Exercises
  • Operational Exercises and Duties included:

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

May 1946

  • Flying Training included: Fighter Affiliation, Formation Flying, Cross Country, Bombing Practice, 3-Engine Flying and Air to Sea Firing
  • Operational Exercises and Duties included:
    • 04/05/1946 Dutch Tour
    • 28/05/1946 Practice London Flypast

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:


Extract from JO Pennington’s Flying Log Book [Courtesy of Paul Thompson]

June 1946

Considerable effort was expended on completing the kitting out of the ground and flying personnel on Operation Lancaster (Goodwill Tour of the USA) and the servicing of the aircraft involved. The special leave given to 35 Squadron personnel that were on the tour meant limited flying hours for the month of June.

  • Flying Training included: Astro Cross Country, High Level Bombing Practice, Loop Homing and Formation Flying
  • Operational Exercises and Duties included:
    • 06/06/1946 Full scale rehearsal for London Flypast
    • 08/061946 London Victory Day Flypast
    • 15/06/1946 Operation Wastage (unserviceable TI’s dropped in Cardigan Bay)

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

July 1946

See Operation Lancaster (Goodwill Tour of America)

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

August 1946

See Operation Lancaster (Goodwill Tour of America)

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

September 1946

Squadron personnel returned from leave on 6th September 1946 and on 10th September it started its move to RAF Stradishall.

  • Flying Training included: Formation Flying, Cross Country, BABS, Practice Bombing, Eureka, VHF Homing, 2 and 3 engine flying, Air to Sea Firing and H2S Exercises
  • Operational Exercises and Duties included:
    • 13/09/1946 Leaflet Drop over Gloucester advertising RAF Exhibition (7 Maintenance Unit)
    • 14/09/1946 London Battle of Britain Flypast
    • 15/09/1946 Battle of Britain Commemoration Service (Ely Cathedral)
    • 22/09/1946 H2S Demonstration

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

October 1946

  • Flying Training included: Local Flying, H2S, BABS, Air Sea Rescue, Cross Country, 2 / 3 Engine Flying, Practice Bombing, Night Fighter Affiliation, and Air to Sea Firing Exercises
  • Operational Exercises and Duties included:
    • 01/10/1946 H2S Demonstration
    • 25/10/1946 Operation Wastage

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

November 1946

  • Flying Training included: Local Flying, Cross Country, Air to Sea Firing, Instrument Flying, BABS, Practice Bombing and 2/3 Engine Flying Exercises
  • Operational Exercises and Duties included:
    • 05/11/1946 Operation Frontline

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

December 1946

  • Flying Training included: Cross Country, H2S, Practice Bombing, VHF Homing, 2/3 Engine Flying, Circuits and Landings, Air to Sea Firing and Night Fighter Affiliation Exercises
  • Operational Exercises and Duties included:
    • 12/12/1946 Operation Wastage
    • 17/12/1946 Operation Frontline

Aircraft losses and incidents were as follows:

Role of the RAF

Research Notes

The role of the Royal Air Force (RAF), its structure and its composition changed significantly over the years.

The following summarises the various roles that were undertaken in particular time periods when 35 Squadron were operational:

1916 – 1919

  • providing air power (support of ground operations, tactical support and air transport) during WWI
  • post war monitoring and policing
  • evaluating and introducing new aircraft

1929 to 1939

  • providing air power (support of ground operations, tactical support and air transport) to protect the UK and to help maintain law and order in overseas territories
  • surveying and opening up air communications to Commonwealth Countries
  • demonstrating the ongoing need for a high quality, efficient air force (Empire Air Days, displays, long distance flights, Schneider Trophy etc) [at a time when the government wanted to reduce its strength]
  • evaluating and introducing new aircraft
  • preparing for possible outbreak of war
  • (Manpower: Expansion Schemes 1934 onwards)

1939 to 1945

  • providing air power (support of ground operations, tactical support and air transport) during WWII
  • evaluating and introducing new aircraft
  • (Manpower: Included National Service personnel)

1945 to 1950

  • providing air power (support of ground operations, tactical support and air transport) to protect the UK and to help maintain worldwide law and order, from bases in UK, Europe, Middle East and Far East
  • assisting with the post war clean up in Europe, Middle East and Far East
  • commitment to NATO (from 1949)
  • search and rescue
  • evaluating and introducing new aircraft
  • (Manpower: Demobilisation and return to peacetime establishment / included National Service personnel)

1950s

  • providing air power (support of ground operations, tactical support and air transport) to protect the UK and to help maintain worldwide law and order, from bases in UK, Europe, Middle East and Far East
  • providing, quick reaction alert and nuclear capability
  • commitment to NATO, SEATO (1954 to 1977) and CENTO (1955 to 1979)
  • search and rescue
  • evaluating and introducing new aircraft
  • (Manpower: Included National Service personnel)

1960s

  • providing air power (support of ground operations, tactical support and air transport) to protect the UK and to help maintain worldwide law and order, from bases in UK, Europe, Middle East and Far East
  • providing, quick reaction alert and nuclear capability
  • start of withdrawal from Middle East and Far East (Aden) to focus resources on the defence of Western Europe and the North Atlantic
  • undertaking “Rangers” to ensure familiarity with the various theatres of war
  • commitment to NATO, SEATO and CENTO
  • search and rescue
  • evaluating and introducing new aircraft
  • (Manpower: Included National Service personnel [up to 1963])

1970s

  • providing air power (support of ground operations, tactical support and air transport) to protect the UK and to help maintain worldwide law and order, from bases in UK, Europe, Middle East and Far East
  • providing, quick reaction alert and nuclear capability
  • ongoing withdrawal from Middle East and Far East (Malaysia, Singapore, Persian Gulf, Cyprus and Malta)
  • undertaking “Rangers” to ensure familiarity with the various theatres of war
  • commitment to NATO, SEATO (to 1977) and CENTO (to 1979)
  • search and rescue
  • evaluating and introducing new aircraft

1980s

  • providing air power (support of ground operations, tactical support and air transport) to protect the UK and to help maintain worldwide law and order, from bases in UK and Europe
  • providing, quick reaction alert and nuclear capability
  • undertaking “Rangers” to ensure familiarity with the various theatres of war
  • commitment to NATO
  • search and rescue
  • evaluating and introducing new aircraft

Station Readiness and Dispersal (1962 – 1982)

Research Notes

Scramble 4-ship Finningley 1981 [Source: Fred Martin (Vulcantothesky)]

Bomber Command Main Airfields / Dispersal Airfields

The Main Bomber Force operated out of ten main airfields: Coningsby, Cottesmore, Finningley, Gaydon, Honington, Marham, Scampton, Waddington, Wittering and Wyton

In addition, it had 28 dispersal airfields: Ballykelly, Bedford, Boscombe Down, Brawdy, Bruntingthorpe, Burtonwood, Coltishall, Cranwell, Elvington, Filton, Kinloss, Leconfield, Leeming, Leuchars, Llanbedr, Lossiemouth, Machrihanish, Manston, Middleton-St-George, Pershore, Prestwick, St Mawgan, Stansted, Tarrant Rushton, Valley, Wattisham and Yeovilton

Alert and Readiness Procedures

The Bomber Command Alert and Readiness Procedures (1st August 1962) set out the Alert and Readiness procedures for the V Force aircraft and crews.

  • Alert Condition 4 was the the normal state of alert in peacetime
  • Alert Condition 3 (Precautionary Alert) could be issued (along with the action to be taken) to some or all squadrons in periods of political tension
  • Alert Condition 2 (Generate Aircraft) required the squadron “to recall all available personnel and to prepare the maximum number of aircraft to combat serviceability. Aircraft planned to operate from the main bases are to be prepared for operational take off and crews are to standby at 15 minute readiness. All other aircraft are to be armed and prepared for take-off to their dispersal airfields”.
  • Alert Condition 1 (Disperse Aircraft) required the squadron “to disperse its aircraft to their dispersal airfields and on arrival to be prepared for operational take-off; crews will then be at 15 minutes readiness as would the aircraft and crews at the main bases”.

The Alert Conditions were utilised in conjunction with Readiness States which were as follows:

  • “One Five” required all combat ready aircraft to be prepared to take off within 15 minutes
  • “Zero Five” required all combat ready aircraft to be capable of being airborne within 5 minutes
  • “Zero Two” required all combat ready aircraft to start engines and taxi to the take-off position and to await further instruction
  • “Scramble” required all combat ready aircraft to take off on their operational mission

Dispersal Exercises

The following exercises were utilised to test these procedures:

  • Mick: To test Alert Condition 2, with aircraft loaded with training rounds of Yellow Sun 2 (later WE177)
  • Kinsman: To test dispersal airfield procedures, with aircraft either flying unarmed or loaded with a “shape” (inert bomb)
  • Mickey Finn: To test Alert Condition 1, with aircraft loaded with training rounds of Yellow Sun 2 (later WE177)

Quick Reaction Alert (1962 – 1968)

Whilst 35 Squadron was based at Coningsby and Cottesmore (1962 to 1968), three QRA aircraft, along with one crew from No. 9, No. 12 and No. 35 Squadron, were on “One Five” readiness at all times.

Booklets / Manuscripts

The following provides a list of booklets / manuscripts (some of which are unpublished) which are known to contain squadron related material.


Manuscript – The History of No 35 Squadron
[Flight Lieutenant A J Brookes]

[A copy of this manuscript is held at Marham Aviation Heritage Centre ]


Booklet- A Rather Sad Beginning: Story of Halifax L9489
 [Dennis Hoppe]

[An original version of this booklet (donated from the Ron Gayner Collection) is held at Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Manuscript – Through the eyes of a trained observer
[Allan John Vial]

[A copy of this manuscript is held in the Australian National Archives]


Manuscript – The tale of the wanderings of 35 Squadron RFC from their aerodrome at Narborough, Norfolk, to Hesdin in the Land of France

[A copy of the original wording]


Booklet – The Loss of Halifax L9501 (Volume 1 and 2]
[Matthias Hundt]

[An original version of this booklet is held at Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Booklet – Just an Echo
[Audrey P Tucker]

[The diaries of Richard Tucker (Bomb Aimer)]

[An original version of this booklet (donated from the Ron Gayner Collection) is held at Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]


Manuscript – Cheshire’s 1941 Norfolk Rescue: the untold story of Halifax bomber L9524
[Anne Wells]

[A copy of this manuscript is held at Marham Aviation Heritage Centre ]


Manuscript – Nothing on the clock
[R Hilliard]

[A copy is held in the Australian National Archives]


Booklet – The Empty Bed
[National Trust]

Booklet accompanying the display at Beningbrough Hall regarding the loss of L9560


Booklet – The fate of Beningbrough Hall RAF and RCAF Lodgers 1941 – 1945
[Ted Summer]


RFC Structure in France

Research Notes

When No. 35 Squadron mobilised to France in January 1917, the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) in France consisted of a Headquarters Wing with:

  • Aeroplane Supply Depot
  • Aircraft Depot
  • Engine Repair Shops
  • Brigades

Chart showing structure of RFC in France
[Courtesy of Mike Meech (Original Source not known)]

Each Brigade consisted of :

  • An Army Wing, consisting of a variable number of squadrons
  • A Corps Wing, consisting normally of one squadron per Corps in the Army
  • A Balloon Wing, consisting normally of one balloon company per Corps in the Army
  • An Army Aircraft Park (a mobile depot of stores and spare parts).

Each Brigade was allotted to a specific army (eg 1st Brigade to I Army, 2nd Brigade to II Army).

Chart showing structure of “Brigades”

The role of the Army Wing was as follows:

  • Offensive action against the enemy’s aircraft
  • Offensive action against troops and vulnerable points in the Army reconnaissance area, as allotted by General Headquarters
  • Medium distance reconnaissance and photography

The role of the Corps Wing was as follows:

  • Location of hostile batteries
  • Observation of artillery fire
  • Contact Patrol work
  • Close reconnaissance and photography
  • Offensive action against vulnerable points in the Army reconnaissance area

The role of the Balloon Wing was as follows:

  • Location of hostile batteries
  • Observation of artillery fire
  • Close reconnaissance

Squadrons within each wing were organised into three flights, with each flight consisting of 6 to 8 aircraft.

1951 to 1961 (Ground Personnel)

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks operated throughout the domestic, technical and airfield sites, providing essential ground services in support of air operations.

Engineering Trades

Maintenance and Servicing of aircraft and equipment was carried out by Technical / Engineering personnel, with work split between:

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults)
  • Scheduled maintenance work

Maintenance, Servicing and Repair of Aircraft and Equipment was undertaken by personnel (a) on strength of the squadron and (b) on strength of the station.

Personnel on strength of the squadron were responsible for daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations (*). Work, which was carried out on the dispersals, was only on aircraft and equipment that were on charge of the squadron.

(*) The role included:
1. Routine checks such as: before flight, after flight and turn-round servicing, operational turn-round and readiness checks
2. Aircraft marshalling and towing
3. Replenishment of aircraft fuel tanks, engine oil reservoirs and assisting with role change and weapon loading
4. Routine maintenance of aircraft ground support equipment
5. Minor rectification and assisting technicians in the repair of more involved defects


Personnel on strength of the station were responsible for ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults) and scheduled maintenance. Work, which was carried out in the airfield hangars, was on all aircraft and equipment that were on charge of all the squadrons based at the station. Major scheduled maintenance was carried out by personnel from a Maintenance Unit.

When “Central Servicing” was in place (October 1956 to 1958?), all technical and engineering work (including daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft) was carried out by personnel on strength of the station Technical Wing

Other Ground Trades

Other ground personnel carried out technical and administrative duties such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support.

Whilst personnel in these trades were primarily on strength of the station (providing services to all the squadrons that were based there), a small proportion were on strength of the squadron, undertaking squadron specific duties

Life on the squadron (1957 to 1958)

I served at RAF Upwood from April 1957 to December 1958.

I was posted to No. 35 Squadron equipped with Canberra B2 aircraft operating in the high level light bomber role as part of Bomber Command.

The Canberrra had entered RAF service in 1951 and when the build up was completed there were 28 squadrons in the Command. The unit was an enlarged squadron formed from the amalgamation of No. 18 and No. 35 Squadons. Other units operating at Upwood at the time were No. 50 and No. 61 Squadrons. Each squadron was commanded by a Wing Commander and divided into 2 flights, commanded by a Squadron Leader.

A Canberra B2 carried a crew of 3; pilot, navigator/plotter and navigator/radar (observer). Apart from the 3 senior officers, crews were made up of junior officers. By this stage there were very few SNCO aircrew in the Canberra force.

The life of a squadron Canberra crew was governed by two regimes: basic training requirements and the Bomber Command Aircrew Classification scheme. The former was designed to ensure that each crew member completed the minimum requirements needed to maintain the necessary level of competence during a given period. With regard to the latter, a new crew was initially categorised Unclassified, which meant that they were unqualified to fly on operations. Flying hours were therefore allocated to a crew to achieve Combat status as quickly as possible, which meant meeting minimum competence in the role i.e. achieving the necessary standards as a crew in navigation and bombing. As a crew became more experienced it progressed through the classification system to Select status.

A crew would fly approx. 300 hours a year. A sortie lasted about 2hrs 50 mins and was largely carried out at heights between 35000 – 45000 feet while cruising at about 460mph. On a typical training flight the aircraft would be loaded with up to 8 x 25lb practice bombs which would be released at one of several bombing ranges around the UK, mainly in the Wash area. Bombing was carried out using a radar system called GH or visually using the Mk XIV bombsight. There were also regular Station or Command exercises, involving all the squadrons, that were used to test fighter and ground radar defences as well as crews’ individual navigation and bombing skills.

High level visual bombing practice up to 45000ft was carried out abroad. A squadron would fly off on detachment to Malta and conduct bombing exercises against a sea target at Filfla off Malta or practice ranges in Libya.

A crew could also be detailed to fly abroad on a Lone Ranger exercise to an RAF station in the Mediterranean or Middle East. This exercise tested a crew’s ability to operate away from base; crew members carried out their own basic servicing for which they had to pass a Bomber Command Basic Efficiency Examination. A crew would be allocated a Lone Ranger about once a year and was a very popular break from the normal routine.

When not flying, crews had to complete a programme of ground training. Requirements varied widely and included: dinghy and parachute drills; aircraft recognition; survival lectures; regular 12-mile walks to build up stamina; and escape and evasion exercises. Aircrews were also encouraged to participate in sport to maintain fitness.

I left Upwood on posting to RAF Shawbury but the Canberra squadron operated there for some time afterwards.

Both 35 and 50 Squadron were eventually re-equipped with the Vulcan.

[Courtesy of John Kirk, 35 Squadron Upwood]

1916 to 1919 (Ground Personnel)

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks operated throughout the domestic, technical and airfield sites, providing essential ground services in support of air operations.

Trades that were on strength of each squadron are listed in the Mobilisation Table as follows:

  • Headquarters
    • Squadron Commander, Flying Officers, Equipment Officer, Assistant Machine Gun Instructor, Recording Officer, Warrant Officers, Flight Serjeants, Armourers, Acetylene Welder, Blacksmiths, Carpenters, Clerks (General), Coppersmith, Cook, Drivers (MT), Electricians, Fitters (General), Fitter (Machinist), Fitter (Turner), Instrument Repairers, Motor Cyclists, Mechanics (Wireless), Sailmakers, Storemen, Vulcansier
    • Also attached: RAMC, Batmen
  • Three Flights, each consisting of:
    • Flight Commander, Flying Officers, Officer Observers, Equipment Officer, Qualified Aerial Gunners, Flight Serjeant, Serjeants, Carpenter, Coppersmith, Cooks, Drivers (MT), Electrician, Fitters (General), Fitters (Engine), Fitters (Turner), Instrument Repairer, Mechanics (Wireless), Motor Cyclists, Photographers, Riggers, Sailmaker
    • Also attached: Batmen

Technical / Engineering Trades

Maintenance, Servicing and Repair of aircraft and equipment was carried out by Technical / Engineering personnel, with work split between:

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults)
  • Scheduled maintenance work

Work was undertaken by personnel (a) on strength of the squadron and (b) on strength of an Aircraft Supply Depot / Aircraft Park.

Personnel on strength of the squadron were responsible for daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations. Work, which was carried out on the airfield, was only on aircraft and equipment that were on charge of the squadron.

Personnel on strength of an Aircraft Supply Depot / Aircraft Park were responsible for ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults) and scheduled maintenance. Work, which was carried out at the Depot / Park, was on all aircraft and equipment that were on charge of the various RFC Brigades.

Other Ground Trades

Other ground personnel carried out technical and administrative duties such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support.


No 35 Squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Ground Personnel, but a few listings can be found (eg on squadron movement orders)


1929 to 1940 (Ground Personnel)

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks operated throughout the domestic, technical and airfield sites, providing essential ground services in support of air operations.

It is understood that during the 1930’s, squadrons stationed at a particular airfield were largely autonomous and, as such, all Ground Personnel were primarily on strength of the squadron, rather than on strength of the station. This situation started to change when Station Headquarters were introduced in the late 30’s.

Technical / Engineering Trades

Maintenance and Servicing of aircraft and equipment was carried out by Technical / Engineering personnel, with work split between:

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults)
  • Scheduled maintenance work (#)

(#) Major scheduled maintenance work may have been carried out by specialist Maintenance Units

Other Ground Trades

Other ground personnel carried out squadron related technical and administrative duties such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support.


No. 35 Squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Ground Personnel, but some listings can be found (eg on squadron movement orders)


1946 to 1950 (Ground Personnel)

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks operated throughout the domestic, technical and airfield sites, providing essential ground services in support of air operations.

Engineering Trades

Maintenance and Servicing of aircraft and equipment was carried out by Technical / Engineering personnel, with work split between:

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults)
  • Scheduled maintenance work

Work was undertaken by personnel (a) on strength of the squadron and (b) on strength of the station.

Personnel on strength of the squadron were responsible for daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations (*). Work, which was carried out on the dispersals, was only on aircraft and equipment that were on charge of the squadron.

(*) The role included:
1. Routine checks such as: before flight, after flight and turn-round servicing, operational turn-round and readiness checks
2. Aircraft marshalling and towing
3. Replenishment of aircraft fuel tanks, engine oil reservoirs and assisting with role change and weapon loading
4. Routine maintenance of aircraft ground support equipment
5. Minor rectification and assisting technicians in the repair of more involved defects

Personnel on strength of the station were responsible for ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults) and scheduled maintenance. Work, which was carried out in the airfield hangars, was on all aircraft and equipment that were on charge of all the squadrons based at the station. Major scheduled maintenance was carried out by personnel from a Maintenance Unit.

When “Central Servicing” was in place (May 1947 to December 1949?) all technical and engineering work (including daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft) was carried out by personnel on strength of the station Technical Wing



Other Ground Trades

Other ground personnel carried out technical and administrative duties such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support.

Whilst personnel in these trades were primarily on strength of the station (providing services to all the squadrons that were based there), a small proportion were on strength of the squadron, undertaking squadron specific duties

No. 35 Conversion Flight

Research Notes

No. 35 Conversion Flight formed at Linton-On-Ouse in February 1942 to train crews to fly the Handley Page Halifax.

By July 1942, it had worked up to a strength of 3 Officers, 5 Airmen (aircrew trades) and 112 Airmen (Ground Trades). Four Halifax I were on charge of the squadron (L9571, L9575, L9606 and L9607) and three Halifax II (R9370, R9381 and W1006)

In August 1942, flying practice was transferred to RAF Eastmoor, due to construction work at Linton-On-Ouse. Halifax II (R9493) was taken on charge

In September 1942, the unit moved to Marston Moor and then to RAF Rufforth. Halifax W7806 was taken on charge

In October 1942, the unit moved back to Marston Moor and it was disbanded (becoming part of No. 1652 Heavy Conversion Unit) .Halifax W1234 was taken on charge.

The record books show the following instructors were posted and pupils attached to the flight. It is worth noting that the pupils shown are the Captains of aircraft and that their crews were also attached at the same time

FebruaryInstructorsEG Franklin / PS James
PupilsReed / HGB Mays / CC Spencer
MarchInstructorsEG Franklin
PupilsHGB Mays / CC Spencer / Booth / Tweddle / Pack / Stringer
AprilInstructorsEG Franklin / DSS Wilkerson
PupilsBooth / Mackenzie / Astbury / Granger / Boyle / Bonnar
MayInstructorsEG Franklin / DSS Wilkerson / AP Hollick
PupilsMacKenzie / Peveler / Newitt / Boyle / Watson / Brough / Casey / Drower
JuneInstructorsEG Franklin / AP Hollick / RT Langton (@)
PupilsMacDonald / Reeve / Maple / Dobson / Woolven / Murray / John
JulyInstructorsEG Franklin / AP Hollick / RT Langton (@)
PupilsMurray / PH Smith / John / JW Smith / Caldwell / Saunders / Howe
AugustInstructorsEG Franklin / RT Langton (@) / SD Jones / LDH Izzard (Signals) / JK Corke (Navigation) / W Walker (Gunnery) / FA Hough (Flight Engineer)
PupilsBrown / Caldwell / Saunders / Owen / Webster / Kerry / Beveridge / Thomas / O’Neill / Wilkes
SeptemberInstructorsEG Franklin (replaced by P Johnson) / RT Langton (replaced by WHN Balley) / SD Jones / LDH Izzard (replaced by A Linton) (Signals) / JK Corke (Navigation) / W Walker (Gunnery) / WGL Brown (Gunnery) / FA Hough (Flight Engineer)
PupilsWebster / Thomas / Beveridge / Herbert / Peters / Sawatzky / O’Neill / Elliott (Refresher) / Rees / RHB Gamble / Wood / Allan / Bell / NS Black
OctoberInstructorsP Johnson) / WHN Balley / A Linton (Signals) / JK Corke (Navigation) / W Walker (Gunnery) / FA Hough (Flight Engineer)
PupilsRHB Gamble / Wood / Allen / Bell / NS Black / Carver / Hatley / Fisher / Lea / Rank / Bertram / Hickson / Grubert /

Aircraft Equipment (WWII)

RESEARCH NOTES

The following provides information on the equipment used, or carried, by squadron aircraft during WWII. In some instances, the equipment continued to be used post war

Air Position Indicator

The Air Position Indicator was a device designed to maintain the continuous and automatic air plot of the aircraft. It indicated the air position of an aircraft, at any point during flight (latitude and longitude).

Air Position Indicator

Boozer

Boozer was an onboard warning device. An aerial fitted to the tail provided a warning signal when the aircraft was being tracked by German airborne or ground radar [From 1943]

Carpet

Carpet was an airborne jamming device used to jam German Wurzburg ground radar

Fishpond

Introduced in October 1943 [in conjunction with H2S], “Fishpond” was a visual display which was installed to provide early warning of enemy fighters beneath the aircraft.

The transmitter/receiver TR3191 and the Indicator Unit 182A were situated in the Wireless Operator’s station.

fishpond-in-halifax-echoes-of-war-book

Fishpond Indicator Unit in the Halifax [Source: Echoes of War]

Fishpond Unit fitted in the Lancaster

Gee

Introduced in 1942, Gee was a medium range radar navigation aid using ground transmitters (Gee Chains) and onboard cathode ray receiver.

The system, which had a range of up to 350 miles, measured the time delay between two radio signals sent from the Gee Chains to provide the navigator with a fix.

gee-equipment-national-air-force-museum-of-canada

R1355 receiver and the Indicator Unit 62A (far left).

An example of a Gee Chart

Ground Position Indicator (GPI)

H2S

H2S was an airborne scanning radar and target location aid (also known as Nav. Aid Y) which provided a visual image of the target at night and through cloud cover. It was used for the first time by the squadron by six aircraft on an operation to Hamburg on 30th January 1943

Identification Friend or Foe (IFF)

Transmission of a blip to British Radar Stations to identify that the aircraft was friendly

Loran

Loran was a long range radar device, similar to Gee

Monica

Introduced in June 1943, “Monica” was a radar device which was fitted to the tail of the aircraft to provide an audible warning over the intercom when enemy fighters were in close proximity to the aircraft (Max Range: 4 miles).

The audible warning was subsequently replaced by a visual display [Visual Monica] situated in the Wireless Operator’s station.

It was withdrawn in June 1944 when it was established that German radar could pick up its signals.

Oboe

Oboe was a ground controlled radar blind bombing system, incorporating two ground stations to track aircraft and indicate the designated bomb release point

Wireless Telegraphy

The Wireless Operator’s station was equipped with a R1155 receiver which enabled him to listen to (and log) half hourly messages sent from Group headquarters which were transmitted in Morse code via MF [over UK] or HF [over Europe].

There was also a T1154 transmitter (with Morse key) to enable him to transmit messages. At the start of the war, this was used to transmit a message regarding aircraft status after the bombing run but this procedure was stopped and the transmitter was subsequently only utilised in an emergency.

Wireless Station (National Air Force Museum of Canada)

Positioned in the Halifax (National Air Force Museum of Canada)

Positioned in the Lancaster [IWM_CH_8790]

It is worth noting that a transmitter / receiver was also positioned in the rear of the aircraft which enabled the pilot to communicate by voice with:

  • the airfield
  • other aircraft in the same group
  • other aircraft in the same command
  • “Darky” Emergency

Window

“Window” was bundles of aluminium foil designed to interfere with enemy radar systems. It was manually discharged through a chute in the floor of the aircraft

window_-_lancaster_dropping_window

"Missing Airmen" Procedure

RESEARCH NOTES

Immediate Activity

When an aircraft did not return from an operational sortie, the squadron would immediately inform Bomber Command, the Air Ministry and the RAF Records Office that the aircraft and crew were missing.

Examples of the messages sent (unrelated losses)

A telegram, along with a follow up letter from the Commanding Officer, was sent to the next of kin of each crew member, advising them that he was “missing as the result of air operations”.

The crew’s kit and personal belongings were removed from their lockers and catalogued; kit was returned to stores and personal belongings sent to the RAF Central Depository at RAF Colnbrook.

Subsequent Activity

The Air Ministry Casualty Branch [(P4 (Cas)] received documents, communiques etc from various sources which enabled it to carry out its role of investigating, monitoring and reporting on the status of missing airmen.

Sources included:

  • German propaganda broadcasts
  • German Totenliste
  • Other documents from German Authorities
  • International Red Cross listings

Example POW Listing

The Casualty Branch provided the next of kin with updated information as and when it became available

In addition, the Air Ministry issued regular listings showing the latest information regarding airmen, which were published in newspapers / magazines – more details –

Presumption of Death

If there was no information about an airmen after a period of time (usually six months after he was reported missing), the Air Ministry initiated the “presumption of death” process so that a death certificate could be issued; personal belongings could then be sent to next of kin, along with any monies due.

Post War Activity

After the war, the Casualty Branch continued to work with its Missing Research and Enquiry Service (MRES) teams to try to locate the remains of missing airmen so that they could be exhumed, identified and concentrated (reinterred) in a Commonwealth War Grave Cemetery in the country that they fell (which was Government policy at the time)

2020/09 Newsletter

Research Work

This month, I have carried out research on the following, all of whom served with the squadron:

  • RN Wolton (1917 to 1918)

September “On This Day” Series

For information on personnel and aircraft losses relating to each day, please click on the following link

– Personnel and aircraft losses –

September 1935

On 23rd September 1935, the squadron mobilised to Sudan, as part of the RAF’s commitment to policing the area during the Abyssinian Crisis

– More details –

September 1944

The following is an extract from the 35 Squadron aircraft “snag book” showing the damage to some of its aircraft after operations on 12th September 1944.

Courtesy of Sean Feast

September 1946

On 18th September 1946, the squadron (having returned from “Operation Lancaster” [Goodwill Tour of USA]) moved from RAF Graveley to RAF Stradishall

raf_stradishall_1945

RAF Stradishall circa 1945 [Source: Google Earth]

September 1961

On 11th September 1961, the squadron, which had been operating as a light bomber squadron (equipped with the Canberra B.2), was disbanded.

Wing Commander H Neubroch (Officer Commanding, 35 Squadron) recorded the following “All tasks arising before disbandment – flying, administrative, ceremonial and social were completed in full. It merely remains for me to wish our successors on No. 35 Squadron, joy and success – may all their runs be straight and true”

September 1992

On 19th September 1992, a memorial was unveiled at Blesme, France to honour the crew of Halifax W7657 which had crashed in the village on 19th September 1942, with the loss of 3 lives, including JH Marks, the Officer Commanding 35 Squadron

– More details on the loss –

September 2002

On 12th September 2002, a dedication ceremony was held in the Royal Air Force Wing at the National Memorial Arboretum (Staffordshire), where two trees had been planted (one for 35 Squadron, the other for 635 Squadron) and commemorative plaques installed.

img_0153cleaned-up

September 2018

On 29th September 2018, a memorial was unveiled in Vessem, Holland, to commemorate the loss of Lancaster ND762.

The memorial depicts the three airman that survived, along with the silhouettes of the five that lost their lives. The words “when the sun sets and darkness falls, I will remember” were recorded by Ernest Holmes’ (Shirl-E) in his POW diary, in memory of his crew

Photograph courtesy of Bart Beex

– More details on the loss –

Armstrong Whitworth FK8

This month, I have been updating the website pages relating to the Armstrong Whitworth FK8, which the squadron utilised throughout WWI to carry out its role of “providing medium and short distance aerial reconnaissance for one of the British Army Corps Commands”

As part of the update, I gathered together some photographs of squadron aircraft, including some showing force landings

Scampton Commemorative Window Appeal

I have been sent the following update regarding the Scampton Commemorative Window Appeal

The order for the window has been placed with the designer (Claire Williamson), but with lock down affecting glass supplies, Claire decided to close the glass workshop for a while; however the good news is that the workshop is now open again and the full size template has been created.

The Queen’s crown has been replaced by the King’s crown on the ‘Per Ardua Ad Astra’ RAF crest, to reflect the crest used on the Commonwealth War Graves in the churchyard.

Responding to feedback from the Historic England stained glass window advisor, the font used for the words ‘Commemorating those who served at RAF Scampton” has been changed to that used on the updated RAF Logos.

The serial number on the Lancaster bomber has been removed so that it now represents all Lancasters that flew from RAF Scampton.  

Sadly, with a new period of Covid restrictions recently imposed for the next 6 months, the window will not now be installed prior to Remembrance Day 2020 as originally planned, but will be installed as early in 2021 as restrictions allow. The window’s dedication ceremony will hopefully follow in the summer.

Fundraising is continuing and we are now 82% of the way towards our funding target.

Wing Commander (rtd) Bill Ramsey and Squadron Leader (rtd) Martin Withers DFC (who flew the last ever flight of the Avro Vulcan) have kindly signed photographs in aid of the RAF Scampton Commemorative Window Appeal.

Accompanying the signed photo is the story of that poignant final flight. The signed photo and text are perfect for creating a montage, should you wish to frame them. An example is shown below.

Scampton Church are offering both the photo and text for £25 including postage (frame not included). All proceeds go towards the RAF Scampton Commemorative Window Appeal.

We are grateful to both pilots, and Vulcan to the Sky Trust for supporting this unique historical offer.

If you are interested in purchasing the signed photo and text please e-mail rafwindow@scamptonchurch.org

Contacts

This month, I have been contacted by the following:

  • Geraldine Wood: My dad, Richard Wood, piloted Vulcans on 35 Squadron
  • Ernie Todd: I was a Nav Plotter and was on 35 Sqn, from 64-68 and came across your site by chance. I must say, it is most impressive and must occupy so much of your time. It will take me ages to finish. Somewhere, I have photos from those far-off days, I just need to find them – still to be unpacked from a big move.

2020/08 Newsletter

Research Work

This month, I have carried out research on the following, all of whom served with the squadron:

  • RS Hogg (1943 [POW])
  • D Harris (1943 to 1944)
  • F Feakins (1944 [KIA])
  • TE Bellamy (1942 to 1945)

If you would like information on a relative who served with the squadron (1916 – 1982), please get in touch and I will do my best to help

Linton-On-Ouse Memorial Room

Prompted by an enquiry regarding the status of the Memorial Room at Linton-On-Ouse, I got in touch with a number of my contacts to find out (a) whether it was open now that lock down restrictions had been eased and (b) whether a decision had been made about its future

My source at Linton advised that the Room is now permanently closed and the exhibits and artefacts are being boxed up in readiness for storage.

My source at Beningbrough Hall (which had a special connection with Linton during WWII), advised that discussions had taken place with the National Trust but no interest had been shown in taking on the collection despite pressure from local history groups. (My feeling is that the National Trust, faced with its current financial situation, would be even less likely to want to take on the collection if it was approached again now)

My source at the Historical Training Facility at Leeming advised that it had not been contacted to see if it would be interested in taking on the collection. However, with the limited space that it had available, it was unlikely that it would have been able to house the collection, although it would have been interested in artefacts etc which had links with both Linton and Leeming.

Rumours are that parts of the collection are being offered to various parties, and I am guessing that once it has been “cherry-picked”, the remainder will stay in storage boxes and will be lost in time.

I hope I am wrong, but sadly, I think that is the reality of the situation.

August “On This Day” Series

For information on personnel and aircraft losses relating to each day, please click on the following link

– Personnel and aircraft losses –

August 1936

In August 1936, the squadron’s detachment to the Sudan (during the Abyssinian Crisis) came to an end and its aircraft were flown back to Port Sudan where they were dismantled and packaged in readiness for return to the UK.

Squadron personnel embarked the HMT Somersetshire which sailed to Southampton on 14th August 1936 [arriving 29th August].

Somersetshire

HMT Somersetshire

The packaged aircraft were loaded onto SS Antilochus which sailed for Liverpool on 18th August 1936 [arriving 12th September]. They were placed in storage at RAF Sealand.

August 1939

On 26th August 1939, No. 35 Squadron moved from RAF Cottesmore to RAF Cranfield where it continued in its role as a non-mobilising training unit, tasked with training the output of the Flying Training Schools up to an operational standard. Aircraft utilised included the Fairey Battle and the Avro Anson

August 1942

On 12th August 1942, an Advance Party proceeded by rail from RAF Linton-On-Ouse to RAF Graveley and the squadron was transferred from No. 4 Group, Bomber Command to the newly formed Pathfinder Force (No. 3 Group, Bomber Command) on that day.

On 14th August, a Road Party (with service vehicles) travelled to Graveley followed by the Main Party, which proceeded by rail and air on 15th August

The Rear Party, which had been left with two unserviceable aircraft at RAF Linton-on-Ouse, travelled by rail on 17th August, thereby completing the move to RAF Graveley.

RAF Graveley (Technical Area)

The squadron flew its first operational sortie as a Pathfinder squadron on the 18th August 1942

An extract from a 35 Squadron navigation report from the first PFF operation

August 1949

On 12th August 1949, the squadron started to re-equip with the Avro Lincoln, a four-engine heavy bomber which was designed (in accordance with Specification B.14/43) to replace the wartime four-engine bombers. It was used by the squadron for training and operational purposes until February 1950

Lincoln Profile

Avro Lincoln Profile © Malcolm Barrass

August 1966

On Sunday 14th August 1966, orders were received covering the withdrawal of the medium bombers to the United Kingdom. This followed the signing of the Bangkok Agreement by Malaysia and Indonesia, ending the confrontation between these two countries.

The aircraft returned from Darwin to Tengah on 17th.

Flt. Lt JM Morgan and crew and Flt. Lt B Dorrington and crew departed by Vulcan for Cottesmore on the 23rd. After take-off, they formed up with Flt. Lt PG Franklin and crew and did a flypast over Tengah for the benefit of the news cameramen covering the withdrawal.

Tengah2 [Marham Aviation Heritage Centre FB]

Flt. Lt LDA Russell and crew left RAF Changi by Transport Command Britannia, along with half of the ground crew. Flt. Lt PG Franklin and Flt Lt AM Mitchell left by Vulcan for Cottesmore on the 27th. The remaining ground crew returned to Cottesmore on any available seats on Transport Command scheduled or chartered flights”

Canberra B.2 Model

Jon de Gray posted a photo of a model he had made of Canberra WJ642 (with No. 35 Squadron markings), which stood as gate guardian at RAF Upwood.

He added “I was at Upwood school from 1966- 1972 and a lot of my friends lived on the Camp so I would see the Canberra quite often. I’ve always been interested in aircraft and used to go to a lot of air displays with my Dad who was in the RAF during the war”.

(It is worth adding that the guard guardian was actually WH723, which was given the identity of WJ642)

No. 35 Squadron in Sudan

JWH Brown contacted me to say that his father served with No. 35 Squadron in the Sudan 1935/36 and had taken many photos in and around the camp.

I have started to add some of the photographs to the site as they provide an interesting insight into conditions etc at the time

Contact Us

This month, I was contacted by the following people:

  • Geraldine Wood: My dad Richard Wood piloted Vulcans on 35 Squadron

Please remember, the site can only be built with help from people like yourself who have an interest in the squadron

E-Mail the Editor

or contact us on Facebook

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks operated throughout the domestic, technical and airfield sites, providing essential ground services in support of air operations.

Technical / Engineering Trades

Maintenance, Servicing and Repair of aircraft and equipment was carried out by Technical / Engineering personnel, with work split between:

  • Daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations 
  • Ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults)
  • Scheduled maintenance work

Work was undertaken by personnel (a) on strength of the squadron and (b) on strength of the station.

Personnel on strength of the squadron were responsible for daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations . Work, which was carried out on the dispersals, was only on aircraft and equipment that were on charge of the squadron.

Personnel on strength of the station were responsible for ongoing maintenance work (incl. rectification of more complex faults) and scheduled maintenance. Work, which was carried out in the airfield hangars, was on all aircraft and equipment that were on charge of all the squadrons based at the station. Major scheduled maintenance was carried out by personnel from a Maintenance Unit.

[#] It is worth noting that personnel on strength of No. 9035 Servicing Echelon were attached to No 35 Squadron to assist with the daily servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment from 3rd November 1943 until 3rd March 1945

– More details on Aircraft Servicing in Bomber Command (WWII)-

Other Ground Trades

Other ground personnel carried out technical and administrative duties such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support.

Trades were grouped as follows, with Group I being the highest paid out of Groups I to V:

[Source: ABC of the RAF (published post 1941)]

[*] Trades and Groups changed throughout the war, so the listing is to demonstrate the variety of trades. It has not been possible to find a listing which identifies which were on strength of the squadron and which were on strength of the station.

Whilst personnel in these trades were primarily on strength of the station (providing services to all the squadrons that were based there), a small proportion were on strength of the squadron, undertaking squadron related Administrative Duties


Personnel on strength of (or attached to) No 35 Squadron

No. 35 Squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Ground Personnel, but some listings can be found (eg on squadron movement orders)


Photo Gallery

Fitters and Flight Mechanics on arrival at RAF Graveley (with JH Marks)

Armament Section (Date Unknown)

Airfield Incidents

The following airfield incidents occurred whilst the squadron was based at RAF Linton-On-Ouse and RAF Graveley:

Memories

The following provides memories of airman that served as Ground Personnel:

1940 to 1945 (Ground Personnel)

German POW Cards (WWII)

RESOURCES

Description

WO416 German Record Cards of British and Commonwealth Prisoners of War and some Civilian Internees, Second World War

The cards can contain:

  • Camp name
  • Camp number
  • Country of origin
  • Surname
  • First name(s)
  • Place and Date of birth
  • Father’s first name
  • Mother’s maiden name
  • Name and Address of Next of Kin
  • Religion
  • Date and Place of Capture
  • Where transferred/transported from
  • Details of escape
  • Details of death
  • Service (e.g. Army, Air, Navy, Civilian)
  • Service rank
  • Service number

Availability

The Record cards are held at the National Archives, Kew [File WO416] and are available for viewing and copying provided it is 100 years after the birth of the individual

2020/07 Newsletter

Research Work

This month, I have carried out research on the following, all of whom served with the squadron:

  • RM Mather (1943 [POW])
  • HC Pexton (1943 [Killed])
  • JL Lee (1943 [Killed])
  • BG Southwell (1959 to 1961)

If you would like information on a relative who served with the squadron (1916 – 1982), please get in touch and I will do my best to help

Remembering a Lancaster Flight

I was contacted by Norman Allum (1924 Squadron A.T.C. 1948 – 1952) who explained that he recently came across his old Air Training Corps log book which showed that whilst on an annual camp at R.A.F. Mildenhall in 1949 he was lucky enough to be a passenger on a 7 1/2 hour flight in a Lancaster.

Norman did not record the aircraft serial number or the crew names at the time, but a look through the squadron’s Record Book shows that the crew were on a Bullseye exercise. (Unfortunately, the serial number was not recorded in the Record Book either)

Over 70 years on, he remembers little about the actual trip but says:

“I vaguely recall being kitted out with flying gear. As a night flight, oxygen masks were required to be worn from take off to landing. I remember the strange smell of the mask which seemed to stay with me for the entire flight. Seated next to the wireless operator there was very little to see. I do believe I may have even slept most of the time! We were provided with sandwiches and a flask of tea or coffee for the trip and the biggest question on my mind was ‘How could I eat or drink with this mask on?’ Observing the wireless operator, he just took the mask off and proceeded to eat and drink without any problem. As for me, I was too scared to even remove the mask. I broke off pieces of the sandwich and poked them in to my mouth from under the mask. I do not remember drinking anything for the entire trip! I am proud to have been just a very small part in the history of No. 35 Squadron, on that night of the 9th August 1949”

July “On This Day” Series

– Personnel and aircraft losses relating to each day –

15th July

On 15th July 1937, the squadron took delivery of its first Vickers Wellesley which it trialled and used for training purposes until April 1938

23rd July

On 23rd July 1956, Queen Elizabeth visited RAF Marham, where the squadron was stationed

24th July

On 24th July 1956, the squadron moved from RAF Marham to RAF Upwood, where it operated as a light bomber squadron, equipped with the Canberra B.2

25th July

On 25th July 1943 a 1,000lb GP bomb exploded during the fusing operation in a Fuzing Point Shed at RAF Graveley.

The RAF Graveley Operations Record Book shows that seven station personnel were killed, A McAllan, RM Williams, JW McKenzie, W Mitchell, RW Castell, ES Mulcahy and LA Saunders.

The bomb dump was declared unsafe, with five 1,000lb fuzed bombs still lying in the area.

On 26th July 1943, armament staff from the Air Ministry, together with armament officers from HQ No. 8 (Path Finder Force) Group and RAF Station Wyton, visited the bomb  dump and rendered the fuzed bombs safe.

26th July

On 26th July 1932, the squadron started to re-equip with the Fairey Gordon, a single-engine general purpose / light bomber which it utilised for training and operational use until October 1937

RAF Scampton Commemorative Window

Just 14 DAYS LEFT to ensure you are in the draw of this ‘SPECIAL AVIATION RAFFLE’ to be drawn on 14th August by Wing Commander (rtd) Bill Ramsey – co-pilot of the last ever Vulcan flight…. In aid of RAF Scampton Commemorative Window – an aviation heritage project. 75 prizes including many aviation original collectables. Project supported by Vulcan to the Sky Trust and other agencies.

www.scamptonchurch.org/aviationraffle

Raffle First prize
Raffle second prize
Raffle third prize

….. and finally

It is my birthday today, and I thought you might like to see the cake that my partner made for me (with some assistance with the badge)

Contact Us

This month, I was contacted by the following people:

Diane Summers: My father was a navigator on 35 Squadron at RAF Upwood. Flight Lieutenant Brian George Southwell. We lived on Valient Square. We were there 1958-1961 approx. He served 20 years mostly Canberra’s and retired end 1969 at RAF Wyton. He is 88 with some amazing stories. I happily listen and loved my childhood with the RAF. He is currently at the beginning of his dementia journey but still has great recollections of his time served.

David Cook: My father proudly served in 35 squadron during 1939 – 45 in the ground crew, Gordon ‘Taffy’ Cook. Graveley and Warboys were place names he mentioned. I have some photos somewhere and he made a Lancaster model from a peace of windscreen. There wasn’t much he didn’t know about the Rolls Royce Merlin engine.

Please remember, the site can only be built with help from people like yourself who have an interest in the squadron

E-Mail the Editor

or contact us on Facebook

AGLA

RESEARCH NOTES

The following article from “THE MARKER”, written by Group Captain “Dixie” Dean (January 1950), tells the story of 35 Squadron’s custom of using the word “Agla” to wish each other luck on operations during WWII.

A former squadron pilot has confirmed its usage, but it has not been possible to find any additional information, nor any photographs showing its usage.


Agla

“First thing to do is admit that I haven’t got a clue what Agla means. For many years now I have always evaded giving a direct answer to the question by a knowing wink and an air of profound mystery but now I have to put on record that the result of a long investigation has proved that not only do I not know, but neither does anyone else! I feel that I can acknowledge this shortcoming because a recent enquiry was submitted to the Daily Telegraph information service by the Pathfinder Association and no trace of its origin was known.

Agla means a lot to the older members of 35 Squadron.  It was a fact that no crew went on operations without Agla. Agla was everywhere. Agla was the magic word for any and every crew. Agla always went. The method was simple, Agla was just chalked on the sleeve of the battle dress, or the front of the Mae West. It had to be freshly chalked for each operation and whilst the crews were hanging about waiting for crew buses, lots of pieces of chalk would be passed around, as the aircrew busily agla’d each other.

It didn’t stop there, for Agla could be seen written on the fuselage of every 35 Squadron aircraft, just under the tail plane

It all began about the time the Squadron moved to Graveley in the latter half of 1942. The Squadron was equipped with aircraft paid for out of funds collected by the ruler and citizens of Madras, and was, of course, known as The Madras Presidency Squadron. One day, the Potentate paid us an official visit, during which he is reputed to have said ” To you I say Agla,’ which means “God be with you.” Mind you. I never met anyone who actually heard him say this, but it was generally accepted as the origin.

Now, I was quite satisfied myself. It seemed to work too, certainly as far as I am concerned, but a little while ago I was browsing through a magazine which was featuring a story on witchcraft, illustrated by several old prints depicting unpleasant-minded people raising merry hell for their neighbours by devious means. One especially nasty looking character had had a particularly successful evening, judging by the varied assortment of demons surrounding him. His method was to draw a circle in the sandy soil by means of a stick, and, dividing up the circle, he proceeded to draw all sorts of strange signs and devices. I took a closer look and, prominent in the design, there it was—Agla

That is why I have written this. That is why I must find out more about Agla. I do hope somebody can clear the whole thing up. The mail will, I trust, produce a letter with the real meaning. Let’s hope it is not signed by Old Nick himself!


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Aglavilla

One airman’s memoirs (AJ Vial) states that the ramshackle hut used by the servicing flight was known as Aglavilla. It is not known if this has any connection with the use of the word Agla by the crews.

35 Squadron Reunion Photograph

A photograph in the June 1949 Marker Magazine shows a 35 Squadron reunion, where Agla is clearly remembered

2020/06 Newsletter

Research Work

I am still receiving a steady flow of enquiries from across the globe. This month, I have carried out research on the following, who served with the squadron:

  • RG Humphreys (1942 [POW])
  • DC John (1945)
  • SJH Andrew (1944 / 1945)
  • AJ Dick (1943 to 1945)
  • S Nuttall (1943 to 1945)
  • JRA Careless (1941)
  • H Breeze (1944 / 1945)
  • GD MacGregor (1945)
  • R Mather (1943 [POW])
  • JL Lee (1943 [KIA])

If you would like information on a relative who served with the squadron (1916 – 1982), please get in touch and I will do my best to help

Avro Lancaster Model

I was sent this photograph of a model of a 35 Squadron Avro Lancaster that was built by Barry Martin, who explained:

“My Father, Fl.Lt. C.W. Martin, always known as “Pincher” served in the RAF from 1922 to 1956, including a posting to 35 Squadron, first at Graveley, from where he joined the 1946 Goodwill Tour of the USA as Engineer Officer, and then to Stradishall, where I lived with him and Mother, in a Married Quarter, close to the German POW camp. Pincher was a practical man, and he nurtured my interest in aviation, engineering and modelling which has given me joy, and a career, for life. After Stradishall, a 1947 posting to Wahn in Germany, gave me the fun of launching a KielKraft glider from the top window of Schloss Berlinghoven, where we billeted with RAF families, down into the extensive grounds. Living on RAF stations with Father, gave me the chance to watch, and even sit inside Spitfires, Ansons, and the mighty Lancaster, and as a member of the Lincolnshire’s Lancaster Association, I admire the power, the style, and the history of the mighty Avro.

The flying model of TW657 I have made, as a tribute to my Father, and his journey to the USA, is relatively small, at 48” wingspan. It is powered by 4 geared electric motors and a Lithium-Polymer battery. Construction followed a published plan, and is in balsa and ply, covered with heat-shrunk polymer tissue, painted with car-spray. Ailerons, flaps, elevator, and wheels, are controlled by 2.4Ghz radio transmitter and receiver, and lightweight servos. The Lancaster is a favourite with aeromodellers, with many larger and more detailed versions flying- and dropping “bouncing bombs”! Aircraft modelling is a very active and absorbing hobby, and if you ever find yourself close to one of the model flying displays held in the UK, join in, – you will see long forgotten aircraft designs still flying, as their designers intended!

[“Pincher” (far right) with R Mathers’ Crew on the Goodwill Tour]

Operation Lancaster (Goodwill Tour USA 1946)

As well as hearing from Barry Martin about his father’s service with No. 35 Squadron, I also heard from Malcolm Ashpool, whose father also flew as Ground Crew in TW657 on the Goodwill Tour.

He very kindly sent me copies of photographs from the tour, some of which I didn’t have in my collection, along with copies of some of the programmes that his father collected during his “downtime” in the USA.

Click here for more details and photographs of the tour

Can you help to preserve Vulcan XL319 and its history?

As recent news headlines have shown, museums are struggling in these uncertain times, so they need all the help they can get to ensure their survival.

As I have previously advised, I am working with the North East Land, Air and Sea Museums to provide them with information regarding 35 Squadron’s use of Vulcan XL319, so that it can be displayed alongside the aircraft, once they have raised enough funds to purchase a shipping container to house it …. so can you help?

The museum also has a crowdfunder page if you would prefer to donate that way
XL319 Crowdfunder

June “On This Day” Series

– Personnel and aircraft losses relating to each day –

Standard Presentation (16th June 1959)

The squadron standard was presented by HRH Princess Alexandra of Kent at a drumhead service of dedication at RAF Upwood on 16th June 1959.

8 Group Path Finder Force Memorial

I was pleased to see the following update on the Path Finder Force Memorial:

“We continue our quest to raise funds to place the Pathfinder Memorial within the grounds of the National Memorial Arboretum (NMA) in commemoration of the RAF Path Finder Force. The placing of the memorial will take place on 6th July 2020.

After the cost of the Memorial Plinth and some works adding to over £12,500, we need to find a bit more. To this, we have been given the perpetuity figure of £7167.72 by the NMA which will ensure this memorial will be looked after for ever and the final figure by our stonemason of £5998.00. This £13,165.72 is the final monies to be accrued to close the funding for this project. There is cash in the fund however, we are a bit short and I’d like to propose the raising of £ 8,500 to help cover this cost and ensuring we have funds for the general upkeep of the artefacts we have on display as well as paying the annual premium for the required insurance cover we have to pay.”

Funding Link

Contact Us

Lock-down is providing us all with time to root through our boxed-up photographs, documents and ephemera …. so if you are spending some time reminiscing and you come across any 35 Squadron related material which you would be happy to share, please get in touch.

Please remember, the site can only be built with help from people like yourself who have an interest in the squadron

E-Mail the Editor

or contact us on Facebook

Victory Day Flypast

Extracts from the Squadron’s Record Book

28th May 1946

The full twelve formation aircraft were detailed for practice London Flypast. Press representatives and Public Relations Officers were carried. One aircraft was detailed to fly alongside the formation carrying Mr. Prentice, of the Gaumont-British News Film Company, Stanley Devon who represented the Press Association, although a Daily Sketch photographer, obtained some excellent photographs, one of which appears in the Daily Sketch of the 30th May. Mr. Devon took his photos from the rear turret of the-Squadron Commander’s aircraft.

6th June 1946

Twelve aircraft, led by the Squadron Commander Wing Commander AJL Craig DSO DFC flew on a final full scale rehearsal for the London Fly Past over the actual route. The timing and formation were good.

A number of high ranking officers from the Air Ministry were at the saluting base and they telephoned the Air Officer Commanding in Chief, Bomber Command to say that this squadron’s formation was the best and most impressive they had ever seen.

After the flypast, the formation flew over Headquarters, Bomber Command. This also drew the compliments of the Air Officer Commanding in Chief and the senior Air Staff Officer, Bomber Command.

The operation was also recorded on the BBC Home News. An excellent photograph of the squadron over Trafalgar Square was later published in the Evening News and Evening Standard.

8th June 1946

A large number of visitors and most of the station personnel who had not proceeded on their Victory Weekend, gave the squadron and enthusiastic send off as they became airborne for the Victory Day Flypast.

Each aircraft carried a press representative and these twelve men later gave very good “cover” of the squadron’s effort in the national press.

The weather and formation was good until reaching Fairlop (just NE of London). From there until the squadron was almost back at base the weather was low cloud and continuous heavy rain; the formation therefore suffered, but in spite of the conditions, put up a good show and were exactly on time to the nearest second. The precise timing had not been achieved before during any of the practices. Because of the weather conditions, little could be seen of the celebrations below, but Trafalgar Square and the Mall were very colourful and crowded.

Captains and Aircraft

Photo Gallery

Flypasts over Holland


Extracts from the Squadron’s Record Book


18th April 1946

On 18th April, it was announced that the squadron had been selected to fly a formation of 7 aircraft over various towns in Holland on April 29th in celebration of the first anniversary of the food dropping operation (Operation Manna) carried out by Bomber Command and USAAF in 1945.

The seventh aircraft in formation is to break away after flying over Queen Wilhelmina’s Palace at Soestdijk and drop a bouquet of red, white and blue and orange flowers on Soesterberg Airfield, together with a letter to Her Majesty from the Chief of Air Staff.

29th April 1946

The weather today was just about as bad as it could be for the proposed formation flying to Holland.

The Air Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Bomber Command who was to have flown in the leading aircraft of the formation, did not therefore arrive and under almost hazardous conditions, only one aircraft took off for Holland at 11.30 hours. The aircraft was captained by Squadron Leader Harris and the passengers included the Station Commander, Group Captain Collard, Mr Winant (BBC Correspondent) and Mr Van Eyke (London Reporter for a Dutch newspaper).

A broadcast was made from the aircraft to receiving devices in Holland, and the container released on time at 13.00 hours. A static line from the aircraft to the parachute of the container failed to open it. Weather conditions prevented the aircraft from returning to this country; it therefore landed at Schiphol Aerodrome near Amsterdam.

The crew was subsequently asked to give a recorded interview about the operation because the Dutch Broadcasting Authorities failed to properly record the broadcast from the air.

The whole operation seems to have been doomed to failure from the start by continuing list of unavoidable mishaps.

4th May 1946

On 4th May, twelve aircraft left in formation to give a demonstration of formation flying over Dutch towns and cities on this day of celebrations in Holland. This day is set aside by the Dutch as their official day of Liberation.

The cities were crowded with processions and the whole country looked most happy with the fields of tulips in full bloom.

The trip was most successful and compensated for the disappointment felt when the formation could not fly on 29th April. Messages of congratulations have been received from Holland and some good photographs of the formation were taken from the roof of the British Embassy in the Hague

Photographs courtesy of Michael Bullen

2020/05 Newsletter

Research Work

With the world in lock-down, I am receiving a steady flow of enquiries from across the globe. This month, I have carried out research on the following, who served with the squadron:

  • P Johnston (1941 and 1943 [Killed])
  • D Wrampling (1942 [POW])
  • MH McVey (1944 / 1945 [POW])
  • CDE Seaton (1944 / 1945)
  • HN Bradbrooke (1918 / 1919)
  • C Rowland (Chief Technician, RAF Akrotiri)
  • LB Lawson (1944 / 1945)
  • F Hay (1942 / 1943 [Killed]
  • NF Williams (1943)
  • RG Humphreys (1942 [POW})

If you would like information on a relative who served with the squadron (1916 – 1982), please get in touch and I will do my best to help

Handley Page Halifax

I was sent this photograph of a Halifax that was built from perspex by Ron Gayner (Squadron Photographer). His son (Dick), who sent it in, explained:

“Dad loved aircraft from an early age and WWII gave him the chance to work with and on them. As a lad he used to scratch build models of various types from wood and wire and then paint them up. I remember some of them, but sadly little hands didn’t do them any good! However, being on airfields during the war, a new material became available to him, Perspex. The ray domes didn’t take well to be crash landed! In his ‘down time’ he built a number of models, including this Halifax. I’ve always been impressed by his skill and always will be. Sadly, I still have some of the parts of a Lancaster that never got finished, but as a token, he did make a pair of Perspex mustard spoons for his sweetheart, later his wife, my mother”.

Can you help to preserve Vulcan XL319 and its history?

I am currently working with the North East Land, Air and Sea Museums to provide them with information regarding 35 Squadron’s use of Vulcan XL319, so that it can be displayed alongside the aircraft.

Before this can happen, the museum needs to raise funds to purchase a shipping container to house it …. so can you help?

Mine arrived in the post this week

The museum also has a crowdfunder page if you would prefer to donate that way
XL319 Crowdfunder

May “On This Day” Series

– Personnel and aircraft losses relating to each day –

ON THIS DAY (14/05)

Nearly 40 people were present for the unveiling of a No. 35 Squadron memorial stone in the Ribbon of Remembrance at the International Bomber Command Centre, Lincoln on 14th May 2019.

The stone is dedicated to all who served with No. 35 Squadron (1916 – 1982) and to the memory of those that lost their life whilst doing so.

Ken Watson (former OC No. 35 Squadron) lays a wreath at the spire

– Read More –

Squadron Memories

Lock-down is providing us all with time to root through our boxed-up photographs, documents and ephemera …. so if you are spending some time reminiscing and you come across any 35 Squadron related material which you would be happy to share, please get in touch.

Contact Us

The site can only be built with help from people like yourself who have an interest in the squadron

If you have any squadron related photographs or documents that could be included in the archive and/or published on the website, or if you have any corrections, comments or information, we would love to hear from you

E-Mail the Editor

or contact us on Facebook

Halifax DT488 (20/12/1942)

Halifax DT488 was one of nine No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Duisburg on the night of the 20th / 21st December 1942.

Its seven-man crew comprised:

  • Ronald Edward Wilkes (Pilot)
  • Terence Gordon O’Shaughnessy (Navigator)
  • Ronald Wheatley (Air Bomber)
  • Frederick Hay (Wireless Operator)
  • Frank Walter Vincent (Air Gunner)
  • Michael Albert Edward Bradford (Air Gunner)
  • Thomas Laurie Brown (Flight Engineer)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Before the aircraft could carry out an attack, it was hit by heavy ‘flak’ in the port inner and starboard outer engines; the D.R. Compass and various electrical leads were severed and the aircraft, flying on only two engines, began to lose height. This occurred when the aircraft was flying at 18,000 feet. The bombload of 8 x 1,000lb and 2 x 500lb G.P. bombs were immediately jettisoned and despite the adverse circumstances, a photograph was at the same time successfully attempted. After further jettisoning of flares and ammunition etc, it was found possible to maintain height at 6,300 feet. At 20.31 hours, the aircraft was sighted and chased by a Ju88, which made three attacks but fired only one burst. Our aircraft was then flying at a reduced speed of only 90 knots, but during the engagement, which lasted four minutes, the Rear Gunner managed to get three bursts and saw strikes in the nose of the enemy aircraft, which finally dived steeply away and was not seen again During both incidents, the entire crew remained very calm and were extremely efficient in jettisoning equipment and combating adversity, the Flight Engineer being outstanding. The Captain finally landed his damaged aircraft skilfully at Martlesham Heath”

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 (Movement Card) does not show any information regarding the incident, although the aircraft was not used operationally again until February 1943

AM Form 1180

There is no AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) for this incident; as such, there are no further details available

2020/04 Newsletter

Research Work

This month, I have carried out research on the following, who served with the squadron:

  • GF Collier (1943)
  • JR MacNeil (1959 to 1960)
  • WN Collins (1941)
  • AR Emery (1918)
  • HA Williams (1941)
  • E Garner (1945)

…. and what a lovely response I got from one grateful recipient “Oh Pete. Thank you so much for this. I can’t tell you how much it means to me and my brother. I am 72 and my brother is 77 so we are getting along in years and to be able to see this about our father is just so wonderful and we are so very grateful for your time. Thank you, thank you, thank you”

If you would like information on a relative who served with the squadron (1916 – 1982), please get in touch and I will do my best to help

Always Remembered

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DJ Milne

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of Jim Milne this month. He was a Nav. Plotter on 35 Squadron for nine continuous years and was a great supporter of the Cyprus Years group. He attended every reunion and was a much loved and respected member of the group.

Below are extracts taken from the tributes that have been sent by some of those who knew him:

  • “His humour and open friendship was much appreciated. A lovely man and a good colleague”.
  • “My enduring memory is of Jim’s smile, he never seemed to be without it. So thanks Jim for keeping us all cheerful.”
  • “He would spend time and effort to help. The (sometimes) bluff exterior hid a warm and generous heart!”.
  • New to the Squadron he “Gave me good advice, particularly how to keep pilots in order!”.
  • “He was always the professional with a great sense of humour, an optimist and a doer, a loyal friend and a true gentleman. We will all much miss that smiling face.”
  • “…..is an original Vulcan 35 Squadron Plotter from the first days at Coningsby in 1962, then Cottesmore and finally Akrotiri, nine years of continuous service with the Squadron.”
  • “.. he was an amiable and thoroughly likeable character, as well as being a true professional. I learned much from him……….”
  • “A truly lovely man and professional aviator has gone off task. We will miss him greatly. He never failed to have a cheery word, no matter what the circumstances.”
  • “How brave and positive he was, accepting his lot and making the most of the time he had left, so so brave and thoroughly to be admired”.
  • “We will remember him for his ready wit, raucous laugh and the good humour he brought to every occasion.”
  • “…..he was such a lovely man.”
  • “Such a modest and lovely gentleman.”
  • “Jim was one of the stalwarts of the squadron and always had time, as I remember well, to provide advice to the less experienced amongst us. I too recall that he always seemed to have a smile and will remember him as a true gentleman. He will be greatly missed by us all.
  • “…a perfect gentleman.”
  • “….he was always very charming and friendly. A sad loss to us all.”
  • “Jim was such a loyal supporter of the group and came to every reunion. At last year’s reunion he came to say his goodbye and thanks, said how much he had enjoyed seeing everyone again and what a good reunion it had been. He said “I won’t come to any more, I want you all to remember me as I am now and not the person I will become.” He shook Roger’s hand, gave me a huge hug and said “Goodbye”. We watched him cross the car park to his car and drive away

Jim’s funeral will be held on Monday 11th May at 12.30 and we ask that you stand at that time, together but apart, with his family in your thoughts, to remember our dear friend Jim.

Mo and Roger Frampton
PER ARDUA AD ASTRA

Jim, with the Cyprus Years Group (2019 Reunion)

Article from the Dundee Courier (February 2020)

Perth WWII hero celebrates 99th birthday by receiving highest award from French military

A Second World War hero celebrated his 99th birthday last week by being awarded the highest military award issued by the French government.

Former Flight Lieutenant Ernie Holmes, a resident of the Perth’s Kincarrathie House care home, celebrated his milestone birthday on January 29 by receiving membership as a Chevalier of the Légion d’Honneur.

Ernie was a Lancaster bomber pilot and flew many missions over occupied France.

Last week, he received a letter signed by the French Ambassador which confirmed the highest French order of merit for military and civil achievements had been conferred.

Ernie was invited to the Netherlands 15 months ago to unveil a memorial to the crew of his plane where it was shot down in South Holland in May 1943, with the loss of five members of the eight-man crew.

Mr Holmes, who is one of the last surviving Lancaster Bombers, made an emotional trip overseas to meet those who helped keep him safe when his plane was gunned down.

He had been on his way home after a night-time bombing raid in Germany when his aircraft came under attack.

The Lancaster crashed over the Netherlands but Mr Holmes parachuted to safety and was taken in by farmer Fons van der Heijden, a member of the Dutch resistance.

Just days before the region was liberated, Fons, who had harboured many servicemen and with whom Ernie shared a birthday, was taken out of church by Nazis and shot.

Speaking in 2018, Mr Holmes said: “These were good people who risked everything, to keep me safe. There is no greater love, than he who will give himself for another.”

Ernie’s son David said: “He received a letter signed by French Ambassador Catherine Colonna which recognises Ernie’s military engagement and steadfast involvement in the Liberation of France during the Second World War.”

Postscript: Ernie served with No. 35 Squadron from September 1943 to May 1944.
– More details on the loss of his aircraft –

April “On This Day” Series

– Personnel and aircraft losses relating to each day –

ON THIS DAY (01/04)

On 1st April 1938, No. 35 Squadron received its first Fairey Battle (K7695), a dual control aircraft. The Fairey Battle MKI was a single-engine light bomber, powered by Merlin I, II or III engines, which was used by the squadron for training purposes from April 1938 to April 1940

Fairey Battle Profile A

Fairey Battle Profile © Malcolm Barrass

ON THIS DAY (05/04)

On 5th April 1917, the squadron moved to its first front-line aerodrome at Savy, where it started to operate in its role as a Corps squadron, providing medium and short distance aerial reconnaissance for the Cavalry Corps.

The role included:

  • Location of Hostile Batteries
  • Observation of Artillery Fire
  • Contact Patrol Work
  • Close Reconnaissance and Photography
  • Offensive action against vulnerable points in the Army reconnaissance area

Savy Aerodrome

ON THIS DAY (20/04)

On 20th April 1938, the squadron moved from Worthy Down to RAF Cottesmore, where it remained until 26th August 1939 (when it moved to RAF Cranfield)

ON THIS DAY (27/04)

On 27th April 1942, eleven aircraft and crews, lead by Wing Commander J.H. Marks took off from Kinloss at approx. 20.20 hours to make a low level attack on the Battleship ‘Tirpitz’. The crews found difficulty in sighting the target owing to an effective smoke screen being laid, but the outcrop of rock which was known to be sheltering the “Tirpitz” was definitely seen by several of the crews. Two of the aircraft (Halifax W1020 and Halifax W1048) failed to return.

Tirpitz 27.04.1942 [Quarterly Review]

Smoke Screen over the Tirpitz (27th April 1942)

ON THIS DAY (28/04)

On 28th April 1954, the squadron started to re-equip with the Canberra B2, which it utilised for training and operational purposes until it was disbanded in September 1961

A 35 Squadron Canberra over Malta [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]

Squadron Memories

Social distancing and self isolation is providing us all with time to root through our boxed-up photographs, documents and ephemera …. so if you are spending some time reminiscing and you come across any 35 Squadron related material which you would be happy to share, please get in touch.

This month I heard from the following:

  • Ron Gilchrist, who said “I served on the Squadron from 1978 to 1980. I was the Sgt Pers Admin working alongside the late Wing Commander Roger Sweatman, and then the late Wing Commander Ian Junor. The Adjutant in that time was Flt Lt Geoff Lidbetter. On my posting to Pitreavie Castle to become PA to Air Vice Marshal Bairsto, Wg Cdr Junor honoured me with a 7th seat trip on a Lone Ranger to Goose and Offutt (8th to 21st February 1980). A trip of dreams. The crew, who were superb to me were, Scott-Skinner, Pat Chapman, Geoff Lidbetter and Al Collins. (Al Copplestone was Crew Chief)”

Contact Us

The site can only be built with help from people like yourself who have an interest in the squadron

If you have any squadron related photographs or documents that could be included in the archive and/or published on the website, or if you have any corrections, comments or information, we would love to hear from you

E-Mail the Editor

or contact us on Facebook

Bombing Competitions

RESEARCH NOTES

Bombing and Navigation Competitions (including electronics) were held annually, with selected crew(s) representing the squadron in competitions organised at Station and/or Group level.

Numerous trophies (*), were presented, including:

  • Bristol Siddeley Trophy
  • Medium Bomber Efficiency Trophy
  • Sir Phillip Sassoon Trophy
  • Laurence Minot Trophy
  • Blue Steel (inter air force) Trophy
  • Electronics Trophy

(*) See “Additional Information” for trophy details below)

In addition, crew(s) were selected to represent the Group in competitions held in the USA (such as Giant Voice).

The following provides information on some of the trophies that were won by the squadron in the post war era

1965

No. 1 Group Medium Bomber Competition

The squadron won the Bristol Siddeley Trophy (Bombing) and the Racal Trophy (ECM / Communications)

No 1 Group Medium Bomber Competition 1965

1967

Station Bombing, Navigation and Communication Competition (February 1967)

Between the 20th and 23rd February 1967 (inclusive), the Station held an inter-squadron Bombing, Navigation and Communications Competition as part of the work up for the forthcoming Bomber Command Competition. The four crews from 35 Squadron entered in the Bombing Competition were Flt Lt B. Dorrington, Flt Lt R.D. Downs, Flt Lt R.B.Gilvary and Flt Lt N.B. Baldwin. The two crews entered in the Navigation/Communications Competition were Wg Cdr D.A. Arnott and Sqn Ldr H.H. Skinner. The Squadron won the Bombing Competition and were ‘runners-up’ overall.

Station Bombing Trophy
Wg. Cdr. Arnott collects the Trophy (February 1967)

1972

The NEAF Bomber Wing, Bombing and Navigation Trophy
Sqn Leader Gowling receives the trophy from Station Commander DB Craig (July 1972)

1973

Strike Command Bombing and Navigation Competition

In May 1973, Flight Lieutenant Julian Flood and his crew flew their two sorties in the STC Bombing and Navigation Competition to such good effect that they carried off the Blue Steel Trophy, awarded to the Air Force with the best overall crews, the Electronics Trophy, for the best individual crew in navigation, and the Sir Phillip Sassoon Trophy for the best squadron in navigation

J Flood, Crew Chief Hales, R Morris, R Lane, A Morgan, R Hardisty and M Cook (foreground) with the Blue Steel Trophy (NEAF) 1973
[Courtesy of Ron Morris]

Trophies won by the IX/35 Squadron (NEAF) during the Strike Command Bombing and Navigation Competition (May 1973) including Blue Steel, Electronics and Sassoon Trophies, on display at RAF Akrotiri
[Courtesy of Ron Morris]

1975

Medium Bomber Efficiency Trophy

“The Bristol Siddeley Trophy is awarded to the Medium Bomber Squadron with No 1 Group which has achieved the best simulated bombing results on nominated flying exercises during the year. The 1975 Trophy was awarded to No 35 Squadron after the final exercises in December had been flown. The squadron’s bombing average was 79.48%, nearly 6% clear of the nearest other squadron”

Medium Bomber Efficiency Trophy for 1975 being presented on 24th March 1976 being presented to Tony Atkinson
[Courtesy of Tony Atkinson]

Wing Commander Atkinson and WO Gough with the Medium Bomber Squadron Efficiency Trophy [which had been awarded for 1975 activities] alongside the Scampton Gate Guardian (Photo taken after its presentation on 24th March 1976) [Courtesy of Tony Atkinson]

Bristol Siddeley Trophy

1976

Bristol Siddeley Trophy

1976 Bristol Siddeley Trophy being presented to Tony Atkinson [MAHC IMG_4229]

Giant Voice

Bennett Crew (Giant Voice Best Vulcan Crew) 1976 [MAHC IMG_4227]

1977

Bristol Siddeley Trophy

Bennett Crew with the Bristol Siddeley Trophy 1977 [MAHC IMG_4232]

Bristol Siddeley Trophy

From 1961 to 1952, the Bristol Siddeley Trophy was awarded to the squadron with the best bombing results in the No.1 Group Combat Efficiency Competition. In 1965 it was reallocated and awarded to the squadron which received the best bombing results throughout the year during No.1 Group exercises. The navigation equivalent was the General Precision System Trophy

[Courtesy of Derek Parks]

Medium Bomber Efficiency Trophy

The Medium Bomber Efficiency Trophy was awarded annually to the Vulcan Bomber Squadron which had shown the best results in all aspects of its task during the previous year

Laurence Minot Trophy

Until 1953 the Laurence Minot Trophy was awarded for visual bombing, but it was allocated for radar bombing in 1955. In 1957 it became the premier trophy in the Bombing and Navigation Competition, and since that date was awarded to the Bomber (later Strike) Command squadron with the best overall results in bombing and navigation combined.

Squadron Cloth Badges

Squadron Cloth Badges / Patches were attached to the breast or shoulders of overalls worn by Aircrew, Crew Chiefs and Ground Personnel.

The following designs are known to have been in use:

The “Arabic” 35 badge was believed to have been used on Lone Rangers to the Middle East, possibly between 1973 and 1979 (more research required)

Others

Other badges / patches were used for specific events, such as the Giant Voice Bombing Competitions.

1940 Personnel (Pre-Disbandment)

Squadron Command

Commanding OfficerWing Commander WNM Hurley

Strength

  • Air Crew
    • Commissioned Officers
    • Non Commissioned Air Crew
  • Ground Crew
    • Commissioned Officers
    • Non Commissioned Other Ranks

The following are known to have been on strength of (or attached to) the squadron prior to its disbandment in 1940:

Commissioned Officer (Air Crew)

  • Robert Bramston Barker
  • William Michael Mary Hurley
  • James Paine

Non Commissioned Air Crew

  • Alphonse Roger Hermels
  • John Drummond Stein
  • [-] Wallace

Note: Very little information is recorded in the Record Book relating to personnel on strength of the squadron during this period

Ground Personnel

The squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Commissioned Officers or Non Commissioned Other Ranks that were on strength of the squadron during the year who carried out:

  • Daily servicing, ongoing maintenance and scheduled servicing of squadron aircraft and equipment
  • Other squadron related technical and administrative duties (such as Logistics, Air Operations Support, Intelligence, Administration and Personnel / Medical support)

More information can be found on the following page

– Ground Personnel 1929 to 1940 –

Personnel Losses

Remembering those that lost their life whilst serving with the squadron prior to disbandment in 1940:

  1. Alphonse Roger Hermels L8845 12/03/1940
  2. John Drummond Stein P6918 06/04/1940

2020/03 Newsletter

35 SQUADRON RESEARCH WORK

The focus this month has been on researching personnel that were on strength of the squadron during the inter-war years (1929 – 1939)

In addition, I have carried out research on the following who served with the squadron:

  • DA Arnott (Officer Commanding 1965 to 1967)
  • M Massy (1944)
  • GP Gardiner (1942)
  • M Cohen (1941 / 1942)
  • RT Morris (1942)
  • L Thorpe (1941 to ?)

If you would like information on a relative who served with the squadron (1916 – 1982), please get in touch and I will do my best to help

MARCH “ON THIS DAY” SERIES

– Personnel and aircraft losses relating to each day –

ON THIS DAY (03/03)

On 3rd March 1919, No. 35 Squadron arrived at Netheravon Aerodrome (Wiltshire) having completed its World War I activities in Europe. It remained there until its disbandment on 26th June 1919.

ON THIS DAY (06/03)

An Avro Lancaster with 35 Squadron Markings

On 6th March 1944, the squadron started to re-equip with Lancaster III aircraft when Lancaster ND643 was flown from RAF Wyton to RAF Graveley by Major J Christie (“B”) Flight Commander

ON THIS DAY (10/03)

On 10th March 1941, No. 35 Squadron became operational with the Handley Page Halifax.

Seven aircraft were detailed to attack the docks and shipping canal at Le Havre, with the alternative of shipping at Boulogne.

Sadly, one aircraft was mistaken for an enemy aircraft and it was shot down by friendly fire over Surrrey on its return journey; four members of the crew were killed. A memorial now stands at the crash site at Merrist Wood.

ON THIS DAY (20/03)

On 20th March 1944, one of No. 35 Squadron’s flights, under the command of S/L JR Wood, moved to Downham Market to become part of the newly forming No. 635 Squadron.

Twenty eight officers and forty eight NCO aircrew travelled by air in nine Lancaster III aircraft. One hundred and two groundcrew personnel, comprised almost entirely of “B” Flight, travelled by road. In addition, a further nine squadron personnel and thirty two personnel from No. 9035 Servicing Echelon proceeded on posting to No. 9635 Servicing Echelon

In the early 1980s, a number of ground crew who had left No. 35 Squadron decided to try to track down their colleagues who had remained with the squadron at the time …. .and the 35 / 635 Squadron Association was formed

HIDDEN TREASURES?

Social distancing and self isolation is providing us all with time to root through our boxed-up photographs, documents and ephemera …. so if you are spending some time reminiscing and you come across any 35 Squadron related material which you would be happy to share, please get in touch.

[STAY SAFE]

ALWAYS REMEMBERED

(Article and Photograph courtesy of Linzee Duncan)

On the night of 30th March 1942, 12 aircraft took part in a raid on the Battleship Tirpitz which was which was moored in Fættenfjord, Norway; 3 of these aircraft (captained by Bushby, Archibald and Steinhauer) failed to return.

Today (78 years on) we went to visit my grandfather’s grave and those of all the other airmen who lost their lives in the March and April attacks on Tirpitz in 1942 along with the airmen from Coastal Command and PRU who were lost on ops related to the same target.

We lit a candle at the Cross of Sacrifice for those whose bodies were never recovered from the fjords and the sea and so have no known grave

CONTACT US

The site can only be built with help from people like yourself who have an interest in the squadron

If you have any squadron related photographs or documents that could be included in the archive and/or published on the website, or if you have any corrections, comments or information, we would love to hear from you

E-Mail the Editor

or contact us on Facebook

UK to Sudan

On 23rd September 1935, the squadron’s aircraft (Fairey Gordon) were flown to RAF Sealand, Flintshire where they were dismantled and packed, ready for shipment.

All ranks were given four days embarkation leave before travelling to Liverpool where they embarked the SS Cameronia (see photograph) which sailed for Port Sudan on 4th October 1935 [arriving 17th October].

Cameronia

Having arrived in the Middle East, personnel travelled by rail to the tented camp at Ed Damer [arriving 18th October].

Ed Damer [Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]

The aircraft, which had to be reassembled at Port Sudan, were flown to Ed Damer on 26th October 1935.

Operational sorties, which included border patrols, the provision of a mail service and reconnaissance / survey work commenced on 7th November 1935.

Sudan to the UK

RESEARCH NOTES

In August 1936, the squadron’s detachment to the Sudan ended and its aircraft were flown back to Port Sudan where they were dismantled and packaged in readiness for return to the UK.

Aerial view of RAF Station Port Sudan, 1936 [RAF Museum]

Aerial view of RAF Station Port Sudan, 1936 [RAF Museum]

Squadron personnel embarked the HMT Somersetshire which sailed to Southampton on 14th August 1936 [arriving 29th August].

Somersetshire

HMT Somersetshire

The packaged aircraft were loaded onto SS Antilochus which sailed for Liverpool on 18th August 1936 [arriving 12th September]. They were placed in storage at RAF Sealand.

Antilochus1

SS Antilochus

Canberra WJ634 (January 1961)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Flight Lieutenant Porter was detailed for a trip in Canberra WJ634. While carrying out his pre-flight checks after starting up, the undercarriage collapsed. This accident was subject to a Board of Enquiry”

2020/02 Newsletter


35 Squadron Research Work

The focus this month has been on researching the squadron’s activities, aircraft and personnel during the 1950s and updating the relevant pages on the website.

In addition, I have carried out research on the following who served with the squadron:

  • WJ Mintjens (1944)
  • GH Parsons (1944 / 1945)

If you would like information on a relative who served with the squadron (1916 – 1982), please get in touch and I will do my best to help


February’s “On this Day” Series

– Personnel and aircraft losses relating to each day –

ON THIS Day (01/02)

Upwood

On 1st February 1940, the squadron moved from Cranfield / Bassingbourn to Upwood, where it remained until it was disbanded on 8th April 1940.

At the time, it was part of No. 1 Group Pool, which was tasked with:

  • providing the Advanced Air Striking Force [AASF] with a reserve or pool from which replacements could be drawn
  • training the output of the Flying Training Schools up to an operational standard

ON THIS DAY (02/02)

On 2nd February 1967, AM Mitchell and his crew (Jarron, Garrett, Messenger, Barnes) featured in a documentary on the ATV programme “Today”; It is understood that filming was carried out at RAF Cottesmore in May 1966,

The film is possibly stored in an archive somewhere, but I have not had the opportunity to track it down

ON THIS DAY (04/02)

On 4th February 1918, the squadron took delivery of the first of six Bristol F.2 aircraft, providing it with long range reconnaissance capability.

These supplemented the squadron’s Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 aircraft, which were utilised for medium and short distance aerial reconnaissance

ON THIS DAY (04/02)

Lancaster ME334 was one of fourteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Bonn on the night of 4th / 5th February 1945; sadly, it did not return and all the crew were lost. On board, was CA Butler (Flight Engineer), who was my partner’s grandfather.

It was whilst researching him that I caught the “research bug” and my interest in No. 35 Squadron began.

ON THIS DAY (10/02)

On 10th February 1949, the squadron moved from RAF Stradishall to RAF Mildenhall (Suffolk) where it remained until is was disbanded on 23rd February 1950

ON THIS DAY (19/02)

On 19th February 1982, Air Marshal Sir David Craig, VCAS, visited Scampton in order to fly the Squadron’s last full Basic Training Requirement (BTR) sortie.

The crew (in XL446) were:

  •  Flt Lt Le Brun
  • AM Sir David Craig
  • Flt Lt Cockbill
  • Flt Lt Marson
  • Flt Lt Ingram

ON THIS DAY (23/02)

On 23rd February 1950, No. 35 Squadron personnel were transferred to RAF Marham to form the nucleus of the B-29 [Washington] Training Unit (as part of the reorganisation of No. 3 Group).

ON THIS DAY (26/02)

On 26th February 1982, the squadron standard was paraded for the last time before being taken to RAF Cranwell for safe keeping. The event was attended by a number of distinguished guests, including six previous No. 35 Squadron Commanders (Craig, Fitzpatrick, Arnott, Carver, Hepburn and Atkinson) and the seven-man crew of a Halifax that had been shot down in 1941” (SD Greaves’ crew)


Stone Carving

I received this interesting photograph from Thomas Dignum with a note to say that it was carved into a wall in the flight line control hut in the detachment area at RAF Luqa in the 1970’s by an unknown technician.

It is understood that it was dug out of the wall and brought back to Scampton, but its current whereabouts is unknown.

It has probably got lost in time, but I have contacted the Heritage Centre to see if they have any ideas.


The Jews of Bomber Command

An interesting new website is being developed which provides an archive relating to the Jews who died serving in Bomber Command during WW2.

I have contacted the site authors to provide them with details about Alan Fay Birley and Maurice Cohen, both of whom lost their lives whilst serving with No. 35 Squadron. The information provided will be included in their biographies on the site.


The Jews of Bomber Command


Join us on Facebook

The site can only be built with help from people like yourself who have an interest in the squadron

If you have any squadron related photographs or documents that could be included in the archive and/or published on the website, or if you have any corrections, comments or information, we would love to hear from you

E-Mail the Editor

Canberra WH913 (07/10/1960)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “Wing Commander Neubroch, captain of Canberra WH913, whilst landing at Gutersloh after completion of a combined Marshmallow / Lone Ranger exercise on 7th October, ran off the end of the runway and engaged the safety barrier. The aircraft suffered Cat 1 damage. Conditions at the time were continuous rain, low cloud, nil wind and the runway was waterlogged”

1953 Personnel

Squadron Command

Commanding Officer:Squadron Leader FR Flynn AFC
01/09/1953: Squadron Leader RS Sanders DFC AFC

Strength

No. of Commissioned Officers (Air Crew and Ground):Varied between 22 and 31
No. of Non Commissioned Air Crew:Varied between 52 and 76
No. of Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)Not Recorded

The following are known to have been on strength of (or attached to) the squadron during 1953:

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Air Crew

  • Pilot
    • Ronald Montgomery Crawford
    • Donald Edward Dormer
    • Ernest Jackson
    • Eric Livett
    • Robert Alston Patterson
    • Frederick Norman Ramsey
    • Robert William Stafford
    • Jack Stirrup
    • [-] Whitehead
    • Richard Norman Williams
  • Navigator / Observer
    • Frank George Corduroy
    • Alan Anthony Douglass
    • Kenneth Albert Drury
    • Leslie James Fuggle
    • William Gillespie
    • Percy Hall
    • James Henry Charles  Jenkinson
    • Michael John Kennell
    • Robert Arthur Kirkland
    • Peter Alan Ottridge
    • Eric Parker
    • William Frederick John Pike
    • Michael Oscar Reed
    • Rex Southern Sanders
    • Raymond Senior
    • [-] Stracey
    • Albert Stringer
  • Signaller
    • Albert Henry Butler
    • Gerald William Clamp
    • Alfred Fishburn
    • William Samuel Jones
    • Kenneth Moore Somerset
  • Gunner
    • Ronald George Coulson
    • Richard Leslie Evans
    • Denis William Eynstone
    • John Charles Humphreys
    • David George Wiliam Hubert Jones
    • Philip Arthur Lloyd
    • Peter Frederick George Paxton
    • Vincent William Stacey
    • Edward Byron Thomas
  • Engineer
    • James Dwerryhouse
    • Joseph Edmundson
    • Maurice Charles Godfrey
    • [-] Payne
    • Stanley Arthur James Piper

Commissioned Officers (Ground) and Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)

No. 35 Squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks who provided ground support to the squadron’s air operations;. However, a few listings can be found (eg on squadron movement orders).

Personnel on strength of the squadron during the year included:

  • Engineering Personnel (undertaking daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations)
  • Other Personnel (undertaking squadron specific technical and administrative duties)

More details on roles etc can be found on the following page:

– Ground Personnel 1951 – 1961 –

1956 Personnel

Squadron Command

Commanding Officer:– Squadron Leader TA McCulloch
– 05/03/1956: Handed over to Squadron Leader RG Price DFC

Strength

No. of Commissioned Officers (Air Crew) (*)Varied between 29 and 40
No. of Non Commissioned Air CrewVaried between 2 and 3
No. of Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)Not Recorded

(*) includes USAAF / RAAF Officers)

The following are known to have been on strength of (or attached to) the squadron in 1956:

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Air Crew

  • Pilot
    • Patrick Seymour Arnsby
    • John Purslove Barker
    • John Eustace Bremner-Young
    • Eric Walter Brown
    • Richard Barry Raymond Dillon
    • Douglas John Eldridge
    • Brian Edward  Fern
    • Edwin David Finch
    • Hugh Anthony Leonard
    • Leslie Grantham Lunn
    • John Robert Mason
    • Thomas Ashton McCulloch
    • Anthony Ashley Redman
    • Geoffrey William Rushforth
    • [-] Ryan (USAAF)
    • Anthony Eric Robert Wells
    • [-] Whitehead
    • David Wright
  • Navigator / Observer
    • John Ashworth
    • William Banks
    • Michael Paul Bowker
    • John Chaloner
    • Peter George Chapman
    • James Churchill
    • Sidney John Clark
    • Colin Lilico Cockburn
    • Robert Terence Coker
    • Gordon Caswell Dennison
    • Frank Flynn
    • Charles William Gray
    • Keith Leonard Handscomb
    • [-] Heggen (RAAF)
    • Robert Keith Hepburn
    • Leslie James Hitchen
    • Kenneth Ibell
    • Deryk Raymond Jackson
    • Peter Kenyon
    • John Thomas Lynes
    • Alan Albert Mansell
    • Roderick Baird McGowan
    • Brian Milne
    • Derrick John Moore
    • George William Nettleship
    • Eric Parker
    • Leslie John Perkins
    • Raymond George Price
    • Michael Oscar Reed
    • [-] Sauer (USAAF)
    • Raymond Senior
    • Roy Reginald Sharman
    • Harold Albert Smith
    • Eric Trown
    • Roger John Turner
    • Hugh Ivor Whittle
    • John Bernard Paul Wilding
    • Charles Ernest Wilks

Commissioned Officers (Ground) and Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)

No. 35 Squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks who provided ground support to the squadron’s air operations;. However, a few listings can be found (eg on squadron movement orders).

Personnel on strength of the squadron during the year included:

  • Engineering Personnel (undertaking daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations)
  • Other Personnel (undertaking squadron specific technical and administrative duties)

More details on roles etc can be found on the following page:

– Ground Personnel 1951 – 1961 –

Remembering those that lost their life whilst serving with the squadron in 1956:

  1. Alan Albert Mansell WJ615 22/11/1956
  2. Anthony Ashley Redman WJ615 22/11/1956

1954 Personnel

Squadron Command

  • Commanding Officer:
    • Squadron Leader RS Sanders DFC AFC

Strength

No. of Commissioned Officers (Air Crew) Varied between 21 and 36
No. of Non Commissioned Air CrewVaried between 3 and 59 (*)
No. of Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)Not Recorded

(*) Higher number due to the additional trades needed for the Washington (up to March 1954)

The following are known to have been on strength of (or attached to) the squadron in 1954:

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Air Crew

  • Pilot
    • Patrick Seymour Arnsby
    • Colin Hugh Barwell
    • Douglas Stuartson Bell
    • John Eustace Bremner-Young
    • Eric Walter Brown
    • Ronald Montgomery Crawford
    • Richard Barry Raymond Dillon
    • Donald Edward Dormer
    • Ernest Jackson
    • Eric Livett
    • Bernard Thomas Millett
    • Arthur Keith Passmore
    • Robert Alston Patterson
    • Frederick Norman Ramsey
    • Geoffrey William Rushforth
    • Robert William Stafford
    • Jack Stirrup
    • Anthony Eric Robert Wells
    • [-] Whitehead
    • Richard Norman Williams
    • David Wright
  • Navigator / Observer
    • John Ashworth
    • Michael Paul Bowker
    • James Churchill
    • Frank George Corduroy
    • Alan Anthony Douglass
    • Kenneth Albert Drury
    • Leslie James Fuggle
    • William Gillespie
    • Percy Hall
    • Kenneth Ibell
    • Deryk Raymond Jackson
    • Roland Arthur Jenkins
    • James Henry Charles  Jenkinson
    • Michael John Kennell
    • Peter Kenyon
    • Robert Arthur Kirkland
    • John Thomas Lynes
    • Brian Milne
    • Derrick John Moore
    • Dennis Robert Oaten-Wareham
    • Peter Alan Ottridge
    • Eric Parker
    • Leslie John Perkins
    • William Frederick John Pike
    • Derrick David  Potter
    • Dudley Laurence Pritchard
    • Kenneth James Quinby
    • Michael Oscar Reed
    • Rex Southern Sanders
    • Raymond Senior
    • [-] Simpson
    • Jasper George Curthoys Slater
    • [-] Stracey
    • Albert Stringer
    • Peter Harold Whitbread
    • John Bernard Paul Wilding
    • Charles Ernest Wilks
  • Signaller
    •  Albert Henry Butler
    • Gerald William Clamp
    • Alfred Fishburn
    • William Samuel Jones
    • Kenneth Moore Somerset
  • Gunner
    • [-] Cosby
    • Ronald George Coulson
    • Richard Leslie Evans
    • Denis William Eynstone
    • John Charles Humphreys
    • George Johnston
    • David George Wiliam Hubert Jones
    • Philip Arthur Lloyd
    • Peter Frederick George Paxton
    • Vincent William Stacey
    • Edward Byron Thomas
  • Engineer
    • James Dwerryhouse
    • Joseph Edmundson
    • Maurice Charles Godfrey
    • Bernard Walter Noble
    • [-] Payne
    • Stanley Arthur James Piper

Commissioned Officers (Ground) and Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)

No. 35 Squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks who provided ground support to the squadron’s air operations;. However, a few listings can be found (eg on squadron movement orders).

Personnel on strength of the squadron during the year included:

  • Engineering Personnel (undertaking daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations)
  • Other Personnel (undertaking squadron specific technical and administrative duties)

More details on roles etc can be found on the following page:

– Ground Personnel 1951 – 1961 –

Remembering those that lost their life whilst serving with the squadron in 1954:

  1. Gerald William Clamp WF495 26/01/1954
  2. George Johnston WF495 26/01/1954
  3. Michael John Kennell WF495 26/01/1954
  4. Robert Arthur Kirkland WF495 26/01/1954
  5. Bernard Walter Noble WF495 26/01/1954
  6. Arthur Kenneth Passmore WF495 26/01/1954
  7. Richard Norman Williams WF495 26/01/1954

1957 Personnel

Squadron Command

Commanding Officer:Squadron Leader RG Price DFC

Strength

No. of Commissioned Officers (Air Crew) (*)Varied between 39 and 73 (**)
No. of Non Commissioned Air CrewVaried between 2 and 8
No. of Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)0 (Centralised Servicing)

(*) Includes USAAF and RAAF Officers
(**) No 18 and No 35 Squadron amalgamated in February 1957, resulting in increase in numbers

The following are known to have been on strength of (or attached to) the squadron during 1957:

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Air Crew

  • Pilot
    • Arthur Desmond Ashworth
    • John Purslove Barker
    • Edward Kingsley Gordon Bates
    • Harry Birch
    • Douglas Radley Bryan
    • John Charles Dunn
    • Douglas John Eldridge
    • Edwin David Finch
    • Kenneth McDonald  Flett
    • Edward Brian Christopher  Gwinnell
    • David John Kay
    • Alan Stewart Lee
    • Hugh Anthony Leonard
    • John Oswald Howell Lewarne
    • Leslie Grantham Lunn
    • John Robert Mason
    • Raymond Douglas  Pilcher
    • [-] Ryan (USAAF)
    • Kenneth William Simpson
    • Alan Denzil Burness Smith
    • Peter John Smith
    • Anthony Eric Robert Wells
    • [-] Whitehead
    • Patrick Tindall Whitlaw
  • Navigator / Observer
    • James Dinsdale Appleton
    • William Banks
    • John Richard Bird
    • Geoffrey Reginald Brown
    • Robert Michael Carpmael
    • Albert Arthur Casselly
    • John Chaloner
    • Peter George Chapman
    • Sidney John Clark
    • Colin Lilico Cockburn
    • Robert Terence Coker
    • John Rowell Denney
    • Gordon Caswell Dennison
    • Brian Dockar
    • John Strachan Dunwoodie
    • Geoffrey John Edwards
    • Michael Farmer
    • John Peter Flight
    • Charles William Gray
    • Keith Leonard Handscomb
    • Norman Leslie Hartland
    • [-] Heggen (RAAF)
    • Robert Keith Hepburn
    • Leslie James Hitchen
    • Erie Antony Robert Humpston
    • John Arthur Hyde
    • Kenneth Ibell
    • Deryk Raymond Jackson
    • Douglas Gordon Kaye
    • Peter Kenyon
    • [-] Kirk
    • Bryan John Leggett
    • Brian Milne
    • Derrick John Moore
    • George William Nettleship
    • Ronald Frank Norman
    • Anthony Ernest Page
    • Eric Parker
    • Norman Arthur Parker
    • James Frederick Parkes
    • Leslie John Perkins
    • Michael Pinder Phibbs
    • Raymond George Price
    • Michael Oscar Reed
    • [-] Sauer (USAAF)
    • Raymond Senior
    • Herbert Sidlow
    • David George Stannard
    • Richard Joseph Stevenson
    • Eric Trown
    • Roger John Turner
    • [-] Walder
    • George Brian Walker
    • Trevor Wall
    • Alexander Charles Wedderburn
    • Kenneth John White
    • Hugh Ivor Whittle
    • Gerald Kinsey Woolmington
    • George Garnett Worrall

Commissioned Officers (Ground) and Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)

No. 35 Squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks who provided ground support to the squadron’s air operations;. However, a few listings can be found (eg on squadron movement orders).

As all engineering work was carried out by personnel on strength of the station, the only personnel on strength of the squadron during the year were:

  • Personnel (undertaking squadron specific technical and administrative duties)

More details on roles etc can be found on the following page:

– Ground Personnel 1951 – 1961 –

1958 Personnel

Squadron Command

Commanding Officer:– Squadron Leader RG Price DFC
– 03/02/1958: Handed over to Wing Commander G Newberry

Strength

No. of Commissioned Officers (Air Crew) Varied between 59 and 60
No. of Non Commissioned Air CrewVaried between 6 and 8
No. of Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)0 (Centralised Servicing)

The following are known to have been on strength of (or attached to) the squadron during 1958:

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Air Crew

  • Pilot
    • Arthur Desmond Ashworth
    • John Purslove Barker
    • Edward Kingsley Gordon Bates
    • Harry Birch
    • Douglas Radley Bryan
    • Peter Backhouse Curtin
    • John Charles Dunn
    • David Peter Dwyer
    • Trevor James Edward Emanuel
    • Kenneth McDonald  Flett
    • Edward Brian Christopher  Gwinnell
    • David John Kay
    • William John Kirby
    • Alan Stewart Lee
    • Hugh Anthony Leonard
    • John Oswald Howell Lewarne
    • Leslie Grantham Lunn
    • William David Edward Martin
    • John Robert Mason
    • Raymond Douglas  Pilcher
    • Eric William Quinney
    • Brian Anthony Sherlock
    • Kenneth William Simpson
    • Alan Denzil Burness Smith
    • Peter John Smith
    • James Edward  Tootell
    • Patrick Tindall Whitlaw
  • Navigator / Observer
    • James Dinsdale Appleton
    • John Richard Bird
    • Geoffrey Reginald Brown
    • Robert Michael Carpmael
    • Albert Arthur Casselly
    • John Chaloner
    • Peter George Chapman
    • Sidney John Clark
    • Colin Lilico Cockburn
    • Gordon Cockfield
    • Robert Terence Coker
    • John Charles Dilworth
    • [-] Diprose
    • Brian Dockar
    • Raymond Arthur Dodkin
    • John Strachan Dunwoodie
    • Geoffrey John Edwards
    • Michael Farmer
    • John Peter Flight
    • Gerald David Fuller
    • William Frederick John Gibbs
    • Keith Leonard Handscomb
    • Norman Leslie Hartland
    • [-] Hemming
    • Erie Antony Robert Humpston
    • John Arthur Hyde
    • Peter Richard Jones
    • Terence Lewis Jones
    • Douglas Gordon Kaye
    • Peter Kenyon
    • Colin Ellis King
    • [-] Kirk
    • Anthony John McCreary
    • Terence Francis Moore
    • Derrick John Moore
    • Ronald Frank Norman
    • Malcolm Osbourne
    • Anthony Ernest Page
    • Edward Parker
    • Norman Arthur Parker
    • James Frederick Parkes
    • Michael Pinder Phibbs
    • Raymond George Price
    • Norman Sidney Pulley
    • John Frederick Schofield
    • Herbert Sidlow
    • David George Stannard
    • Derek Howard Stephens
    • John Nigel  Stephenson-Oliver
    • Richard Joseph Stevenson
    • Kenneth William Taylor
    • Eric Trown
    • Roger John Turner
    • [-] Walder
    • George Brian Walker
    • Trevor Wall
    • Alexander Charles Wedderburn
    • Kenneth John White
    • Gerald Kinsey Woolmington
    • George Garnett Worrall

Commissioned Officers (Ground) and Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)

No. 35 Squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks who provided ground support to the squadron’s air operations;. However, a few listings can be found (eg on squadron movement orders).

As all engineering work was carried out by personnel on strength of the station, the only personnel on strength of the squadron during the year were:

  • Personnel (undertaking squadron specific technical and administrative duties)

More details on roles etc can be found on the following page:

– Ground Personnel 1951 – 1961 –

Canberra XXXXX (08/04/1958)

The squadron’s Operations Record Book shows “On 8th April, FO Whitelaw and crew were taxying out of for take-off at Luqa when SAC Nevison who was working on a squadron aircraft noticed that FO Whitelaw’s aircraft had a leak in the port tip tank. Air Traffic Control were informed in time to prevent the aircraft from taking off. SAC Nevison is to be commended on his powers of observation and prompt action in stopping take-off “

1960 Personnel

Air Crew and Ground Personnel (February 1960)
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]

Squadron Command

Commanding Officer– Wing Commander G Newberry
– 18/07/1960: Handed over to Wing Commander H Neubroch OBE
A Flight CommanderDA Dobbie
B Flight CommanderD Carlson
C Flight CommanderD Wright
Squadron Adjutant
Navigation LeaderGibbs / JR McNeil
Bombing Leader
Flight Safety Officer

Strength

No. of Commissioned Officers (Air Crew) and Commissioned Officers (Ground)(*)Varied between 50 and 67
No. of Non Commissioned Air Crew Varied between 4 and 7
No. of Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)Varied between 80 and 95

(*) Including RAAF Officers

The following are known to have been on strength of (or attached to) the squadron during 1960:

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Air Crew

  • Pilot
    • Donald Edward Betts
    • [-] Brown
    • David Carlson
    • Peter Backhouse Curtin
    • Duncan Alexander Dobbie
    • David Peter Dwyer
    • [-] Foster
    • Colin Graham Goodman
    • Geofrey Norman Gough
    • Edward George Hudson
    • Peter Leonard Jobling
    • William John Kirby
    • [-] McCabe (RAAF)
    • Gerald Arthur Muncaster
    • Ronald Arthur Nash
    • Hans Neubroch
    • [-] Parker
    • Michael John Pilkington
    • Michael Denis Porter
    • Christopher Rex Potter
    • Stuart Robertson
    • Ian Henderson Reardon Robins
    • Brian Anthony Sherlock
    • Humphrey Morgan John Smith
    • James Edward  Tootell
    • Peter Reuben Walton
    • Patrick Tindall Whitlaw
    • David Wright
  • Navigator / Observer
    • James Eliel  Abraham
    • James Dinsdale Appleton
    • [-] Asson
    • Paul Alistair Billinge
    • [-] Black (RAAF)
    • John Gordon Brown
    • Harry Edwin Brunt
    • Francis Ian Cave
    • Peter George Chapman
    • Allan Clemitson
    • Gordon Cockfield
    • Anthony Brian Culley
    • Clive Davies
    • Michael John Dean
    • John Charles Dilworth
    • Robert John Dodd
    • Ernest Eric Dudley
    • Victor Terence Edmonds
    • Brian William Fletcher
    • Michael Winship Foxwell
    • Gerald David Fuller
    • William Frederick John Gibbs
    • Leslie Richard Hawkins
    • [-] Hemming
    • Francis Joseph Hogan
    • Peter Richard Jones
    • Terence Lewis Jones
    • Douglas Gordon Kaye
    • Colin Ellis King
    • Bryan John Leggett
    • Alan Francis Lyon
    • John Robert MacNeil (RAAF)
    • Anthony John McCreary
    • Terence Francis Moore
    • Ronald Frank Norman
    • Malcolm Osbourne
    • George William Pollard
    • Norman Sidney Pulley
    • Colin Redmonds
    • John Frederick Schofield
    • Horace George Sealey
    • Dareic Rupert Somers-Joce
    • Brian George Southwell
    • Maurice John Stancer
    • David George Stannard
    • Derek Howard Stephens
    • John Nigel  Stephenson-Oliver
    • Graham Sterne
    • Robert Ernest Styles
    • Peter Thorpe
    • Anthony Royston Tolcher
    • Lewis John Turnbull
    • [-] Walder
    • Terence William Walters
    • James Welsh
    • Michael Norman Whiteman
    • Bryn Williams
    • Peter Womphrey
    • Arthur William Kenneth Woodman
    • Gerald Kinsey Woolmington

Commissioned Officers (Ground) and Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)

No. 35 Squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks who provided ground support to the squadron’s air operations;. However, a few listings can be found (eg on squadron movement orders).

Personnel on strength of the squadron during the year included:

  • Engineering Personnel (undertaking daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations)
  • Other Personnel (undertaking squadron specific technical and administrative duties)

More details on roles etc can be found on the following page:

– Ground Personnel 1951 – 1961 –

Photo Gallery

McCABE CREW
McCabe, Black, Macneil
[From the collection of the late Air Cdre John Robert Macneil O35104 RAAF, who served on exchange as a Canberra navigator with 50 and 35 Sqns RAF in the period Jan 1959 -Sep 1961]

[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]

Squadron Sports Team (May 1960)

Back Row: Toottell, Dobbie, Osborne, Foyle, Spillman, Dumbrall, Jacobs, Brunt, Williams
Front Row: Hulse, Dwyer, Whiteman, Porter, Whitelaw, Newberry, Redmonds, Walton, Potter, Dilworth, Leggett

Each crew was classified as either Select, Combat Star, Combat or Non-Combat (Unclassified) to denote its proficiency – more details –

1961 Personnel

Air Commodore Inspection June 1961
[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]

Squadron Command

Commanding OfficerWing Commander H Neubroch OBE
A Flight CommanderDA Dobbie
B Flight CommanderD Carlson
C Flight CommanderD Wright
Squadron Adjutant
Navigation LeaderHG Sealey
Bombing LeaderBG Southwell
Flight Safety Officer

Strength

No. of Commissioned Officers (Air Crew)Varied between 46 and 53
No. of Non Commissioned Air CrewVaried between 5 and 6
No. of Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)Varied between 78 and 92

The following are known to have been on strength of (or attached to) the squadron during 1961:

Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Air Crew

  • Pilot
    • [-] Augusta (RCAF)
    • David Carlson
    • Peter Backhouse Curtin
    • Duncan Alexander Dobbie
    • Colin Graham Goodman
    • Geofrey Norman Gough
    • Edward George Hudson
    • William John Kirby
    • John Frederick Larcombe
    • [-] McCabe (RAAF)
    • Gerald Arthur Muncaster
    • Ronald Arthur Nash
    • Hans Neubroch
    • Michael John Pilkington
    • Michael Denis Porter
    • Christopher Rex Potter
    • Stuart Robertson
    • Ian Henderson Reardon Robins
    • Brian Anthony Sherlock
    • Peter Reuben Walton
    • David Wright
  • Navigator / Observer
    • Paul Alistair Billinge
    • [-] Black (RAAF)
    • John Gordon Brown
    • Harry Edwin Brunt
    • Roy Alfred Burningham
    • Francis Ian Cave
    • Peter George Chapman
    • Allan Clemitson
    • Anthony Brian Culley
    • Clive Davies
    • Michael John Dean
    • Robert John Dodd
    • Ernest Eric Dudley
    • Victor Terence Edmonds
    • Brian William Fletcher
    • Michael Winship Foxwell
    • Leslie Richard Hawkins
    • Francis Joseph Hogan
    • Alan Sidney Hutchison
    • Peter Richard Jones
    • Terence Lewis Jones
    • Bryan John Leggett
    • Alan Francis Lyon
    • Anthony John McCreary
    • Ronald Frank Norman
    • George William Pollard
    • Alan Potter
    • Horace George Sealey
    • Dareic Rupert Somers-Joce
    • Brian George Southwell
    • Maurice John Stancer
    • David George Stannard
    • Derek Howard Stephens
    • John Nigel  Stephenson-Oliver
    • Graham Sterne
    • Robert Ernest Styles
    • Peter Thorpe
    • Lewis John Turnbull
    • Terence William Walters
    • James Welsh
    • Michael Norman Whiteman
    • Walter Ian Charles Wigmore
    • Peter Womphrey

Commissioned Officers (Ground) and Non Commissioned Other Ranks (Ground)

No. 35 Squadron’s record book contains little or no information regarding Commissioned Officers and Non Commissioned Other Ranks who provided ground support to the squadron’s air operations;. However, a few listings can be found (eg on squadron movement orders).

Personnel on strength of the squadron during the year included:

  • Engineering Personnel (undertaking daily inspection, servicing and preparation of squadron aircraft, in readiness for air operations)
  • Other Personnel (undertaking squadron specific technical and administrative duties)

More details on roles etc can be found on the following page:

– Ground Personnel 1951 – 1961 –

Personnel Losses

  • CR Potter (Pilot) died in a motorcycle accident on 25th April 1961

Photo Gallery

[Courtesy of Marham Aviation Heritage Centre]

2020/01 Newsletter


35 Squadron Research Work

I have carried out (or I am in the process of carrying out) research on the following 35 Squadron related subjects:

  • The loss of Halifax HR812
  • WWI War Casualties
  • WWII Prisoners of War
  • WF Philpot (1945 / 1946)

If you would like information on a relative who served with the squadron (1916 – 1982), please get in touch and I will do my best to help


January’s “On this Day” Series

– Personnel and aircraft losses relating to each day –

ON THIS DAY (15/01)

On 15th January 1969, the first five crews (Bayliss, Dorrington, Carver, Tench and Wood) departed from RAF Cottesmore for RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus, which was where the squadron would be stationed for the next six years.

ON THIS DAY (16/01)

On 16th January 1975, the first wave of four aircraft led by Wg Cdr KI Watson and with Sqn Ldr WD MacGillivary, Flt Lt GR Agnew and Flt Lt IGF Lord as captains of the other three aircraft, departed RAF Akrotiri for RAF Scampton. KI Watson’s aircraft carried the first conjoined 35 (“Skyhook”) marking on its tailplane. The squadron would be stationed at Scampton until its disbandment in 1982

ON THIS DAY (18/01)

On 18th January 1917, the squadron mobilised to France as a Corps Squadron, capable of providing medium and short distance aerial reconnaissance for one of the British Army Corps Commands.

The convoy of trucks, lorries and motorcycles left Narborough and travelled to St. André-aux-Bois (via Portsmouth, Le Havre and Rouen) arriving on 3rd February 1917.

The squadron’s three flights of Armstrong-Whitworth FK8 (18 aircraft) were flown out from Narborough on 25th January 1917 and after a short stay at the RFC holding camp at St Omer (26th January to 3rd February) they joined the squadron personnel at St André-aux-Bois.

ON THIS DAY (19/01)

A map of the March [Courtesy of Jamie Wilkinson (*)]

On 19th January 1945, the German Authorities started to evacuate prisoners of war from the various camps, as the Red Army approached.

Over the next few weeks and months, prisoners, including those from No. 35 Squadron, were forced to march long distances in extreme wintry conditions and with minimal rations.

Some squadron personnel lost their lives prior to repatriation, including AH Porter, who was killed when allied aircraft mistakenly attacked a POW column.

It should be remembered that those that did return carried the memories of their time on the March for the rest of their lives.

(*) The map was drawn by E Wilkinson and shows the route(s) he took whilst on the March

ON THIS DAY (30/01)

On 30th January 1943, Navigational Aid Y [H2S], a ground scanning radar system, was used for the first time by squadron aircraft on an operation to Hamburg


Flamingo Magazine

I was updating the website to include the Flamingo Magazine on the “Ephemera” page and was intrigued by the name of the author “Bellepheron”on the squadron’s Pegasus Page.

A quick search showed that this was not some form of RAF slang, but a hero in Greek mythology who rode a white Pegasus.

Join us on Facebook


The site can only be built with help from people like yourself who have an interest in the squadron

If you have any squadron related photographs or documents that could be included in the archive and/or published on the website, or if you have any corrections, comments or information, we would love to hear from you

E-Mail the Editor


WWI (War Casualties)

1916

  • Boyd, Moses
  • Newman, Robert
  • Quinn, Patrick Joseph
  • Scott, ND

1917

  • Barne, Seymour
  • Bevan, John William Maurice
  • Bottomley, Edwin Rhodes
  • Cotterill, Harold Gordon Knight
  • Devenish, George Weston
  • Griffiths, Guy Arthur
  • Hyde, Cyril
  • MacKenzie, John
  • Reynell, Frederick Henry
  • Wenden, George

Notes:

1. CWGC incorrectly shows Hugh William Evans as being on strength of the squadron at the time of his death. However, he was killed in the UK (Sopwith Pup B2171 at Central Flying School)

2. CWGC incorrectly shows John Watson McCash as being on strength of the squadron at the time of his death. However, he was killed in France (No 3 Squadron Sopwith Camel B2365)


1918

  • Anthony, Hubert Frank
  • Booker, Charles Stuart
  • Bowden, Norman
  • Brown, Jonathan Martin
  • Caddick, WG
  • Clarke, John
  • Claydon, Albert Gladstone
  • Colligan, R
  • Coward, John Batman
  • Fitzgerald, Roy James
  • Gilchrist, Archibald
  • Gitsham, James
  • Gregory, John Sheridan
  • Hepburn, Reginald Victor
  • Higgs, Lloyd Alfred
  • Hooper, Alfred James
  • Kearney, Edward Marshal Sidney
  • Peacock, Robert
  • Phillips, James Ewing
  • Richardson, Ernest James
  • Saunders, Ferdinand Ward
  • Shooter, John Harold
  • Sonnenberg, Melville Charles
  • Stewart, RMH
  • Summers, John William
  • Taylor, Thomas St Clair Gifford
  • Trubridge, Roland William
  • Uren, Courtney Arthur
  • Urwin, Thomas Alexander
  • Wadsworth, Leonard
  • Warren, Albert
  • Webster, George Alexander Malcolm
  • Williams, Alfred Edmund Gerrard
  • Wilson, Humphrey Hamilton
  • Wiltshire, Thomas Bernard
  • Witt, Charles Frederick
  • Young, James Hill

Notes:

1. CWGC incorrectly shows John Reginald Nickson as being on strength of the squadron at the time of his death, However, he was killed in the UK (Flying Accident with 35 Training Squadron)


2. CWGC incorrectly shows J Milward as being on strength of the squadron at the time of his death, However, he was killed in the UK (Flying Accident with 35 Training Squadron [DH6 C7253)

(CWGC advised 10th January 2020)


1919

  • Woodward, W

Wiltshire (TB) (04/04/1918)

TB Wiltshire was killed in action on 4th April 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • 87118 WILTSHIRE, THOMAS BERNARD, Air Mechanic 2nd Class, GENTELLES COMMUNAL CEMETERY Grave 10

Note: No details regarding cause have been found

Uren (CA) (21/03/1918)

CA Uren was killed in action on 21st March 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • 43563 UREN, COURTNEY ARTHUR, Air Mechanic 2nd Class, ARRAS FLYING SERVICES MEMORIAL

Note: No details regarding cause have been found

Summers (JW) (13/11/1918)

JW Summers died of bronchial pneumonia on 13th November 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • 405128 SUMMERS, JW, Air Mechanic 3rd Class, ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN Grave S. III. AA. 5.

Stewart (RMH) (07/11/1918)

RMH Stewart died of influenza on 7th November 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • 2146 STEWART, RMH, Chief Mechanician, ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN Grave S. III. M. 5.

Peacock (R) (21/03/1918)

R Peacock died of wounds received on 21st March 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • PEACOCK, ROBERT, Air Mechanic 1st Class, ARRAS FLYING SERVICES MEMORIAL

Note: No details have been found regarding cause

Hooper (AJ) (05/12/1918)

AJ Hooper died of influenza on 5th December 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • HOOPER, ALFRED JAMES, Private 2nd Class, ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN, Grave S. III. BB. 15.

Claydon (AG) (10/11/1918)

AG Claydon died of illness (at home) on 10th November 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • CLAYDON, ALBERT GLADSTONE A, Air Mechanic 1st Class, HAVERHILL CEMETERY, Grave L. 78.

Caddick (WG) (04/11/1918)

WG Caddick died of broncho-pneumonia on 4th November 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • CADDICK WG, Air Mechanic 2nd Class, ST. SEVER CEMETERY EXTENSION, ROUEN S. Grave III. H. 20.

Anthony (HF) (26/04/1918)

HF Anthony died of wounds on 26th April 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • ANTHONY, HUBERT FRANK, Air Mechanic 2nd Class, ST. PIERRE CEMETERY, AMIENS, Grave XIII. B. 2.

Note: No details regarding the circumstances have been found and there is nothing to confirm that he was on strength of No 35 Squadron at the time of his death

Colligan (R) (23/10/1918)

R Colligan died of wounds (to back, buttocks and abdomen) on 23rd October 1918.

The Commonwealth War Graves Commission’s records show the following burial details:

  • COLLIGAN R, Air Mechanic 2nd Class, QUIETISTE MILITARY CEMETERY, LE CATEAU Grave C. 12.

Note: No details regarding the circumstances have been found and there is nothing to confirm that he was on strength of No 35 Squadron at the time of his death

2019/12 Newsletter


Thank you for your support in 2019; I wish you all the best for 2020

Review of 2019

It has been a busy year on the research front, with information being provided to relatives and friends of former 35 Squadron personnel and to various organisations and researchers.

There are nearly 1,400 pages of data on the website, which now includes summary details of all the WWII Crews.

I would like to thank all those who have shown an interest in the project, especially those that have sent photographs, documents or stories for inclusion on the site.

Obviously the most memorable event was in May this year, when the memorial stone (to remember all those that served with the squadron) was unveiled at the International Bomber Command Centre.

Once again, I would like to thank those who contributed towards the cost of the stone.


December’s “On this Day” Series

ON THIS DAY (18/12)

On 18th December 1936, the Squadron Badge was formally presented to the squadron by Air Chief Marshall Sir John M Steel at a parade at Worthy Down


Memorial Service

A memorial service was held at Great Paxton on 24th December 2019 to remember the crew of Lancaster PB366 who lost their lives on Christmas Eve 1944

– More details on the loss –

As previously reported, the local history society are currently raising funds to ensure that a permanent memorial can be placed near to the crash site in Great Paxton.

– Donations –


Join us on Facebook


The site can only be built with help from people like yourself who have an interest in the squadron
If you have any squadron related photographs or documents that could be included in the archive and/or published on the website, or if you have any corrections, comments or information, we would love to hear from you,
E-Mail the Editor

Wood (JR)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that JR Wood was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 15/09/1943 Montlucon
  2. 16/09/1943 Modane
  3. 22/09/1943 Hanover
  4. 27/09/1943 Hanover
  5. 29/09/1943 Bochum
  6. 03/10/1943 Kassel
  7. 04/10/1943 Frankfurt (Crash Landed)
  8. 22/10/1943 Kassel
  9. 17/11/1943 Mannheim
  10. 18/11/1943 Mannheim
  11. 03/12/1943 Leipzig
  12. 20/12/1943 Frankfurt
  13. 29/12/1943 Berlin
  14. 02/01/1944 Berlin (Aborted)
  15. 05/01/1944 Stettin
  16. 27/01/1944 Heligoland
  17. 28/01/1944 Forget-me-not
  18. 30/01/1944 Berlin
  19. 15/02/1944 Berlin
  20. 19/02/1944 Leipzig
  21. 20/02/1944 Stuttgart
  22. 24/02/1944 Schweinfurt
  23. 25/02/1944 Augsburg
  24. 01/03/1944 Stuttgart
  25. 18/03/1944 Frankfurt

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Joseph Richard Wood25
(Navigator)Geoffrey Rhodes Whitten1
Harold Patrick Laskoski17
Victor Robert Hobbs7
(Air Bomber)Alfred Edward Ralph Bexton7
Charles Henry Pettit1
Charles Hogg2
Derrick Ernest Coleman3
Frederick C ameron Shortts1
George Douglas Payne1
George Dennis Linacre7
Raymond George Everest1
Ronald Booth1
Thomas Scullion Brady1
(Wireless Operator)David Birkbeck Coltman17
Paul Sidney Warren7
 Harold John Rogers1
(Air Gunner)Derek Robinson Tulloch16
Douglas Edward John Stevens1
Gerald  Carrell1
Jack Smith1
Leonard Jesse North19
Paul Berkeley White3
Peter Ross Jung2
Thomas Malcolm Holder2
William Scott Minto Edmondston4
George Carpenter1
(Flight Engineer) Edmund Ernest Stocker1
Arthur George Page1
Edward Herbert Barry2
Frederick Edward Johnston15
J Hayton2
Leslie Albert Hazell1
Wilfred Arthur Jeffries3

Posting Dates

WoodJoseph RichardIn From:10 Squadron06/09/1943
Out to:635 Squadron19/03/1944

Williams (HA)

HA Williams

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that HA Williams was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 10/10/1941 Essen
  2. 12/10/1941 Nuremberg (Crash Landed)
  3. 21/10/1941 Bremen
  4. 26/10/1941 Hamburg
  5. 31/10/1941 Hamburg
  6. 07/11/1941 Berlin
  7. 09/11/1941 Hamburg
  8. 11/12/1941 Cologne
  9. 18/12/1941 Brest
  10. 30/12/1941 Brest

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Harry Aston Williams10
(2nd Pilot)Reginald John Lane5
(Possibly) Lionel Monck Mason5
(Observer) Arthur Sykes10
(WOP / AG) Leonard Stewart Thorpe10
Francis Edwin Flint5
Frank Wilson Crocker5
(Air Gunner)– Sankey1
Douglas Francis1
George Barry Pennell2
Luther Martin5
Maurice Cohen [aka Cowan]1
(Flight Engineer)– Crowther5
 Edmund Ernest Stocker4
– Palmer1

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Posting Dates

WilliamsHarry AstonIn From:10 O.T.U.23/03/1941
Out to:58 Squadron (Detached from May) 15/06/1941
In From:58 Squadron20/09/1941
Out to:

Williams (GS)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that GS Williams was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 05/08/1941 Karlsruhe
  2. 07/08/1941 Essen
  3. 12/08/1941 Berlin
  4. 14/08/1941 Magdeburg
  5. 16/08/1941 Cologne
  6. 19/08/1941 Kiel
  7. 29/08/1941 Frankfurt
  8. 31/08/1941 Cologne
  9. 02/09/1941 Berlin
  10. 07/09/1941 Berlin
  11. 10/09/1941 Turin (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Gerald Standish Williams11
(2nd Pilot)Alexander Osborne2
Ross Hardie3
Wallace Howard Trewin6
(Observer)James Oliver Hedley10
John Anthony Arnsby1
(WOP / AG)Charles Frederic Seymour Ryder8
E Kinsella1
Ernest H Jackson9
John Kenneth Young3
Ronald C Shaw1
(Air Gunner)Alexander Urquhart11
(Flight Engineer)Albert Robert Parke Mills1
John Edmond Murrell10

Posting Dates

WilliamsGerald StandishIn From:__
Out to:POW10/09/1941

Wilkes (RE)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that RE Wilkes was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 15/10/1942 Cologne
  2. 24/10/1942 Milan
  3. 06/11/1942 Gardening
  4. 08/11/1942 Gardening
  5. 09/11/1942 Hamburg
  6. 06/12/1942 Mannheim
  7. 08/12/1942 Turin
  8. 09/12/1942 Turin
  9. 11/12/1942 Turin
  10. 20/12/1942 Duisburg (Incident)
  11. 14/01/1943 Lorient
  12. 15/01/1943 Lorient
  13. 26/01/1943 Lorient
  14. 03/02/1943 Hamburg
  15. 04/02/1943 Turin
  16. 07/02/1943 Lorient
  17. 11/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  18. 13/02/1943 Lorient
  19. 18/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  20. 19/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  21. 27/03/1943 Berlin
  22. 29/03/1943 Berlin
  23. 02/04/1943 St.Nazaire
  24. 04/04/1943 Kiel
  25. 13/04/1943 Spezia
  26. 14/04/1943 Stuttgart (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Ronald Edward Wilkes26
(2nd Dickie)AJ May1
(Navigator)Dudley Peter David Archer2
(Navigator)Terence Gordon O’Shaughnessy24
(Air Bomber)Frederick Donald McColl3
Ronald Wheatley23
(Wireless Operator)Frederick Hay26
(Air Gunner)Frank Walter Vincent26
Michael Albert Edward Bradford26
(Flight Engineer)Thomas Laurie Brown26

Posting Dates

WilkesRonald EdwardIn From:35 Conversion Flight22/09/1942
Out to:War Casualty14/04/1943

Wilkerson (DSS)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that DSS Wilkerson was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 10/10/1941 Essen
  2. 12/10/1941 Nuremberg
  3. 14/10/1941 Nuremberg
  4. 20/10/1941 Wilhelmshaven
  5. 22/10/1941 Mannheim (Incident)
  6. 26/10/1941 Hamburg
  7. 31/10/1941 Hamburg
  8. 25/11/1941 Brest
  9. 30/11/1941 Hamburg
  10. 18/12/1941 Brest
  11. 30/12/1941 Brest (Incident)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot) David Scott Shearman Wilkerson11
(2nd Pilot)Douglas Rowley-Blake1
Dudley Herman Reed5
John Stanley Gearing4
Leslie John Nelmes1
(Observer)Ian Hewitt11
(WOP / AG)Arthur Roy Kilminster2
Charles Witcher2
David Lionel Perry8
Donald Edgar Rarity4
Francis Montague Davis2
John Stewart Morrison1
Stanley Frank Hazleton2
Walter Montague Gordon Wing1
(Air Gunner)– Sankey8
George Barry Pennell1
Richard Charles Rivaz2
(Flight Engineer)Donald Harrington Craig8
Frank Stewart3

Notes:

1. Having been posted from No. 58 Squadron in June 1941, he flew as 2nd Pilot (various crews) before being posted back to No 58 Squadron. He rejoined No. 35 Squadron in September 1941


2. He was posted out of the squadron in December 1941, but appears to have flown as the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on 30th May and 1st June 1942 (presumably whilst he was on strength of No. 28 Conversion Flight) with the following crew:

(Pilot) David Scott Shearman Wilkerson2
(Observer)Alfred Ernest Webster2
(WOP / AG)Norman Moffatt2
Patrick William Kenealy Crisp2
(Air Gunner)Mark Anthony Sachs2
(Flight Engineer)George Richard Bradley2


Posting Dates

WilkersonDavid Scott ShearmanIn From:58 Squadron10/06/1941
Out to:58 Squadron 05/07/1941
In From: 58 Squadron 15/09/1941
Out to: 28 Conv. Flt. 28/12/1941

Wilding (A)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that A Wilding was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 03/03/1942 Billancourt
  2. 09/03/1942 Essen
  3. 13/03/1942 Cologne
  4. 30/03/1942 Battleship
  5. 27/04/1942 Battleship
  6. 28/04/1942 Battleship (Incident)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Arthur Wilding6
(2nd Pilot) Geoffrey Norman Reeve3
Edward Charles Hibburt1
Norman Booth3
(Observer)Alfred Ernest Webster1
Richard Guy Baker2
(WOP / AG)Charles Burdon3
Harold Richard Giddens3
Richard Yates3
Walter Harold  Mennell3
(Air Gunner)– Hill1
Haakon Rivedal2
Joseph Thomas Stanworth3
(Flight Engineer)John Norman Hindle6

Posting Dates

WildingAIn From:1502 B.A.T.05/01/1942
Out to:51 Squadron04/05/1942

Whitworth (JNH)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that JNH Whitworth was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 08/03/1942 Essen

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)John Nicholas Haworth Whitworth1
(2nd Pilot)Hugh Charles Granger1
(Observer)Ronald Harry Birch1
(WOP / AG)(Possibly) John Andrew Catley1
Stanley Frank Hazleton1
(Air Gunner)– Russell1
(Flight Engineer)Robert George Gumbley1

Posting Dates

WhitworthJNHIn From:HQ 4 Group26/01/1942
Out to:RAF Scampton13/03/1942

White (LS)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that LS White was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 05/09/1943 Mannheim
  2. 15/09/1943 Montlucon
  3. 16/09/1943 Modane
  4. 22/09/1943 Hanover
  5. 23/09/1943 Mannheim
  6. 27/09/1943 Hanover
  7. 03/10/1943 Kassel
  8. 04/10/1943 Frankfurt
  9. 22/10/1943 Kassel
  10. 11/11/1943 Cannes
  11. 17/11/1943 Mannheim
  12. 18/11/1943 Mannheim
  13. 02/12/1943 Berlin
  14. 03/12/1943 Leipzig
  15. 20/12/1943 Frankfurt
  16. 23/12/1943 Berlin
  17. 29/12/1943 Berlin
  18. 02/01/1944 Berlin
  19. 05/01/1944 Stettin
  20. 20/01/1944 Berlin
  21. 21/01/1944 Magdeburg
  22. 27/01/1944 Heligoland
  23. 28/01/1944 Forget-me-not
  24. 15/02/1944 Berlin
  25. 19/02/1944 Leipzig
  26. 20/02/1944 Stuttgart
  27. 24/02/1944 Schweinfurt
  28. 25/02/1944 Augsburg
  29. 01/03/1944 Stuttgart
  30. 24/03/1944 Berlin
  31. 30/03/1944 Nuremberg
  32. 18/04/1944 Rouen
  33. 20/04/1944 Cologne
  34. 22/04/1944 Laon
  35. 24/04/1944 Karlsruhe
  36. 27/04/1944 Friedrichshafen
  37. 19/05/1944 Boulogne
  38. 22/05/1944 Dortmund
  39. 31/05/1944 Trappes
  40. 02/06/1944 Trappes
  41. 05/06/1944 Maisy
  42. 08/06/1944 Mayenne
  43. 11/06/1944 Paris
  44. 22/06/1944 Laon

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Leslie Sunley White44
(Navigator) Harry Cecil Wright38
Charles Louis Potter2
Eric Harold Bagnald1
Gordon Arthur Stocks2
Leslie Roberts1
(Air Bomber)Raymond George Everest44
(Wireless Operator)Ronald Bull44
(Air Gunner)Archibald Ernest Williams44
John Ernest Levett44
(Flight Engineer)George Smith44

Posting Dates

WhiteLeslie SunleyIn From:1652 C.U.06/08/1943
Out to:1652 C.U.14/07/1944

Royal Aircraft Factory RE8

The Royal Aircraft Factory RE8 was a single-engine tractor two-seat biplane

Royal Aircraft Factory RE8 Profile © Malcolm Barrass

Aircraft on charge of No. 35 Squadron

The following shows the serial numbers of aircraft that are known to have been on charge of the squadron, along with the period that it was on charge (where known):

Serial No.On ChargeOff Charge
A418622/03/1917
C229823/01/1919

Aircraft Losses and Incidents

  • None Recorded

Whitaker (G)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that G Whitaker was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 07/11/1941 Essen (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Gordon Whitaker1
(2nd Pilot)Richard Roye Drummond1
(Observer)Maurice Osborne Stephens1
(WOP / AG)Arthur Roy Kilminster1
Charles Witcher1
(Air Gunner)Robert Ferguson Thompson1
(Flight Engineer)Eric Rees Thomas1

Posting Dates

WhitakerGordonIn From:51 Squadron13/10/194145055
Out to:War Casualty07/11/194145055

Whetham (LM)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that LM Whetham was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 20/12/1943 Frankfurt
  2. 29/12/1943 Berlin
  3. 20/01/1944 Berlin (Incident)
  4. 27/01/1944 Heligoland
  5. 28/01/1944 Berlin
  6. 15/02/1944 Berlin
  7. 20/02/1944 Stuttgart
  8. 24/02/1944 Schweinfurt
  9. 25/02/1944 Augsburg
  10. 18/03/1944 Frankfurt
  11. 22/03/1944 Frankfurt
  12. 24/03/1944 Berlin
  13. 20/04/1944 Cologne
  14. 30/04/1944 Acheres
  15. 07/05/1944 Nantes
  16. 08/05/1944 Haine-St.Pierre
  17. 10/05/1944 Lens
  18. 19/05/1944 Boulogne
  19. 22/05/1944 Dortmund
  20. 27/05/1944 Bourg Leopold
  21. 31/05/1944 Trappes
  22. 05/06/1944 Maisy
  23. 09/06/1944 Rennes
  24. 11/06/1944 Paris
  25. 12/06/1944 Arras
  26. 23/06/1944 Coubronne
  27. 25/06/1944 Montorgueil
  28. 04/07/1944 Villeneuve St.Georges
  29. 07/07/1944 Caen
  30. 11/07/1944 Gapennes
  31. 15/07/1944 Les Landes Vielles et Neuves
  32. 16/07/1944 St.Philibert-Ferme
  33. 18/07/1944 Wesseling
  34. 20/07/1944 Wizernes
  35. 24/07/1944 Stuttgart
  36. 28/07/1944 Stuttgart
  37. 05/08/1944 Acquet
  38. 07/08/1944 Normandy
  39. 11/08/1944 Douai
  40. 12/08/1944 Russelsheim
  41. 29/08/1944 Stettin
  42. 11/09/1944 Le Havre
  43. 12/09/1944 Frankfurt
  44. 20/09/1944 Calais
  45. 05/10/1944 Saarbrucken
  46. 23/10/1944 Essen
  47. 28/10/1944 Cologne
  48. 29/10/1944 Walcheren
  49. 30/10/1944 Cologne
  50. 01/11/1944 Oberhausen
  51. 02/11/1944 Dusseldorf

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot) Leonard Mountstephen Whetham51
(Navigator)Philip Patrick  McGuinness51
(Air Bomber) Harry Denis Michell2
 Samuel Rene Green2
Charles Henry Pettit37
Edward John Trickey6
Gilbert Victor Williams3
Thomas Scullion Brady1
(Set Operator)Charles William Eyles1
Gilbert Wood2
John Duncan Crombie7
(Wireless Operator)Archibald Clarence Aston51
(Air Gunner) Ernest Kenwright44
 William James Simpson1
Alfred Harold Wood2
Arthur Henry Weller1
John Dixon Atkinson1
John Richard Hacker1
Kenneth James Rees50
Raymond Steve Courtnay1
Horace John Walker1
(Flight Engineer)Archibald Hunter McCartney1
Henry George Smith49
Ian Keith McGregor1

Target Photo (07/08/1944 Totalize)

Posting Dates

Whetham Leonard MountstephenIn From:HQ (Unit) PFF10/09/1943
Out to:N/E Sick24/11/1944

Welch (AHE)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that AHE Welch was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 05/06/1944 Longues
  2. 07/06/1944 Foret De Cerisy
  3. 08/06/1944 Fougeres
  4. 09/06/1944 Rennes
  5. 16/06/1944 Pas de Calais
  6. 02/07/1944 Oisemont/Neuville Au Bois
  7. 06/07/1944 Coquereaux
  8. 07/07/1944 Caen
  9. 10/07/1944 Nucourt
  10. 12/07/1944 Rollez
  11. 15/07/1944 Nucourt
  12. 16/07/1944 St.Philibert-Ferme
  13. 22/07/1944 L’Hey
  14. 23/07/1944 Foret-De-Croc (Daylight)
  15. 24/07/1944 Stuttgart
  16. 25/07/1944 Stuttgart
  17. 03/09/1944 Gilze Rijen
  18. 12/09/1944 Wanne-Eickel
  19. 13/09/1944 Osnabruck
  20. 20/09/1944 Calais
  21. 14/10/1944 Duisburg
  22. 15/10/1944 Wilhelmshaven
  23. 19/10/1944 Stuttgart
  24. 04/11/1944 Bochum
  25. 06/11/1944 Gelsenkirchen
  26. 27/11/1944 Neuss
  27. 29/11/1944 Dortmund
  28. 04/12/1944 Urft Dam
  29. 05/12/1944 Soest
  30. 12/12/1944 Essen
  31. 26/12/1944 St.Vith
  32. 27/12/1944 Rheydt
  33. 07/01/1945 Munich
  34. 14/01/1945 Merseburg/Leuna
  35. 16/01/1945 Magdeburg
  36. 28/01/1945 Stuttgart
  37. 01/02/1945 Mainz
  38. 02/02/1945 Wanne Eickel
  39. 07/02/1945 Goch
  40. 08/02/1945 Politz
  41. 13/02/1945 Dresden
  42. 14/02/1945 Chemnitz (2)
  43. 27/02/1945 Mainz

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Anthony Harold Ernest Welch43
(Navigator)Geoffrey Harold Vining Baker1
Leslie Frank Miller42
(Air Bomber)Frederick William Tynus Cross1
John Edward Hamblett1
Victor Hugh Horner40
Wilfred Marshall Buck1
(Set Operator)Bernard Chapman Brooker1
Charles George Mitchell1
Clayton Hugh Jack2
John Leslie Vickery17
Robert Black1
(Wireless Operator)George Frank Chance42
William John Phillips1
(Air Gunner) William James Simpson1
George Henry Parsons43
Jack Richard Floyde42
(Flight Engineer)Archibald Hunter McCartney43

Posting Dates

WelchAnthony Harold ErnestIn From:
Out to:14 O.T.U.24/03/1945

Webb (JCK)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that JCK Webb was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 18/03/1944 Frankfurt (Aborted)
  2. 22/03/1944 Frankfurt (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)John Cameron Keith Webb2
(Navigator)Edwin Gordon Fidler2
(Air Bomber)Wallace Rose2
(Wireless Operator)William Frederick Martin2
(Air Gunner)Frederick James Marriott2
William McKenna Smith2
(Flight Engineer)Kenneth Ephraim Harris2

Posting Dates

WebbJohn Cameron KeithIn From:__
Out to:War Casualty22/03/1944

Way (PH)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that PH Way was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties, prior to the cessation of hostilities in Europe:

  1. 12/03/1945 Dortmund
  2. 13/03/1945 Gelsenkirchen
  3. 15/03/1945 Bottrop
  4. 18/03/1945 Witten
  5. 21/03/1945 Bruchstrasse
  6. 03/04/1945 Nordhausen
  7. 04/04/1945 Leuna
  8. 16/04/1945 Schwandorf
  9. 30/04/1945 Valkenburg (Operation Manna)
  10. 01/05/1945 Ypenburg (Operation Manna)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Peter Hugh Way10
(Navigator)Geoffrey Harold Vining Baker10
(Air Bomber)John Edward Hamblett10
(Set Operator)Albert Roche1
Peter Coggan4
(Wireless Operator)C McKinnon9
Dennis Ernest Renvoize1
(Air Gunner) Ernest Kenwright8
CM Carter1
Eric Arthur Jones1
G Owen1
Jack Richard Floyde4
Leslie Arthur Booth3
Ronald Peters2
(Flight Engineer)Arthur Aked4
George Brodie Sharpe4
Robert Duncan Sampson1

It is known that some (or all) of these airmen continued to fly operationally with the squadron during the post war clean up, which included repatriation of POW and service personnel, Cooks Tours, testing of German radar and disposal of surplus incendiaries. However, the squadron’s record book only provides a summary of these activities and does not list the individual captains and crews that took part in these sorties.

Posting Dates

WayPeter HughIn From:HQ 93 Group14/02/1945
Out to:HQ 8 Group14/06/1945

Watson (F)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that F Watson was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 12/10/1944 Wanne-Eickel
  2. 14/10/1944 Duisburg
  3. 15/10/1944 Wilhelmshaven
  4. 02/11/1944 Dusseldorf
  5. 04/11/1944 Bochum
  6. 06/11/1944 Gelsenkirchen
  7. 27/11/1944 Freiburg
  8. 29/11/1944 Dortmund
  9. 04/12/1944 Urft Dam
  10. 05/12/1944 Soest
  11. 06/12/1944 Merseburg (Leuna)
  12. 15/12/1944 Ludwigshafen
  13. 17/12/1944 Ulm
  14. 22/12/1944 Koblenz
  15. 28/12/1944 Bonn
  16. 29/12/1944 Gelsenkirchen
  17. 02/01/1945 Ludwigshafen
  18. 05/01/1945 Hanover
  19. 06/01/1945 Hanau
  20. 07/01/1945 Munich
  21. 13/01/1945 Saarbrucken
  22. 14/01/1945 Merseburg/Leuna
  23. 16/01/1945 Zeitz
  24. 28/01/1945 Stuttgart
  25. 01/02/1945 Mainz
  26. 04/02/1945 Bonn
  27. 07/02/1945 Goch
  28. 08/02/1945 Politz
  29. 13/02/1945 Dresden
  30. 14/02/1945 Chemnitz (2)
  31. 20/02/1945 Dortmund
  32. 21/02/1945 Duisburg
  33. 23/02/1945 Essen
  34. 27/02/1945 Mainz
  35. 01/03/1945 Mannheim
  36. 05/03/1945 Chemnitz (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Fred Watson36
(Navigator)Kenneth Samuel Smith33
Raymond William Bullen3
(Air Bomber)John Lloyd George Marshall3
Stanley Owen Scott32
Victor Hugh Horner1
(Wireless Operator)Leslie George Holland33
Neil William Curtis3
(Air Gunner) Solomon Joseph Harold Andrew2
Geoffrey Arnold Perry1
Jack Lloyd Stevens3
John Richard Hacker22
Maxwell Edwin Ladyman3
Phillip James Pentelow6
Peter Noel Howdle1
Ronald Henry Rudyard Grayson1
Victor Arthur Roe33
(Flight Engineer)George Cross33
Ian Keith McGregor3

Posting Dates

WatsonFredIn From:20 O.T.U.15/09/1944
Out to:War Casualty05/03/1945

Watson (DJ)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that DJ Watson was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 21/11/1944 Wesel
  2. 29/11/1944 Dortmund
  3. 04/12/1944 Urft Dam
  4. 12/12/1944 Essen
  5. 15/12/1944 Ludwigshafen
  6. 24/12/1944 Cologne
  7. 28/12/1944 Bonn
  8. 02/01/1945 Ludwigshafen
  9. 05/01/1945 Hanover
  10. 07/01/1945 Munich
  11. 13/01/1945 Saarbrucken
  12. 14/01/1945 Merseburg/Leuna
  13. 16/01/1945 Magdeburg
  14. 01/02/1945 Mainz
  15. 02/02/1945 Wanne Eickel
  16. 04/02/1945 Bonn

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Dugald John Watson16
(Navigator)William Fredrick Roberts16
(Air Bomber)William George Ferguson15
(Wireless Operator)Noel Henry Wright16
(Air Gunner)Douglas Charles MacKay15
James Little Robb15
Raymond Terence Salvoni1
Reginald Martin Weller1
(Flight Engineer)George Mason Titchmarsh1
Thomas Edgar Moser15

Posting Dates

WatsonDugald JohnIn From:466 Squadron11/10/1944
Out to:578 Squadron06/03/1945

Warren (RV)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that RV Warren was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 10/03/1941 Le Havre (Incident)
  2. 12/03/1941 Hamburg

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Richard Vernon Warren2
(2nd Pilot) Stanley Desmond Greaves2
(Observer)Clement Watt Wilson1
Thomas Reginald Nixon1
(WOP / AG)Douglas Peter Hogg2
Ronald Leslie Somerville1
Herbert Reginald Higgins1
(Flight Engineer)Gordon Herbert Frank Ogden1
Norman Willingham1

Posting Dates

WarrenRichard VernonIn From:10 Squadron05/11/1940
Out to:405 Squadron (Detached)21/05/1941

Ware (ET)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that ET Ware was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 03/02/1943 Hamburg
  2. 04/02/1943 Turin
  3. 14/02/1943 Cologne
  4. 16/02/1943 Lorient
  5. 19/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  6. 21/02/1943 Bremen
  7. 25/02/1943 Nuremberg
  8. 22/03/1943 St.Nazaire
  9. 28/03/1943 St.Nazaire
  10. 04/04/1943 Kiel
  11. 12/05/1943 Duisburg
  12. 13/05/1943 Pilsen
  13. 23/05/1943 Dortmund
  14. 25/05/1943 Dusseldorf
  15. 29/05/1943 Wuppertal
  16. 21/06/1943 Krefeld
  17. 15/07/1943 Montbéliard
  18. 02/08/1943 Hamburg
  19. 09/08/1943 Mannheim
  20. 10/08/1943 Nuremberg (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Elliss Trevor Ware20
(Navigator) Charles Bowmer Russell13
John Richard Jones7
(Air Bomber)Gordon Davidson Hogg13
Owen Letchworth Roberts7
(Wireless Operator)Glenburne George Galvin10
H Spence7
Peter Howard Crick3
(Air Gunner)EW MacDonald3
George Waller Dickenson7
Reginald Hamblin18
William George Jackett12
(Flight Engineer)George Lionel Grimes7
Jack Fiddler13

Posting Dates

WareElliss TrevorIn From:102 Squadron28/01/1943
Out to:POW10/08/1943

Walker (JS)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that JS Walker was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties, prior to the cessation of hostilities in Europe:

  1. 15/03/1945 Bottrop
  2. 24/03/1945 Gladbeck
  3. 25/03/1945 Osnabruck
  4. 27/03/1945 Paderborn
  5. 03/04/1945 Nordhausen
  6. 05/05/1945 Ypenburg (Operation Manna)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)John Sutherland Walker6
(Navigator)John Strange East6
(Air Bomber)Horace Reginald Williams5
Joseph Frederick William Harding1
(Wireless Operator)Harry Kearsley Chamberlain6
(Air Gunner)Brian Joseph Mordecai6
Robert Henry Cole6
(Flight Engineer)R Page1
Roydon Rees5

It is known that some (or all) of these airmen continued to fly operationally with the squadron during the post war clean up, which included repatriation of POW and service personnel, Cooks Tours, testing of German radar and disposal of surplus incendiaries. However, the squadron’s record book only provides a summary of these activities and does not list the individual captains and crews that took part in these sorties.

Posting Dates

WalkerJohn SutherlandIn From:466 Squadron10/02/1945
Out to:RAF Graveley24/05/1945

Turner (LG)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that LG Turner was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties, prior to the cessation of hostilities in Europe:

  1. 03/03/1945 Kamen
  2. 05/03/1945 Chemnitz
  3. 08/03/1945 Hamburg
  4. 11/03/1945 Essen (Daylight)
  5. 13/03/1945 Gelsenkirchen
  6. 18/03/1945 Witten
  7. 21/03/1945 Bruchstrasse
  8. 24/03/1945 Gladbeck
  9. 04/04/1945 Leuna
  10. 08/04/1945 Hamburg
  11. 09/04/1945 Kiel
  12. 30/04/1945 Valkenburg (Operation Manna)
  13. 01/05/1945 Ypenburg (Operation Manna)
  14. 08/05/1945 Brussels (Repatriation of POW)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot) Leslie George Turner14
(Navigator)Patrick Seumas McGowran14
(Air Bomber)JL Lewis12
John Edward Hamblett1
Victor Hugh Horner1
(Set Operator)Albert Roche2
James Bartholomew Edwards11
(Wireless Operator)Dennis Ernest Renvoize14
(Air Gunner)Eric Arthur Jones14
Ronald Peters14
(Flight Engineer)R Hartley14

It is known that some (or all) of these airmen continued to fly operationally with the squadron during the post war clean up, which included repatriation of POW and service personnel, Cooks Tours, testing of German radar and disposal of surplus incendiaries. However, the squadron’s record book only provides a summary of these activities and does not list the individual captains and crews that took part in these sorties.

Posting Dates

Turner Leslie GeorgeIn From:74 Base15/02/1945
Out to:77 Squadron, TC11/05/1945

Trethewy (JH)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that JH Trethewy was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 07/11/1941 Essen
  2. 09/11/1941 Hamburg
  3. 25/11/1941 Brest
  4. 30/11/1941 Hamburg
  5. 06/01/1942 Brest
  6. 08/01/1942 Brest
  7. 10/01/1942 Wilhelmshaven
  8. 12/02/1942 English Channel / North Sea
  9. 08/03/1942 Essen

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)John Hugh Trethewy9
(2nd Pilot)Clifford Grove Lythgoe1
Ronald Walter Valters6
(Possibly) Henry Rupert Astbury2
(Observer)– Armstrong7
– Barker1
Jeffrey Arnold Longford1
(WOP / AG)– Elliott2
– Viner3
George Daft7
James Patrick Henderson1
John Stewart Morrison2
Richard Yates1
(Air Gunner)AM Hampton1
Donald George Southwell2
Gordon Kennedy5
H Olsen1
John Allen Wood2
(Flight Engineer)H Hunt9

Posting Dates

TrethewyJohn HughIn From:51 Squadron13/10/1941
Out to:1652 C.U.10/03/1942

Taylor (FJ)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that FJ Taylor was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 22/05/1942 St Nazaire
  2. 01/06/1942 Essen
  3. 02/06/1942 Essen
  4. 03/06/1942 Bremen
  5. 06/06/1942 Emden
  6. 08/06/1942 Essen
  7. 25/06/1942 Bremen
  8. 27/06/1942 Bremen
  9. 29/06/1942 Bremen
  10. 02/07/1942 Bremen
  11. 13/07/1942 Duisburg
  12. 19/07/1942 Vegesack
  13. 21/07/1942 Duisburg
  14. 23/07/1942 Duisburg
  15. 26/07/1942 Hamburg
  16. 29/07/1942 Saarbrucken
  17. 31/07/1942 Dusseldorf
  18. 03/08/1942 Hamburg
  19. 09/08/1942 Osnabruck
  20. 11/08/1942 Mainz
  21. 18/08/1942 Flensburg
  22. 24/08/1942 Frankfurt
  23. 28/08/1942 Nuremberg (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Frederick John Taylor23
(2nd Pilot)Kenneth Frederick Saunders2
(Observer)Albert Cook22
Walter Sharp1
(WOP / AG)Adam Linton19
Charles Burdon1
Ellis Albert Holland3
Garfield James Phillips3
Max Feindel Robbins22
William Alexander Gordon1
(Air Gunner)– Bond3
– Shaw2
Herbert Sidney McCartney14
Patrick William Tucker-Feltham22
Peter Edgar Davis1
(Flight Engineer)Graham Francis Bush21
Ronald Charles Vosper Prout1

Posting Dates

TaylorFrederick JohnIn From:__
Out to:War Casualty28/08/1942

Tait (JB)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that JB Tait was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 11/06/1941 Duisburg (Aborted)
  2. 15/06/1941 Hanover
  3. 30/06/1941 Kiel

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)James Brian Tait3
(2nd Pilot)Archibald Peter Anthony MacKenzie2
James Braidwood Stark1
(Observer)– White2
Gerard John Peter Henry1
(WOP / AG)– Elcoate3
James Patrick Henderson2
(Air Gunner)– Hill3
John Robert Armstrong Careless1
(Flight Engineer)John Norman Hindle2

Posting Dates

TaitJames BrianIn From:51 Squadron24/02/1941
Out to:RAF Linton (N/E)25/07/1941

Surtees W

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that W Surtees was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 13/07/1943 Aachen
  2. 15/07/1943 Montbéliard
  3. 24/07/1943 Hamburg
  4. 27/07/1943 Hamburg
  5. 09/08/1943 Mannheim
  6. 10/08/1943 Nuremberg
  7. 12/08/1943 Turin
  8. 16/08/1943 Turin
  9. 23/08/1943 Berlin
  10. 27/08/1943 Nuremberg
  11. 31/08/1943 Berlin (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Wilfred Surtees11
(2nd Dickie)Randall Vincent Jones1
(Navigator)George Newsham11
(Air Bomber)Henry George Wilfred Wooley11
(Wireless Operator) Herbert Arthur Penny11
(Air Gunner)Frederick Robert Hayward1
James Russell Griffin11
Thomas Henry Sutton10
(Flight Engineer)Edward James Brown11

Posting Dates

SurteesWilfredIn From:77 Squadron02/07/1943
Out to:POW31/08/1943

Sturmey (FW)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that FW Sturmey was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties, prior to the cessation of hostilities in Europe:

  1. 11/03/1945 Essen (Daylight)
  2. 12/03/1945 Dortmund
  3. 13/03/1945 Gelsenkirchen
  4. 18/03/1945 Witten
  5. 21/03/1945 Bruchstrasse
  6. 24/03/1945 Gladbeck
  7. 03/04/1945 Nordhausen
  8. 16/04/1945 Schwandorf
  9. 22/04/1945 Bremen
  10. 01/05/1945 Ypenburg (Operation Manna)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Frank William Sturmey10
(Navigator)Richard Langley Young10
(Air Bomber)George Binns1
John Richmond Hulley8
Peter James Leeves1
(Set Operator)Hugh Campbell Highet3
(Wireless Operator)Peter Charles Lord10
(Air Gunner)JF Buckley10
Leslie Cyril Gilman10
(Flight Engineer)H Walsh10

It is known that some (or all) of these airmen continued to fly operationally with the squadron during the post war clean up, which included repatriation of POW and service personnel, Cooks Tours, testing of German radar and disposal of surplus incendiaries. However, the squadron’s record book only provides a summary of these activities and does not list the individual captains and crews that took part in these sorties.

Posting Dates

SturmeyFrank WilliamIn From:51 Squadron20/02/1945
Out to:582 Squadron17/07/1945

Stringer (CS)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that CS Stringer was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 19/05/1942 St Nazaire

Prior to this, he had been 2nd Pilot (SD Jones Crew) on six sorties

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)CS Stringer1
(Observer)Alan James Child1
(Air Bomber)Jonathan Raymond Field1
(WOP / AG)Edward Whitter1
(Air Gunner)– Smith1
Leslie Ledger1
(Flight Engineer)John Griffin Davis1

Posting Dates

StringerCSIn From:10 O.T.U.26/10/1941
Out to:

Strange (KM)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that KM Strange was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties, prior to the cessation of hostilities in Europe:

  1. 22/04/1945 Bremen
  2. 25/04/1945 Wangerooge Island
  3. 07/05/1945 Ypenburg (Operation Manna)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Kenneth Macdona Strange5
(Navigator)Alfred Thomas Stoney5
(Air Bomber)Kenneth Augarde Swanton5
(Wireless Operator)John William Firth5
(Air Gunner)John Francis McPherson5
Francis Leslie Fullerton5
(Flight Engineer)C Willey5

It is known that some (or all) of these airmen continued to fly operationally with the squadron during the post war clean up, which included repatriation of POW and service personnel, Cooks Tours, testing of German radar and disposal of surplus incendiaries. However, the squadron’s record book only provides a summary of these activities and does not list the individual captains and crews that took part in these sorties.

Posting Dates

StrangeKenneth MacdonaIn From:466 Squadron20/03/1945
Out to:RAF Graveley24/05/1945

Still W

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that W Still was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 22/09/1943 Hanover
  2. 23/09/1943 Mannheim
  3. 27/09/1943 Hanover
  4. 29/09/1943 Bochum
  5. 03/10/1943 Kassel
  6. 08/10/1943 Bremen
  7. 22/10/1943 Kassel
  8. 17/11/1943 Mannheim
  9. 18/11/1943 Mannheim
  10. 25/11/1943 Frankfurt
  11. 20/12/1943 Frankfurt
  12. 29/12/1943 Berlin
  13. 14/01/1944 Special target
  14. 20/01/1944 Berlin
  15. 27/01/1944 Heligoland
  16. 28/01/1944 Berlin
  17. 25/02/1944 Augsburg

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Wilfred Still17
(Navigator)Charles Ernest Davies1
Herbert Alan Millar2
Joseph William Samuel Burden3
Lumley Charles Lawless-Pyne1
Malcolm George Harris1
Robert Charles Clark7
Victor Maurice Hanks2
(Air Bomber)Alec Arthur Stanbridge17
(Wireless Operator)William James Sander17
(Air Gunner)Douglas Edward John Stevens1
Edward Oliver Deveson15
Jack Norman Holmwood17
Winston Barrington1
(Flight Engineer)Cyril Talby17

Posting Dates

StillWilfredIn From:
Out to:635 Squadron19/03/1944

Stephenson (BN)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that BN Stephenson was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties, prior to the cessation of hostilities in Europe:

  1. 01/03/1945 Mannheim
  2. 03/03/1945 Kamen
  3. 07/03/1945 Dessau
  4. 08/03/1945 Hamburg
  5. 11/03/1945 Essen (Daylight)
  6. 13/03/1945 Gelsenkirchen
  7. 18/03/1945 Witten
  8. 24/03/1945 Gladbeck
  9. 25/03/1945 Osnabruck
  10. 27/03/1945 Paderborn
  11. 03/04/1945 Nordhausen
  12. 08/04/1945 Hamburg
  13. 09/04/1945 Kiel
  14. 10/04/1945 Plauen
  15. 22/04/1945 Bremen
  16. 07/05/1945 Ypenburg (Operation Manna)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Basil Noel Stephenson16
(Navigator)John Edmond Woods16
(Air Bomber)Denis Camber John15
(Set Operator)Basil John Studd16
(Wireless Operator)Paul Herbert Lambert16
(Air Gunner)Eric Arthur George Simpson16
Frank Peter Chiltern Saunders16
(Flight Engineer)Robert Duncan Sampson16

It is known that some (or all) of these airmen continued to fly operationally with the squadron during the post war clean up, which included repatriation of POW and service personnel, Cooks Tours, testing of German radar and disposal of surplus incendiaries. However, the squadron’s record book only provides a summary of these activities and does not list the individual captains and crews that took part in these sorties.

Posting Dates

StephensonBasil NoelIn From:640 Squadron27/01/1945
Out to:RAF Graveley24/05/1945

Steinhauer (GH)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that GH Steinhauer was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 06/01/1942 Brest
  2. 08/01/1942 Brest
  3. 10/01/1942 Wilhelmshaven (Incident)
  4. 15/01/1942 Hamburg
  5. 12/02/1942 English Channel / North Sea
  6. 08/03/1942 Essen
  7. 13/03/1942 Cologne
  8. 30/03/1942 Battleship (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew:

(Pilot)George Henry Steinhauer 8
(2nd Pilot)Joseph Thomas Pack5
Peter Gregory Brown3
(Observer)HA Hawkin1
Lewis Edward Goodrum7
(WOP / AG)David Lionel Perry1
Douglas Granville Joseph Campbell8
Eric Talbot Meade7
(Air Gunner)– Russell1
Maurice Cohen [aka Cowan]7
(Flight Engineer)– Mitchell3
James Black Dunlop5

STEINHAUER CREW
Back Row: Unknown, Steinhauer, Goodrum / Front Row: Unknown, Dunlop, Brown, Unknown
[Courtesy of Geoff Coates via Linzee Duncan]

Posting Dates

Steinhauer George HenryIn From:RAF Leeming26/10/1941
Out to:War Casualty30/03/1942

Spooner (R)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that R Spooner was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 13/07/1943 Aachen
  2. 15/07/1943 Montbéliard
  3. 24/07/1943 Hamburg
  4. 25/07/1943 Essen
  5. 27/07/1943 Hamburg
  6. 29/07/1943 Hamburg (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Robert Spooner6
(Navigator)William Lacey Breckell6
(Air Bomber)David James Anderson5
P Smith1
(Wireless Operator)William John Spence6
(Air Gunner)Rex Gordon Perrett6
Roy Webb6
(Flight Engineer)Eric Charles Fox6

Posting Dates

SpoonerRobertIn From:__
Out to:War Casualty29/07/1943

Spencer (CC)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that CC Spencer was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 10/04/1942 Essen
  2. 12/04/1942 Essen
  3. 16/04/1942 L’Orient
  4. 04/05/1942 Stuttgart
  5. 06/05/1942 Stuttgart
  6. 08/05/1942 Warnemunde
  7. 19/05/1942 Mannheim
  8. 30/05/1942 Cologne
  9. 01/06/1942 Essen
  10. 03/06/1942 Bremen
  11. 06/06/1942 Emden
  12. 08/06/1942 Essen
  13. 16/06/1942 Essen
  14. 19/06/1942 Emden
  15. 20/06/1942 Emden
  16. 22/06/1942 Emden
  17. 25/06/1942 Bremen
  18. 27/06/1942 Bremen
  19. 29/06/1942 Bremen
  20. 02/07/1942 Bremen
  21. 08/07/1942 Wilhelmshaven
  22. 21/07/1942 Duisburg
  23. 25/07/1942 Duisburg
  24. 26/07/1942 Hamburg
  25. 29/07/1942 Saarbrucken
  26. 31/07/1942 Dusseldorf (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Cyril Charles Spencer26
(2nd Pilot)– Bird1
James Keatley Watson1
Sidney Richard Stickney1
Thomas Henry Lane1
(Observer)Ronald Casey26
(Air Bomber)Ronald William Dean19
Walter Alfred Elliot1
(WOP / AG)– Munday5
– Watts1
Charles Burdon1
Harold Clarke26
Norman Moffatt5
William Gorman4
William Alexander Gordon1
(Air Gunner)– Gingell1
– Stevens5
Bertram Stanley Braybrook4
G Lowe7
Haakon Rivedal2
Robert Thomas Morris16
(Flight Engineer)Caudray Albert Charles Pithers26

Posting Dates

SpencerCyril CharlesIn From:10 O.T.U.13/09/1941
Out to:POW31/07/1942

Solomon (E)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that E Solomon was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 03/07/1943 Cologne
  2. 09/07/1943 Gelsenkirchen (Incident)
  3. 24/07/1943 Hamburg
  4. 25/07/1943 Essen
  5. 27/07/1943 Hamburg
  6. 29/07/1943 Hamburg
  7. 30/07/1943 Remscheid
  8. 02/08/1943 Hamburg (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Edmund Solomon8
(Navigator)Alfred Arthur Charles Bedward6
Horatius Douglas Stewart White2
(Air Bomber)Donald William McGlashan Archer8
(Wireless Operator)Stanislaus Cyril  McKiernan8
(Air Gunner)Alexander Stephen8
Ronald Cecil Davies8
(Flight Engineer)Alfred Norman Leslie Moss1
Herbert Pickup6
John Armstrong1

Posting Dates

SolomonEdmundIn From:__
Out to:War Casualty02/08/1943

Smith (PH)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that PH Smith was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 21/07/1942 Paris
  2. 25/07/1942 Paris
  3. 26/07/1942 Hamburg (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Peter Horace Smith3
(Observer)Derrick Arnold Holliger3
(Air Bomber)Norman McInnes Rattray3
(WOP / AG)Ellis Albert Holland3
(Air Gunner)Henry Goodrich Le Barr Pakenham-Walsh3
John Luke Graham3
(Flight Engineer)Frank William Huntley3

Posting Dates

SmithPeter HoraceIn From:102 Squadron02/07/1942
Out to:War Casualty26/07/1942

Smith (JW)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that JW Smith was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 25/07/1942 Paris
  2. 26/07/1942 Hamburg
  3. 29/07/1942 Saarbrucken
  4. 31/07/1942 Dusseldorf
  5. 05/08/1942 Paris
  6. 06/08/1942 Duisburg
  7. 09/08/1942 Osnabruck
  8. 11/08/1942 Mainz
  9. 18/08/1942 Flensburg (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)JW Smith9
(Observer)Cyril Samuel Crutchley9
(Air Bomber)Ralph Graham Humphreys9
(WOP / AG)George Arthur Brassey9
(Air Gunner)Arthur John Owen Leo9
Ronald Francis Wall9
(Flight Engineer)William Basil Cooper9

Posting Dates

SmithJWIn From:__
Out to:POW18/08/1942

Smith (JA)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that JA Smith was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties, prior to the cessation of hostilities in Europe:

  1. 08/05/1945 Brussels (Repatriation of POW)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)James Arthur Smith1
(Navigator)Richard Harold Howell1
(Air Bomber)Kenneth Allerston1
(Wireless Operator)Thomas Henry Matthews1
(Air Gunner)Robert White1
Squire Nuttall1
(Flight Engineer) Andrew Jenkinson Dick1

It is known that some (or all) of these airmen continued to fly operationally with the squadron during the post war clean up, which included repatriation of POW and service personnel, Cooks Tours, testing of German radar and disposal of surplus incendiaries. However, the squadron’s record book only provides a summary of these activities and does not list the individual captains and crews that took part in these sorties.

Posting Dates

SmithJames ArthurIn From:RAF Station Warboys23/04/1945
Out to:RAF Graveley24/05/1945

Skerrett (CR)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that CR Skerrett was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 24/07/1943 Hamburg
  2. 25/07/1943 Essen
  3. 27/07/1943 Hamburg
  4. 29/07/1943 Hamburg
  5. 02/08/1943 Hamburg
  6. 16/08/1943 Turin
  7. 17/08/1943 Peenemunde
  8. 23/08/1943 Berlin
  9. 27/08/1943 Nuremberg (Incident)
  10. 31/08/1943 Berlin
  11. 05/09/1943 Mannheim

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Charles Raymond Skerrett11
(Navigator)Ronald William Dando11
(Air Bomber)John Philip Strachan11
(Wireless Operator)Francis Gerald Murphy2
Ronald Hill9
(Air Gunner)Norman Edwin Weighell11
Robert Martin Telfer11
(Flight Engineer)Philip Robert Fox11

Posting Dates

SkerrettCharles RaymondIn From:
Out to:78 Squadron06/09/1943

Sinclair (ET)

ET Sinclair

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that ET Sinclair was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties, prior to the cessation of hostilities in Europe:

  1. 21/02/1945 Duisburg
  2. 23/02/1945 Essen
  3. 24/02/1945 Kamen
  4. 05/03/1945 Chemnitz
  5. 07/03/1945 Dessau
  6. 08/03/1945 Hamburg
  7. 11/03/1945 Essen (Daylight)
  8. 12/03/1945 Dortmund
  9. 15/03/1945 Misburg
  10. 18/03/1945 Witten
  11. 27/03/1945 Paderborn
  12. 03/04/1945 Nordhausen
  13. 04/04/1945 Leuna
  14. 08/04/1945 Hamburg
  15. 09/04/1945 Kiel
  16. 14/04/1945 Potsdam
  17. 16/04/1945 Schwandorf
  18. 18/04/1945 Heligoland
  19. 02/05/1945 Ypenburg (Operation Manna)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Eric Thomson Sinclair19
(Navigator)Stanley Ralph Gillmar18
William John Bentley1
(Air Bomber)George Edward Furnell19
(Wireless Operator)Peter Norman Duncan Skingley19
(Air Gunner)Peter Noel Howdle19
Raymond Beech19
(Flight Engineer)John Kenneth Kershaw19

It is known that some (or all) of these airmen continued to fly operationally with the squadron during the post war clean up, which included repatriation of POW and service personnel, Cooks Tours, testing of German radar and disposal of surplus incendiaries. However, the squadron’s record book only provides a summary of these activities and does not list the individual captains and crews that took part in these sorties.


Posting Dates

SinclairEric ThomsonIn From:PFF NTU24/01/1945
Out to:41 Group Pool29/10/1945

Shippam (H)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that H Shippam was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 29/12/1943 Berlin
  2. 28/01/1944 Berlin

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Frederick Shippam2
(Navigator)Leslie Roberts2
(Air Bomber)Albert Clement Michael Taylor2
(Wireless Operator)Wilfred Roland Horner2
(Air Gunner)Alfred Harold Wood1
George William Buttrick1
JF Storms1
Robert Pickles1
(Flight Engineer)Walter Stanley Mountford2

Extract from WR Horner’s Flying Log Book (January 1944) [ Courtesy of Roger Ward]

Posting Dates

ShippamFrederickIn From:78 Squadron03/11/1943
Out to:N/E Sick22/02/1944

Sherk (WS)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that WS Sherk was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 08/03/1943 Nuremberg
  2. 09/03/1943 Munich
  3. 11/03/1943 Stuttgart
  4. 10/04/1943 Frankfurt
  5. 13/04/1943 Spezia
  6. 16/04/1943 Mannheim
  7. 18/04/1943 Spezia
  8. 20/04/1943 Stettin (Incident)
  9. 26/04/1943 Duisburg

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Walter Scott Sherk9
(Navigator)Alfred Arthur Charles Bedward1
Roy Gordon Morrison8
(Observer)Elmer Harold Anthony1
(Air Bomber)Mathias Stanley Keon8
(Wireless Operator)George Glover McGladrey9
(Air Gunner)George Francis Denis Murray9
Henry Thomas Woonton8
John Meredith Fryer1
(Flight Engineer)Douglas Glenn Bebensee9

Posting Dates

SherkWalter ScottIn From:419 Squadron05/03/1943
Out to:N/E Sick06/05/1943

Scott (IJ)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that IJ Scott was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 05/09/1943 Mannheim
  2. 15/09/1943 Montlucon
  3. 16/09/1943 Modane
  4. 22/09/1943 Hanover
  5. 23/09/1943 Mannheim
  6. 29/09/1943 Bochum
  7. 03/10/1943 Kassel
  8. 04/10/1943 Frankfurt

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Ivan James Scott8
(Navigator)Jack Baldwin7
(Air Bomber)Bernard Chapman Brooker1
Michael Raymond  Dourley8
(Wireless Operator)Ivan Arnold Aram8
(Air Gunner)Derek Robinson Tulloch1
Ronald Edward Gill8
Ronald Stanley Child7
(Flight Engineer)Henry Heppenstall1
Sydney James Butler7

Posting Dates

ScottIvan JamesIn From:1663 Conversion Unit10/08/1943
Out to:10 Squadron08/10/1943

Saywell (EW)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that EW Saywell was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 13/07/1943 Aachen (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Edward Wright Saywell1
(Navigator)Ernest Raymond Moore1
(Air Bomber)Frank William Whittaker1
(Wireless Operator)Ronald William Wisson1
(Air Gunner)Frank Frederick Ward1
Stuart Fred Hughes1
(Flight Engineer)Joseph Marsh1

Ward, Hughes, Marsh, Whittaker, Saywell, Moore, Wisson [Source: 102ceylonsquadron]

Posting Dates

SaywellEdward WrightIn From:102 Squadron?_
Out to:War Casualty13/07/1943

Saunders (KF)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that KF Saunders was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 11/08/1942 Le Havre (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Kenneth Frederick Saunders1
(Observer)Lionel Parsell1
(Air Bomber)Eric Charles Herwin1
(WOP / AG)Wilfred James Reynolds1
(Air Gunner)HT Smith1
Jack Truesdell Arnold1
(Flight Engineer)Michael Goff1

Posting Dates

SaundersKenneth FrederickIn From:10 O.T.U.09/07/1942
Out to:POW11/08/1942

Sarjent (AR)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that AR Sarjent was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 12/05/1943 Duisburg
  2. 13/05/1943 Bochum
  3. 23/05/1943 Dortmund
  4. 25/05/1943 Dusseldorf
  5. 27/05/1943 Essen
  6. 29/05/1943 Wuppertal (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Allen Rex Sarjent6
(Navigator)Leonard Sidney Webb5
Ronald George Hands1
(Air Bomber)William Dixon Gray6
(Wireless Operator)Jack Benjamin James Knowles6
(Air Gunner)Colin Henry Garner6
Geoffrey Harvey Gardner6
(Flight Engineer)Daniel Robert Bown6

Posting Dates

SarjentARIn From:158 Squadron?
Out to:POW29/05/1943

Sale (DJ)

DJ Sale

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that DJ Sale was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 03/02/1943 Hamburg
  2. 04/02/1943 Turin
  3. 07/02/1943 Lorient
  4. 13/02/1943 Lorient
  5. 16/02/1943 Lorient
  6. 18/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  7. 28/02/1943 St.Nazaire
  8. 03/03/1943 Hamburg
  9. 05/03/1943 Essen
  10. 09/03/1943 Munich
  11. 11/03/1943 Stuttgart
  12. 12/03/1943 Essen
  13. 22/03/1943 St.Nazaire
  14. 27/03/1943 Berlin
  15. 28/03/1943 St.Nazaire
  16. 29/03/1943 Berlin
  17. 08/04/1943 Duisburg
  18. 16/04/1943 Pilsen
  19. 20/04/1943 Stettin
  20. 12/05/1943 Duisburg (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Douglas Julian Sale20
(Navigator)Geoffrey Edward  Heard20
(Air Bomber)Rupert Claude Sawyer20
(Wireless Operator)H Spence1
Samuel Angus Moores18
(Air Gunner) William James Simpson1
Albert Ephraim Bird1
David John Richards17
Ross Oliver Elford20
(Flight Engineer)Clarence Washington Rowley9
George Henry Cross11

Having survived the crash on 12th May 1943, he evaded capture and returned to the UK, rejoining the squadron in September 1943.

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that he was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 15/09/1943 Montlucon
  2. 16/09/1943 Modane
  3. 22/09/1943 Hanover
  4. 23/09/1943 Mannheim
  5. 27/09/1943 Hanover
  6. 03/10/1943 Kassel
  7. 04/10/1943 Frankfurt
  8. 22/10/1943 Kassel
  9. 11/11/1943 Cannes
  10. 17/11/1943 Mannheim
  11. 18/11/1943 Mannheim
  12. 22/11/1943 Berlin
  13. 25/11/1943 Frankfurt
  14. 26/11/1943 Stuttgart
  15. 20/12/1943 Frankfurt (Crash Landed)
  16. 29/12/1943 Berlin
  17. 05/01/1944 Stettin
  18. 14/01/1944 Brunswick
  19. 15/02/1944 Berlin
  20. 19/02/1944 Leipzig (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Douglas Julian Sale20
(2nd Dickie) Leonard Mountstephen Whetham3
William Cooke Dallin2
(Navigator)Alan James Dowling15
Gordon Henry Francis Carter5
(Air Bomber)Boris Oleh Bodnar12
Eric Harold Bagnald1
Geoffrey Rhodes Whitten1
Gordon Henry Francis Carter7
(Wireless Operator) Harold John Rogers4
Marcus Rees16
(Air Gunner)Derek Robinson Tulloch1
George Waller Dickenson12
John Dixon Atkinson1
Kenneth Knight2
Norman Francis Williams2
Robert Lionel Lamb18
William Hugo McCormick2
George Carpenter2
(Flight Engineer)George Henry Cross20

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Posting Dates

SaleDouglas JulianIn From:10 Squadron28/01/1943
Out to: Evader 12/05/1943
In From:RCAF Warrington02/09/1943
Out to:POW19/02/1944
Out to:War Casualty20/02/1944

Rowe (T)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that T Rowe was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 18/11/1943 Mannheim
  2. 19/11/1943 Leverkusen
  3. 22/11/1943 Berlin
  4. 25/11/1943 Frankfurt
  5. 03/12/1943 Leipzig
  6. 23/12/1943 Berlin
  7. 29/12/1943 Berlin
  8. 02/01/1944 Berlin
  9. 05/01/1944 Stettin
  10. 21/01/1944 Magdeburg
  11. 27/01/1944 Heligoland
  12. 28/01/1944 Berlin
  13. 30/01/1944 Berlin
  14. 15/02/1944 Berlin
  15. 20/02/1944 Stuttgart
  16. 24/02/1944 Schweinfurt
  17. 25/02/1944 Augsburg
  18. 22/03/1944 Frankfurt (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Thomas Rowe18
(Navigator)Edmund Howard Williams16
Gerald Walter Traylor1
Harold Leslie Hulme1
(Air Bomber)Alexander Grant15
Thomas Mercer Telford3
(Wireless Operator)Fred Haigh18
(Air Gunner)Arthur Henry Weller1
Harry Gray17
Jeffrey Eugene Pogonowski1
Malcolm Ross Hunter17
(Flight Engineer) Douglas James Park4
Abel Simpson11
Jack Weaver1
Joseph Rayton2

Posting Dates

RoweThomasIn From:77 Squadron27/10/1943
Out to:POW22/03/1944

Roux (TC)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that TC Roux was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 06/11/1942 Gardening
  2. 08/11/1942 Gardening
  3. 28/11/1942 Turin

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Theunis Christoffel Roux3
(Navigator)Peter Geoffrey Powell3
(Air Bomber)Roy Wood3
(Wireless Operator)Benjamin Thomas Royall3
(WOP / AG) Harold John Rogers2
(Air Gunner)Andrew Walt Cowan3
Michael Albert Edward Bradford1
(Flight Engineer)Frederick James Jarvis3

Posting Dates

RouxTheunis ChristoffelIn From:408 Squadron30/10/1942
Out to:1658 C.U.08/12/1942

Ross (A)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that A Ross was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 14/01/1944 Special target
  2. 27/01/1944 Heligoland
  3. 15/02/1944 Gardening
  4. 24/02/1944 Schweinfurt
  5. 25/02/1944 Augsburg
  6. 01/03/1944 Stuttgart
  7. 15/03/1944 Stuttgart
  8. 18/03/1944 Frankfurt

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Alan Michil Ross8
(Navigator)John Lane Tillam8
(Air Bomber)John Edwin Bloomer8
(Wireless Operator)John William Hoyle8
(Air Gunner)Douglas Tomlin8
Roy Douglas Hewlett8
(Flight Engineer)Peter Collinson Wilson8

Posting Dates

RossAlan MichilIn From:1652 C.U.08/12/1943
Out to:

Roe (JR)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that JR Roe was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 07/01/1942 St Nazaire
  2. 08/01/1942 Brest
  3. 10/01/1942 Wilhelmshaven
  4. 03/03/1942 Billancourt
  5. 13/03/1942 Cologne
  6. 30/03/1942 Battleship
  7. 08/04/1942 Hamburg
  8. 27/04/1942 Battleship
  9. 28/04/1942 Battleship (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)John Raemonde Roe9
(2nd Pilot)RM Newitt3
Stanley Linwood Pettingale3
(Observer)David Reginald Powell Williams9
(WOP / AG)– Elliott4
Cyril Frederick Russell2
Harold Clarke3
John Stewart Morrison9
(Air Gunner)H Olsen3
John Allen Wood2
William Russell Parr4
(Flight Engineer)Dennis Clancy Gardner Butchart9

Posting Dates

Roe John RaemondeIn From:102 Squadron26/10/1941
Out to:POW28/04/1942

Robison (TDI)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that TDI Robison was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 11/06/1941 Duisburg
  2. 12/06/1941 Huls (Incident)
  3. 15/06/1941 Hanover
  4. 26/06/1941 Kiel
  5. 30/06/1941 Kiel (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Thomas Douglas Inglis Robison5
(2nd Pilot)Laurence Hancock5
(Observer)Ernest Joseph Harding4
Robert Victor Collinge1
(WOP / AG)Albert James Heller1
Alexander James Davie2
Richard Norman Hares1
Rodney Gordon Mullally4
Ronald Leslie Somerville1
[-] Pugh1
(Air Gunner)Robert Dunn5
(Flight Engineer)James William Hays1
Percy Ingham4


Posting Dates

RobisonThomas Douglas InglisIn From:58 Squadron21/12/1940
Out to:War Casualty30/06/1941

Robinson (PB)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that PB Robinson was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 29/09/1941 Hamburg
  2. 02/10/1941 Brest
  3. 10/10/1941 Essen
  4. 12/10/1941 Nuremberg (Incident)
  5. 14/10/1941 Nuremberg
  6. 20/10/1941 Wilhelmshaven
  7. 22/10/1941 Mannheim
  8. 31/10/1941 Hamburg (Incident)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Peter Bettley Robinson8
(2nd Pilot)– Gresham5
Harry R Larson3
(Observer)Alfred Abels7
Richard Guy Baker1
(WOP / AG)Albert Edward Connor6
David John Maylott Howard1
Norman Henry Hood8
Walter Montague Gordon Wing1
(Air Gunner)Haakon Rivedal8
(Flight Engineer)John Norman Hindle8

Posting Dates

RobinsonPBIn From:10 O.T.U.01/09/1941
Out to:102 Squadron10/01/1942

Robinson (BV)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that BV Robinson (Commanding Officer, No 35 Squadron) was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 16/08/1941 Cologne
  2. 28/08/1941 Duisburg
  3. 19/09/1941 Stettin
  4. 26/10/1941 Hamburg
  5. 18/12/1941 Brest (Ditched in Sea)
  6. 30/12/1941 Brest

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Basil Vernon Robinson6
(2nd Pilot)Cecil Edgar Robertson  Parsons2
Cyril Charles Spencer1
Glenn Powell Gardiner1
Harry R Larson2
(Observer)William Abbotson Tetley1
Alfred Abels4
(Possibly) Jack Dunthorne Laurie Hall1
(WOP / AG)– Elcoate1
Albert Edward Connor1
Herbert Reginald Higgins1
JI Robinson2
Moses Lewis Usher1
Norman Henry Hood3
RW Long1
Walter Harold  Mennell2
(Air Gunner)– Hill1
Mark Anthony Sachs2
Richard Charles Rivaz2
William Russell Parr1
(Flight Engineer)– Burtonshaw1
John Norman Hindle1
(Possibly) Noel Grimoldby2
Stanley Langford Conway Watt2

BV Robinson (September 1941)

He was posted out of the squadron (to 19 OTU) in January 1942, returning as Commanding Officer in September 1942

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that he was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 24/10/1942 Milan
  2. 09/11/1942 Hamburg
  3. 18/11/1942 Turin (Incident)
  4. 02/12/1942 Frankfurt
  5. 03/02/1943 Hamburg
  6. 04/02/1943 Turin
  7. 22/03/1943 St.Nazaire
  8. 29/03/1943 Berlin
  9. 10/04/1943 Frankfurt

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Basil Vernon Robinson9
(2nd Dickie)William Henry Hickson1
(Navigator)Dudley Peter David Archer2
Elmer Harold Anthony3
Gordon Henry Francis Carter1
John Baker1
Nathaniel Halliday1
Terence Gordon O’Shaughnessy1
(Air Bomber) Kenneth Drew Rome1
Alfred Edward Ralph Bexton2
Carl Edward Sorsdahl1
Joseph Gilbert Middlemass1
Richard Martin1
Stanley Alfred Miller3
(Wireless Operator) Harry James Leonard Peto1
Allan Roland Ball2
Edward Roland Turenne1
Edward Whitter1
Francis Edward Solway1
Herbert Alfred William Jolly1
(Air Gunner)Edwin Francis Butler1
George Carpenter1
Jack Reginald Ely1
James Russell Griffin3
John Meredith Fryer1
John Napoleon Barry1
John Thomas Stanton1
Joseph Francis Dowsing1
Lloyd George Lawson3
Thomas Musselbrook Bruce1
William Joseph Freeman1
William Scott Minto Edmondston3
(Flight Engineer) Edmund Ernest Stocker2
Daniel Christie Young1
Donald Harrington Craig2
George Richard Bradley2
James Ellis Jones1
William Potter1

In May 1943, he was posted out to RAF Graveley but flew with the squadron in his capacity as Station Commander (RAF Graveley) on 15/07/1943 and on 23/08/1943, when he failed to return (*)

(*) – Loss Information –

Posting Dates

RobinsonBasil VernonIn From: 78 Squadron 03/07/1941
Out To: 19 O.T.U. 26/01/1942
In From: 19 O.T.U. 28/09/1942
Out to:RAF Graveley01/05/1943

Roache (RB)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that RB Roache was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 05/09/1943 Mannheim
  2. 08/09/1943 Special target 1st phase
  3. 15/09/1943 Montlucon
  4. 16/09/1943 Modane
  5. 22/09/1943 Hanover
  6. 23/09/1943 Mannheim
  7. 03/10/1943 Kassel
  8. 04/10/1943 Frankfurt
  9. 22/10/1943 Kassel
  10. 18/11/1943 Mannheim
  11. 19/11/1943 Leverkusen
  12. 02/12/1943 Berlin
  13. 20/12/1943 Frankfurt
  14. 21/01/1944 Magdeburg
  15. 27/01/1944 Heligoland
  16. 28/01/1944 Berlin
  17. 30/01/1944 Berlin
  18. 15/02/1944 Berlin
  19. 15/03/1944 Stuttgart
  20. 18/03/1944 Frankfurt

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Rodney Bernard Roache20
(2nd Dickie)Arthur Ganderton1
Edward John Chidgey1
(Navigator)Gordon Arthur Stocks18
Gordon Henry Francis Carter2
(Air Bomber)Charles Hogg1
Clayton Hugh Jack2
George Dennis Linacre2
Jack Clinton Wells12
Edmund Howard Williams3
(Wireless Operator)Charles Chadwick18
P Wright2
(Air Gunner)Alfred Fred Poynton3
Claude Geoffrey Whitaker3
Dennis Henry Peter Womar13
Douglas Edward John Stevens1
George Carpenter8
Jack Smith4
JT New1
Paul Berkeley White1
Thomas Nainby3
William Hugo McCormick3
(Flight Engineer)Edward Herbert Barry18
George Forman2

Posting Dates

RoacheRodney BernardIn From:78 Squadron20/08/1943
Out to:635 Squadron19/03/1944

Rigby (EJ)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that EJ Rigby was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 15/12/1944 Ludwigshafen
  2. 23/12/1944 Cologne (Incident)
  3. 27/12/1944 Rheydt
  4. 28/12/1944 Bonn
  5. 29/12/1944 Gelsenkirchen
  6. 02/01/1945 Ludwigshafen
  7. 05/01/1945 Hanover
  8. 06/01/1945 Hanau
  9. 07/01/1945 Munich
  10. 22/01/1945 Gelsenkirchen
  11. 01/02/1945 Mainz
  12. 04/02/1945 Bonn
  13. 07/02/1945 Goch
  14. 23/02/1945 Essen
  15. 27/02/1945 Mainz
  16. 01/03/1945 Mannheim
  17. 05/03/1945 Chemnitz
  18. 07/03/1945 Hemmingstedt
  19. 08/03/1945 Hamburg
  20. 20/03/1945 Heide
  21. 27/03/1945 Paderborn
  22. 04/04/1945 Leuna
  23. 09/04/1945 Kiel
  24. 10/04/1945 Plauen
  25. 14/04/1945 Potsdam
  26. 16/04/1945 Schwandorf
  27. 18/04/1945 Heligoland
  28. 25/04/1945 Wangerooge Island

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Edgell Jason Rigby28
(Navigator)Colin John Alfred Ramsey27
Richard Harold Howell1
(Air Bomber) Samuel Rene Green1
George Binns1
Harry Breeze25
John Lancaster1
(Wireless Operator)Ernest Clifford Leslie Coombs24
Thomas Henry Matthews2
William John Phillips2
(Air Gunner)Charles Wilce1
CL Carter1
F / RF Dickinson10
George L Barr1
Robert White15
Roy Frank Cooper27
Squire Nuttall1
(Flight Engineer) Andrew Jenkinson Dick1
Douglas John Varney23
George Brodie Sharpe1
George Mason Titchmarsh1
Ian Keith McGregor1
Raymond Marcel Hallett1

Extract from Harry Breezes Flying Log Book (January 1945)

It is known that some (or all) of these airmen continued to fly operationally with the squadron during the post war clean up, which included repatriation of POW and service personnel, Cooks Tours, testing of German radar and disposal of surplus incendiaries. However, the squadron’s record book only provides a summary of these activities and does not list the individual captains and crews that took part in these sorties.

Posting Dates

RigbyEdgell JasonIn From:77 Squadron17/11/1944
Out to:Air Ministry Unit20/09/1945

Richards (JRA)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that JRA Richards was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties, prior to cessation of hostilities in Europe:

  1. 22/04/1945 Bremen
  2. 25/04/1945 Wangerooge Island

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)John Robert Arthur Richards2
(Navigator)WA Gaskell2
(Air Bomber)W Davidson2
(Wireless Operator)WH Ward2
(Air Gunner)AT Riley1
CM Carter1
G Owen2
(Flight Engineer)EW Rose2

It is known that some (or all) of these airmen continued to fly operationally with the squadron during the post war clean up, which included repatriation of POW and service personnel, Cooks Tours, testing of German radar and disposal of surplus incendiaries. However, the squadron’s record book only provides a summary of these activities and does not list the individual captains and crews that took part in these sorties.

Posting Dates

RichardsJohn Robert ArthurIn From:
Out to:RAF Snaith06/10/1945

Reynolds (KH)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that KH Reynolds was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 21/07/1942 Paris
  2. 25/07/1942 Paris
  3. 26/07/1942 Hamburg
  4. 29/07/1942 Saarbrucken
  5. 31/07/1942 Dusseldorf
  6. 06/08/1942 Duisburg
  7. 09/08/1942 Osnabruck
  8. 11/08/1942 Mainz

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Kenneth Harper Reynolds8
(Navigator)Raymond William Bullen8
(2nd Navigator)Horace Johnson8
(WOP / AG)– Watts1
Albert Chadwick8
(Air Gunner)John Meredith Fryer8
Granville Harold Wheatcroft7
(Flight Engineer)James Cunningham McKnight8

Posting Dates

ReynoldsKenneth HarperIn From:__
Out to:158 Squadron14/08/1942

Reeve (GN)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that GN Reeve was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 25/06/1942 Bremen
  2. 27/06/1942 Chartres
  3. 29/06/1942 Paris
  4. 02/07/1942 Bremen
  5. 08/07/1942 Wilhelmshaven
  6. 13/07/1942 Duisburg
  7. 19/07/1942 Vegesack
  8. 21/07/1942 Duisburg
  9. 23/07/1942 Duisburg
  10. 25/07/1942 Duisburg
  11. 26/07/1942 Hamburg
  12. 29/07/1942 Saarbrucken
  13. 31/07/1942 Dusseldorf
  14. 03/08/1942 Hamburg
  15. 04/08/1942 Essen
  16. 06/08/1942 Duisburg
  17. 11/08/1942 Mainz
  18. 18/08/1942 Flensburg
  19. 24/08/1942 Frankfurt
  20. 28/08/1942 Nuremberg
  21. 13/09/1942 Bremen
  22. 14/09/1942 Wilhelmshaven
  23. 19/09/1942 Saarbrucken
  24. 05/10/1942 Aachen
  25. 13/10/1942 Kiel
  26. 15/10/1942 Cologne
  27. 24/10/1942 Milan
  28. 09/11/1942 Hamburg
  29. 18/11/1942 Turin
  30. 20/12/1942 Duisburg (Incident)
  31. 14/01/1943 Lorient
  32. 15/01/1943 Lorient
  33. 16/01/1943 Berlin
  34. 23/01/1943 Lorient
  35. 07/02/1943 Lorient
  36. 11/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  37. 13/02/1943 Lorient
  38. 18/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  39. 25/02/1943 Nuremberg
  40. 26/02/1943 Cologne
  41. 28/02/1943 St.Nazaire
  42. 01/03/1943 Berlin
  43. 05/03/1943 Essen
  44. 08/03/1943 Nuremberg

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot) Geoffrey Norman Reeve44
(2nd Pilot)Frederick Caldwell1
(Navigator)Lionel Leonard Thomas1
Reginald Gordon Houston1
F Turner19
Terence Gordon O’Shaughnessy3
Elmer Harold Anthony17
(Air Bomber)Stanley Alfred Miller44
(Wireless Operator) Harry James Leonard Peto41
– Richmond2
Garfield James Phillips1
(Air Gunner)Arthur Priestley1
(Possibly) Edward Thomas Beasley14
Gerald Frederick Freedman4
Lloyd George Lawson36
Palmer Maynard Nerland1
Roy Frederick MacDonald1
W Hiscock1
William Scott Minto Edmondston28
(Flight Engineer)George Richard Bradley43

Posting Dates

Reeve Geoffrey NormanIn From:
Out to:PDRC Bournemouth05/04/1943

Rees (OW)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that OW Rees was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 05/10/1942 Aachen
  2. 13/10/1942 Kiel (Incident)
  3. 15/10/1942 Cologne (Incident)
  4. 06/11/1942 Gardening
  5. 08/11/1942 Gardening
  6. 09/11/1942 Hamburg
  7. 20/11/1942 Turin
  8. 22/11/1942 Stuttgart
  9. 28/11/1942 Turin
  10. 02/12/1942 Frankfurt
  11. 06/12/1942 Mannheim
  12. 08/12/1942 Turin
  13. 09/12/1942 Turin
  14. 30/01/1943 Hamburg
  15. 02/02/1943 Cologne
  16. 03/02/1943 Hamburg
  17. 04/02/1943 Turin
  18. 11/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  19. 18/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  20. 19/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  21. 25/02/1943 Nuremberg
  22. 26/02/1943 Cologne
  23. 01/03/1943 Berlin
  24. 03/03/1943 Hamburg
  25. 27/03/1943 Berlin
  26. 29/03/1943 Berlin (Incident)
  27. 04/04/1943 Kiel
  28. 10/04/1943 Frankfurt
  29. 14/04/1943 Stuttgart

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Oscar William Rees29
(Navigator)Herbert Brian Felix  Lymna25
Ronald George Hands4
(Air Bomber)– Glasspool1
Edgar Leonard Killip1
Michael Charles Xavier Mack1
PA Taylor6
Ronald George Hands1
Vernon Reginald Matthews19
(Wireless Operator) Arthur Denby Barker24
Hector Alfred Jamieson1
Henry Randolph McMahon Stroud3
Marcus Rees1
(Air Gunner)Andrew Walt Cowan1
Charles Frederick Andrew2
GF Calver1
Ivor Corfield22
John Napoleon Barry1
Leonard Jesse North12
Michael Thomas Byrne3
RW Foreman3
Thomas Henry Navin Emerson6
William Austin McMullan1
William Gordon Leslie Brown3
William Joseph Freeman3
(Flight Engineer)George Henry Cross5
John Maurice Mitchell24

REES CREW
Lymna, Corfield, Barker, Rees, Mitchell, North, Matthews
[Courtesy of Andy Rees]

Extract from OW Rees’ Flying Log Book [Courtesy of Andy Rees]

Posting Dates

ReesOscar WilliamIn From:35 Conversion Flight26/09/1942
Out to:PDC Blackpool21/05/1943

Reed (DH)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that DH Reed was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 10/04/1942 Essen
  2. 12/04/1942 Essen
  3. 16/04/1942 L’Orient
  4. 08/05/1942 Warnemunde
  5. 19/05/1942 Mannheim (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Dudley Herman Reed5
(Observer)Frederick D’Orsa Hunter5
(Air Bomber)– Boyle3
Jonathan Raymond Field3
(WOP / AG)Francis Edwin Flint5
(Air Gunner)Leslie Plimmer Russell2
Luther Martin1
Richard Lionel Prosser2
William John Hopkins2
(Flight Engineer)Edward James Morris5

Posting Dates

ReedDudley HermanIn From:10 O.T.U.20/09/1941
Out to:War Casualty19/05/1942

Raggett (PR)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that PR Raggett was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 28/06/1943 Cologne
  2. 03/07/1943 Cologne
  3. 09/07/1943 Gelsenkirchen
  4. 15/07/1943 Montbéliard
  5. 24/07/1943 Hamburg
  6. 27/07/1943 Hamburg
  7. 29/07/1943 Hamburg
  8. 30/07/1943 Remscheid
  9. 02/08/1943 Hamburg
  10. 10/08/1943 Nuremberg
  11. 12/08/1943 Turin
  12. 17/08/1943 Peenemunde (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Peter Roland Raggett12
(Navigator)Albert Joseph Perkins12
(Air Bomber)Stanley Alfred Baldwin12
(Wireless Operator)Frederick Roberts12
(Air Gunner)Douglas Stewart Wood12
Peter Henry Palmer12
(Flight Engineer)Vincent Webster12

Posting Dates

RaggettPeter RolandIn From:__
Out to:War Casualty17/08/1943

Quigly (RJ)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that RGW Plutte was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 11/06/1943 Munster
  2. 12/06/1943 Bochum
  3. 19/06/1943 Le Creusot
  4. 21/06/1943 Krefeld (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Richard Joseph Quigly4
(Navigator)John Henry Roy Sarano St. John4
(Air Bomber)Francis Ronald Carpenter4
(Wireless Operator)Francis James Williams4
(Air Gunner)Jack White4
Reginald Brian Capon4
(Flight Engineer) Edmund Ernest Stocker3
John Irvine Barrie1

Posting Dates

QuiglyRichard JosephIn From:102 Squadron25/05/1943
Out to:POW21/06/1943

Price (CC)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that CC Price was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 15/09/1943 Montlucon
  2. 16/09/1943 Modane
  3. 22/09/1943 Hanover
  4. 23/09/1943 Mannheim
  5. 27/09/1943 Hanover
  6. 29/09/1943 Bochum
  7. 11/11/1943 Cannes
  8. 17/11/1943 Mannheim
  9. 18/11/1943 Mannheim
  10. 25/11/1943 Frankfurt
  11. 26/11/1943 Stuttgart
  12. 02/12/1943 Berlin
  13. 03/12/1943 Leipzig
  14. 29/12/1943 Berlin
  15. 24/03/1944 Berlin
  16. 26/03/1944 Essen
  17. 30/03/1944 Nuremberg
  18. 10/04/1944 Laon
  19. 11/04/1944 Aachen

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Charles Cleveland Price19
(Navigator)Eric Thome Heard5
Herbert Alan Millar14
(Air Bomber)Ernest Charles Nixon2
George Dennis Linacre12
James Eric Sidnell5
(Wireless Operator)LF Hughes14
W Stanne5
(Air Gunner)Albert Edward Smith2
John Carr2
JT New10
Kenneth James Rees2
Kenneth Knight14
Leonard George William Watts1
Morley Albert Arnott1
Sidney Jackson3
Horace John Walker3
(Flight Engineer) Edmund Ernest Stocker1
Bernard Oliver Baldwin5
Joseph Rayton11

Posting Dates

Price Charles ClevelandIn From:1652 C.U.04/09/1943
Out to:N/E Sick 21/01/1944
In From:N/E Sick 07/03/1944
Out to:158 Squadron16/04/1944

Pooles (MRM)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that MRM Pooles was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 07/12/1941 Aachen
  2. 11/12/1941 Cologne
  3. 18/12/1941 Brest
  4. 30/12/1941 Brest
  5. 08/03/1942 Essen
  6. 13/03/1942 Cologne
  7. 30/03/1942 Battleship
  8. 08/04/1942 Hamburg
  9. 27/04/1942 Battleship (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Michael Reginald Mark Pooles9
(2nd Pilot)– Bird5
Donald Philip MacIntyre3
(Observer)Gerard John Peter Henry9
(WOP / AG)Allan Wilstrop4
Donald Edgar Rarity9
John Ryland Jones4
Joseph Pierre Gaston Blanchet1
(Air Gunner)Frank William Gosnell Hill1
G Lowe7
Maurice Cohen [aka Cowan]1
(Flight Engineer)Dennis Sidney Hunt4
Hubert Allan Booth5

POOLES CREW
Believed to be: Henry, MacIntyre, Lowe, Pooles, Rarity, Hunt, Jones
[Courtesy of Chris Tasker]

Posting Dates

PoolesMichael Reginald MarkIn From:51 Squadron24/10/1941
Out to:War Casualty27/04/1942

Poley (RWC)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that RWC Poley was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 12/12/1944 Essen
  2. 15/12/1944 Ludwigshafen
  3. 23/12/1944 Cologne (Incident)
  4. 28/12/1944 Bonn
  5. 29/12/1944 Gelsenkirchen
  6. 06/01/1945 Hanau
  7. 22/01/1945 Gelsenkirchen

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot)Ronald William Clifford Poley7
(Navigator)(Possibly) Robert Eric Lowden Johnson7
(Air Bomber)Charles Doig1
Edward George Meredith1
Herbert William Mercy Ebdon5
(Wireless Operator)M Cohen7
(Air Gunner)D Therault5
Edward Dent1
Kenneth Frederick Judd1
R Speight6
Ronald Henry Rudyard Grayson1
(Flight Engineer)Richard Hibbert Spratt7

Posting Dates

PoleyRWCIn From:
Out to:

Plutte (RGW)

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that RGW Plutte was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 10/09/1942 Dusseldorf
  2. 14/09/1942 Wilhelmshaven
  3. 19/09/1942 Saarbrucken
  4. 05/10/1942 Aachen
  5. 13/10/1942 Kiel
  6. 15/10/1942 Cologne
  7. 24/10/1942 Milan
  8. 02/12/1942 Frankfurt
  9. 08/12/1942 Turin
  10. 14/01/1943 Lorient
  11. 15/01/1943 Lorient
  12. 16/01/1943 Berlin
  13. 23/01/1943 Lorient
  14. 26/01/1943 Lorient
  15. 03/02/1943 Hamburg
  16. 19/02/1943 Wilhelmshaven
  17. 21/02/1943 Bremen
  18. 25/02/1943 Nuremberg
  19. 26/02/1943 Cologne
  20. 28/02/1943 St.Nazaire
  21. 08/03/1943 Nuremberg
  22. 02/04/1943 St.Nazaire
  23. 04/04/1943 Kiel
  24. 08/04/1943 Duisburg

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:

(Pilot) Robert George Walker Plutte24
(2nd Dickie)James Copeland Thomas2
(Navigator)Gordon Henry Francis Carter1
Jack Kenneth Corke1
John Baker1
Elmer Harold Anthony1
Nathaniel Halliday6
William Robert Francis Grierson-Jackson14
(Air Bomber)[-] Anderson1
Donald Kenneth Allport1
Frederick Donald McColl1
Joseph Gilbert Middlemass7
Lionel Leonard Thomas6
Richard Martin1
Robert Irwin Trickett2
(Wireless Operator)Edward Roland Turenne2
Frederick Arthur Braybrook1
Glenburne George Galvin15
Francis Edward Solway7
Frederick Hay1
(Air Gunner)Charles Frederick Andrew1
Charles Fullerton Stewart15
Edwin Francis Butler3
Jack Edward Stuart Matthews12
James Bernard Anthony Scannell1
John Napoleon Barry1
John Patrick Van  Kiekebelt2
Lloyd George Lawson1
Thomas Musselbrook Bruce7
William Austin McMullan1
William Joseph Freeman1
(Flight Engineer)Albert Edward Waddicor1
Daniel Christie Young1
John Charles Goodson3
William Patrick O’Kane12
William Potter7

Posting Dates

PlutteRobert George WalkerIn From:78 Squadron07/09/1942
Out to:NTU Gransden Lodge28/04/1943

Pexton (HC)

HC Pexton

The Squadron’s Operations Record Book shows that HC Pexton was the Captain of a 35 Squadron aircraft on the following sorties:

  1. 08/04/1943 Duisburg (Incident)
  2. 14/04/1943 Stuttgart
  3. 16/04/1943 Pilsen
  4. 20/04/1943 Stettin
  5. 26/04/1943 Duisburg
  6. 30/04/1943 Essen
  7. 23/05/1943 Dortmund
  8. 25/05/1943 Dusseldorf
  9. 29/05/1943 Wuppertal
  10. 11/06/1943 Dusseldorf
  11. 12/06/1943 Bochum
  12. 16/06/1943 Cologne
  13. 19/06/1943 Le Creusot
  14. 21/06/1943 Krefeld
  15. 24/06/1943 Elberfeld
  16. 24/07/1943 Hamburg
  17. 27/07/1943 Hamburg
  18. 29/07/1943 Hamburg (Failed to Return)

The following shows the composition of his crew on these sorties, along with the number of sorties undertaken by each airman as part of his crew (as recorded in the squadron’s Operations Record Book). It should be noted that some of these sorties may have been aborted and therefore would not have counted for the purposes of their “Operational Tour”. Details of all flights (including training flights) will be recorded in their Flying Log Books:


(Pilot)Harold Cass Pexton18
(Navigator)Francis Fenton18
(Air Bomber)Cyril Duggan Hughes18
(Wireless Operator)Colin John Weldon18
(Air Gunner)Charles Frederick Andrew2
Ivor Corfield4
James Walter Warren12
William David Ronald Walters18
(Flight Engineer) Edmund Ernest Stocker2
Ernest Frederick John Willis15
Ronald McTavish Mather1

Photo Gallery (Main Crew Members)

Fenton, Weldon, Willis
[Courtesy of Colin Ainsworth and Kevin Gummer]

Posting Dates

PextonHarold CassIn From:51 Squadron26/03/1943
Out to:War Casualty29/07/1943