Lancaster PB684 (07/02/1945)

Lancaster PB684 was one of sixteen No. 35 Squadron aircraft detailed to attack Goch on the night of 7th / 8th February 1945.

Its eight-man crew comprised:

  • Daniel Bulmer Everett (Pilot)
  • John Anthony Gardner (Navigator)
  • Charles George Mitchell (2nd Navigator)
  • Clifford Owen Russell (Set Operator)
  • Leonard Stewart Thorpe (WOP / AG)
  • Cedric Alexander Fraser-Petherbridge (Air Gunner)
  • Reginald Martin Weller (Air Gunner)
  • Kelvin Gordon Munro (Flight Engineer)

There are no details in the squadron’s Operations Record Book but the AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows: No 156 Squadron aircraft (ND875) collided with friendly Lancaster (PB684) during turn off target; many aircraft over target in darkness; each aircraft shares responsibility


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

AM Form 78

The AM Form 78 shows that the aircraft was classified as FB/AC on 8th February 1945. It was repaired on site and returned to the squadron on 17th February 1945

AM Form 1180

The AM Form 1180 (Accident Card) shows: No 156 Squadron aircraft (ND875) collided with friendly Lancaster (PB684) during turn off target; many aircraft over target in darkness; each aircraft shares responsibility

Note; Whilst the card records the damage to the 156 Squadron, there are no details regarding the damage to this aircraft

AIR 14/3460

AIR 14/3460 (Summaries of aircraft damaged by enemy action at night) records the cause of damage as “Collision with No. 156 Squadron Lancaster ND875”

No. 156 Squadron ORB

No. 156 Squadron ORB shows the following for ND875: “Target Area 2214 hrs 3/4,000 ft. Orbiting to South, Port wing tip gone, due to collision”.

Citation for Second Bar to Distinguished Flying Cross (DB Everett)

One night in February 1945, Squadron Leader Everett was pilot and captain of aircraft detailed to attack Goch. Whilst making his first run over the target his aircraft was badly hit. The star-board mainplane was extensively damaged and the starboard inner engine caught fire. Momentarily the aircraft went out of control. Squadron Leader Everett quickly levelled out though and feathered the propeller of the burning engine. The flames were then extinguished. Although unable to assess the full extent of the damage sustained, Squadron Leader Everett went on to several further runs over the target, which he left only after he was satisfied as to the success of the operation. He afterwards flew the badly damaged aircraft safely to base. This officer displayed a high degree of skill, courage and resolution throughout.

The damaged engine